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by Peter Mattiessen

  • ISBN: 0517141280
  • Category: Travel
  • Author: Peter Mattiessen
  • Subcategory: Travel Writing
  • Other formats: lrf docx txt azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: E P Dutton; 1st edition (January 2000)
  • Pages: 248 pages
  • FB2 size: 1455 kb
  • EPUB size: 1884 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 202
Download Tree Where Man Was Born fb2

The Tree Where Man. Was Born.

The Tree Where Man. Introduction by. JANE GOODALL.

First published in 1972, Peter Matthiessen's "The Tree Where Man Was Born" was a National Book Award finalist in nonfiction, and predated his phenomenal half-memoir nonfiction book, "The Snow Leopard" (1978), which I read a few years ago and absolutely loved. But I did not love "The Tree Where Man Was Born. This book is a disjointed set of essays written about Matthiessen's various trips to Africa over a decade or more. There are no timelines given for any of these different trips.

A timeless and majestic portrait of Africa by renowned writer Peter Matthiessen (1927-2014), author of the National Book Award-winning The Snow Leopard and the new novel In Paradise. A finalist for the National Book Award when it was released in 1972, this vivid portrait of East Africa remains as fresh and revelatory now as on the day it was first published. From the daily lives of wild herdsmen and the drama of predator kills to the field biologists investigating wild creatures and the anthropologists seeking humanity's origins in the rift valley, The Tree Where Man Was Born is a classic of journalistic observation.

PETER MATTHIESSEN has written eight novels, a book of short stories, and, from his career as a naturalist and environmental activist . Peter Matthiessen is well known for painting glorious word pictures of all the locals he has been to.

PETER MATTHIESSEN has written eight novels, a book of short stories, and, from his career as a naturalist and environmental activist, numerous acclaimed works of nonfiction. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1974. He has won two National Book Awards, including the 2008 award for fiction for his book Shadow Country.

The Tree Where Man Was Born. Peter Matthiessen was a literary legend, the author of more than thirty acclaimed books

The Tree Where Man Was Born. In this classic volume, Matthiessen exquisitely combines both nature and travel writing to bring East Africa to vivid life. He skillfully portrays the daily lives of herdsmen and hunter-gatherers; the drama of the predator kills; the hundreds of exotic animals; the breathtaking landscapes; and the area's turbulent natural, political, and social histories. Peter Matthiessen was a literary legend, the author of more than thirty acclaimed books. In this, his final novel, he confronts the legacy of evil, and our unquenchable desire to wrest good from it. One week in late autumn of 1996, a group gathers at the site of a former death camp. Book, Online - Google Books. The tree where man was born Peter Mathiessen. The African experience Eliot Porter Dutton New York 1972. Australian/Harvard Citation. 1972, The tree where man was born Peter Mathiessen. The African experience Eliot Porter Dutton New York. Matthiessen, Peter, 1927-.

Great Matthiessen book. The pictures are great, but are too few and have nothing to do with the text. PM shifts between his experiences, the tribes and history lessons. His discussions on history and culture are fairly interesting. It gives a good look at East Africa, Maasi and the like.

Jane Goodall, Peter Matthiessen. The animals are not bad, for we and they all dwell in the forest together. The intelligence of animals is not like that of people, but it is not very different, for animals also are intelligent. animals of the forest are alike, though we eat some and not others, because we the Dorobo and they the animals all live side by side in the forest. AN ANONYMOUS DOROBO1 One winter dawn of 1961, looking westward from the Olbalbal Escarpment, I saw the first rays of morning sun fall on the Serengeti Plain, in the country that was still known then as Tanganyika.

About book: I have often heard Peter Matthiessen described as one of the all-time best nature writers, but my first experience with his work (The Cloud Forest) didn't do as much for me as I had expected it to. This one though? This one got me. While reading The Cloud Forest, I mostly had th. . While reading The Cloud Forest, I mostly had the impression that Matthiessen didn't really much enjoy his time in South America, and I felt that in many of his descriptions of the people, he seemed to be looking down on them, which, you know, made me not really like him all that much.

In this classic volume, Matthiessen exquisitely combines both nature and travel writing to bring East Africa to vivid life. He skillfully portrays the daily lives of herdsmen and hunter-gatherers; the drama of the predator kills; the hundreds of exotic animals; the breathtaking landscapes; and the area's turbulent natural, political, and social histories.
Reviews about Tree Where Man Was Born (7):
Snake Rocking
I purchased this book in anticipation of a journey to Africa. This chronicle is nonfiction, but it reads with the depth and intensity of poetry. Even though this book was written about the author's experience and impressions of Africa on a series of trips in the 1960's his insights remain timeless. The politics of Africa are convulsive and the boundaries of countries dynamic, but much of Tanzania and Kenya lands have been preserved and remain essentially the same as when Matthiessen visited 50 years ago. His descriptions of natural occurrences like the systematic attack of wild dogs on a new born zebra made me want to beg him to stop. But, he gives life to the landscape and all the animals that dwell there with same brilliant mastery of the language and pulls the reader forward. He does speak of mans beginnings as the title suggests, "Baboons in silhouette looked like early hominids hurling wild manic howling at my head." Even though the information about the descent of mankind is fascinating, for me it is Matthiessen's incredible descriptive powers that give magic to a land that is often harsh and unforgiving to man and beast. Speaking about Kilimanjaro he said, "The glacier glistens. A distant snow peak scours the mind, but a snow peak in the tropics draws the heart o a fine shimmering painful point of joy."
I will read this book again when I return from Africa to compare notes and take lessons from a truly gifted writer.
Lcena
The Tree Where Man Was Born is an interesting account of Peter Matthiessen's travels in East Africa in the 1960s. It is most interesting--and sometimes moving--when Matthiessen relates his encounters with native peoples, some of great antiquity, and describes the forces of modernity that even then were threatening their traditional ways. The only impediment to enjoyment lies in the proliferation of factual details--peoples and places--that Matthiessen presents the reader without much accommodation in the form of maps, glossaries, or an index. Some such orientation would have been helpful in the effort to keep things in geographical and anthropological perspective.
Mpapa
Matthiessen, as always, puts lyrics to the page. He writes with huge acceptance, yet shows always a moral center. That moral center sometimes informs rage at something, but that rage is eloquent, and softly expressed.

This is now a rather old book, but the pages carry the story of wild Africa right into the modern age. It's probably a past Africa, now. If so, the book and its story are a winsome lament.
Hugighma
After going on safari to Tanzania, I bought a print copy of this for my traveling companion and a kindle edition for myself. The print edition is full of amazing photographs, while the e-book has none. If I hadn’t bought the print edition, I’d never have known this. What a rip-off!
Granirad
The Tree Where Man Was Born (Classic, Nature, Penguin)The Tree Where Man Was Born

by Peter Matthiessen

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I bought this book before I knew who Peter Matthiessen was, namely, one of the greatest nature writers of all time. Because of the book's title, I thought the author would tie present day East Africa to a by-gone era when man was primitive and evolving and nature ruled. I read the first one-hundred fifty pages and put it down for five years before returning to it. At that time, I was lost in my passion for the life and times of early man and not so interested in anything that rhymed with 'present day'.

Then, after finishing that portion of my writing, I returned to what might be Matthiessen's greatest nature book (well, there is Snow Leopard and At Play in the Fields of the Lord. Hard to pick). When I picked it up the second time, I couldn't put it down. His descriptions of nature, the depth of understanding he voices for the people of the land, his vivid descriptions of what happens around him are like no one else. Here are a few of my favorites:

* Soon vegetation crowded the road, which was crossed at dusk by a band of bush-pig, neat-footed and burly, neck bristles erect, as if intent on punching holes right through the truck
* Soft hills inset with outcrops of elephant-colored boulders rose beyond a bright stretch of blue river
* Kamande Gatora is a contained person with the watchfulness of the near-blind; he had taken the Mau-Mau oath and been imprisoned, in the years after his mistress had gone home to Denmark, despite 'the kind deeds I was receiving from her untold and the old life we stayed with her
* Marsabit in June: great elephants and volcanoes, lark song and bright butterflies and far below, pale desert wastes that vanish in the sands.
* By morning the wind was blowing up in sandstorms. Flights of sand grouse, seeking water, hurtled back and forth over the cracking palms, and a train of camels etched a slow crack into the desert to the south.
* Inland, black boulders climb to far-off ridges that rise in turn to the Kulal Mountains, in Rendille Land.
* ...because the heat is dry and because the wind is never still for more than a few hours.
* Since gnu are ever willing to stampede, the crossing is a hazard for the calves, and one morning of early winter more than six hundred drowned.
* By late afternoon, when the predators become restless, raising their heads out of the grass to sniff the wind, those calves would already be running.

I'm only to pg. 127... Does it take your breath away, too?
White_Nigga
Typically beautiful description of the East African area. Would have liked more detail of the tribes living in the area. Peter Matthiessen is well known for painting glorious word pictures of all the locals he has been to. I have read most of the books he has written and am always enchanted by his love for and understanding of the lands he travel in.
Kirizius
One of the absolute best books, I have read about East Africa. So poetic that I copied down a number of quotes for future use. Matthiessen is profound but also witty and irreverent.
Very erudite description of the plight of innocent Africa and the hunters, speculators and tourists who have visited in past century.

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