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by Mark Salzman

  • ISBN: 0517193736
  • Category: Travel
  • Author: Mark Salzman
  • Subcategory: Travel Writing
  • Other formats: rtf mobi lrf lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House Value Publishing (August 19, 1997)
  • FB2 size: 1731 kb
  • EPUB size: 1709 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 851
Download Lost in Place fb2

Anyone who has enjoyed Mark Salzman's book and subsequent film "Iron and Silk" will love the glimpse at Salzman's adolescence offered in "Lost in Place. This warm and honest introspective look at the author's childhood is charming and funny.

Anyone who has enjoyed Mark Salzman's book and subsequent film "Iron and Silk" will love the glimpse at Salzman's adolescence offered in "Lost in Place. The author's love of martial arts and all things Asian manifested itself early, and Salzman's accomplishments as an adult have blossomed from his early eccentricities.

Why did the subjects have to be so boring? Did adults do this on purpose? They made the world the way it was, and then made us learn the rules so we would make sure not to change anything!

Mark Salzman to sit through a class five days a week called Plucking All of Your Hairs Out and Arranging Them in Stacks of Prime Numbers, it wouldn’t have seemed any better or worse than my actual classes. I still thought Lao-tse had the right idea when he said that if you stopped learning, your problems would be solved

BY Salzman, Mark ( Author ) { Lost in Place: Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia (Vintage) By Salzman, Mark ( Author ) May . The book was made into a 1990 film of the same title. Salzman wrote the screenplay and starred as himself in the film.

0U0DA/?tag prabook0b-20. Lost In Place: Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia. 67789/?tag prabook0b-20. 2 Titles By Mark Salzman: "Iron & Silk" & "Lying Awake. THRPO/?tag prabook0b-20.

Mark Salzman’s latest book, Lost in Place, returns to the autobiographical, and also returns to the strange brew that made Iron & Silk so appealing. The book is fascinating, especially for readers of Salzman’s previous books

Mark Salzman’s latest book, Lost in Place, returns to the autobiographical, and also returns to the strange brew that made Iron & Silk so appealing. Subtitled Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia, Lost in Place chronicles Salzman’s life before he went to teach in China. In some ways it is a fairly mundane tale of coming of age in the 1960s. The book is fascinating, especially for readers of Salzman’s previous books. We discover where his love of Chinese culture came from, and how he ended up studying classical Mandarin. We see the study of the cello in his own life, including has brief attempt at jazz cello and the interpretation of classical Indian music.

Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia. Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia.

Mark Salzman’s latest book, Lost in Place, returns to the autobiographical, and also returns to the strange brew that .

Mark Joseph Salzman (born December 3, 1959 in Greenwich, Connecticut) is an American writer. Salzman is best known for his 1986 memoir Iron & Silk, which describes his experiences living in China as an English teacher in the early 1980s. Salzman grew up in Ridgefield, Connecticut, the oldest child of a piano teacher mother and a social worker father.

Memoir of author, Mark Salzman, who tried, with often humorous results, to rise above the everyday normalcy of his childhood. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

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Reviews about Lost in Place (7):
Gavikelv
From the first page I was laughing out loud. I loved the descriptions of his early attempts at kung fu and his initial understandings of eastern philosophy. He is able to laugh at all of it, especially himself, which is all funnier knowing that he ultimately did not abandon either of them. I can remember beginning studying Zen and later yoga philosophy and being frustrated that I wasn't enlightened yet after a few years. He brought that all back in such a delightful way. His recollections of his conversations with his parents, primarily his father, were so heartwarming and filled with affection even as he was attempting to go to great extremes to not be like them. All of his experiences, including his playing the cello and spending a period of time stoned on pot, were filled with his search for the meaning of life and his unhappiness at not finding it immediately. Doesn't sound funny? Wrong! He makes it all very funny and very human. The last few pages where he sums up much of what he learned are priceless. I would say that his view of himself as mediocre was greatly mistaken. He's a gifted writer for sure and sounds like a fascinating person.
Olelifan
Although this humorous memoir should please many readers, it will especially appeal if you grew up in the 70s. Young Mark Salzman is one of those kids who, when he develops a passion, goes into it heart and soul. In this book, those passions are kung fu, the cello, and Chinese culture -- not your typical fare for an undersized, oversensitive kid from Connecticut.

Why does the book work? Contrasts. There's Mark's maniacal kung fu instructor, for instance, Sensei O'Keefe -- a ripped, hard-drinking, pot-smoking sadist who verbally and physically abuses his charges as he exhorts them to live life like the stoic Eastern masters of old (a classic, "Do as I say, not as I do" guy). Also key is the wry resignation of Mark's dad. The two are close, and Dad's pithy quips on life are dry, wise, and as funny as Bob Newhart (and if you remember Newhart, then you DID grow up in the 70s).

Toward the end, as Salzman attends Yale, the book skips about a bit and comes to a hasty conclusion, but overall it's an enjoyable voyage. In tone and style, Salzman is somewhat like Tom Perrotta, whose book of stories, BAD HAIRCUT, is similar to this. If you enjoyed that book, check this one out (and vice versa). Recommended.
Hulore
Anyone who has enjoyed Mark Salzman's book and subsequent film "Iron and Silk" will love the glimpse at Salzman's adolescence offered in "Lost in Place." This warm and honest introspective look at the author's childhood is charming and funny. The author's love of martial arts and all things Asian manifested itself early, and Salzman's accomplishments as an adult have blossomed from his early eccentricities. Salzman was a bizarre kid, and this fact makes for terrific storytelling (at one point, he attempted to become a Zen monk, living austerely in the basement of his family home). The author has a natural, easy-going writing style that is at the same time intelligent and concise. He admits to the stranger moments of his adolescence with grace and dignity, and treats his accomplishments humbly. "Growing Up Absurd" is such a terrific story - Salzman's early teen experiences make a case for the adage "from humble beginnings come great things!." With a childhood like this (weird as he was), it's easy to see how Salzman grew up to be a great writer and filmmaker.
Ndlaitha
I first found this book serendipitously in the library when I was looking for a Biography in the S section. I was not familiar with Mark Salzman or any of his books. However the back cover described a time period and young person's life that was very familiar. I was able to read it very quickly which is my first clue that this could be a 4 to 5 star book.

I loved it because it was well written and like the "Wonder Years" described a phase we all go through with comedy, sadness, and sincerity. He describes parents we wonder about during the time we live with them but find out many years later how lucky we were to have them. His search for the meaning of life passes through kung fu, a summer of pot, and Chinese Literature at Yale. He doesn't quite find it but finally learns what he needs from the most unexpected of places. I give it a five star because of my last clue of greatness - as I was getting closer to the end I would see how close I was to the last page and then get a little sad.
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
This is a wonderful book about adolescence and identity, about a family in which wonderful parents handle their children with love and patience and skill, transmitting values, and teaching the importance of discovering what you care most about. It is hilariously funny at times, deeply moving at others, and filled with wisdom and insight.
Melipra
Memoir of Mark Salzman's adolescent years in Connecticut. Outrageously funny in spots, touching in others, and interesting throughout. The author's description of Sensei O'Keefe and the stories surrounding the Kung Fu Dojo are riotous. Ed, his eternally pessimistic father, adds another element of humor to the story. The novel describes an eccentric teenager's failed attempts to "change myself into something I'm not. The story of my life." He obsessively pursues first Kung Fu to become a fearless warior, then years of cello training to achieve a dream of becoming a concert celloist, and majors in Chinese at Yale because "it was the one subject I had a head start in and could therefore look smarter than I really was." The book is a good reflection back on the eccentricities of adolescence with a profound message offered in the end.
Karon
Funny, poignant, touching and heartfelt. A joy to read and very entertaining. However, the last few pages paint an entirely bleak view of the world. Very disappointing and grim.

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