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by Bruce Roscoe

  • ISBN: 0875864929
  • Category: Travel
  • Author: Bruce Roscoe
  • Subcategory: Asia
  • Other formats: mobi lrf rtf doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Algora Publishing (July 13, 2007)
  • Pages: 308 pages
  • FB2 size: 1733 kb
  • EPUB size: 1454 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 348
Download Windows on Japan: A Walk through Place and Perception fb2

Windows on Japan book. The author walked a route that connects the ports of Niigata and Yokohama and from these windows on the world considers perceptions of people and place

Windows on Japan book. The author walked a route that connects the ports of Niigata and Yokohama and from these windows on the world considers perceptions of people and place. He also assesses the effect of Japan on writers from Jonathan Swift to Oscar Wilde, Shirley MacLaine and Paul Theroux with surprising results.

Abegglen lived permanently in Japan with his Japanese wife after 1982 and took . Abegglen authored and co-authored ten books on Japan. Roscoe, Bruce (2007). Windows on Japan: A Walk Through Place and Perception. p. 241. ISBN 9780875864938.

Abegglen lived permanently in Japan with his Japanese wife after 1982 and took Japanese nationality in 1997. Abegglen served successively as professor and director of the Graduate School of Comparative Culture at Sophia University, chairperson of Asia Advisory Service . and dean emeritus of Globis University in 2006. A selection: The Japanese Factory (1958). Big Business in America (1955). Kaisha, the Japanese Corporation (1985).

In Windows on Japan a New Zealander walks across rural Japan and ponders centuries-old perceptions about the .

In Windows on Japan a New Zealander walks across rural Japan and ponders centuries-old perceptions about the country that is still prisoner to an isolationist past.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Roscoe Riley Rules Don't Tap-Dance on Your Teacher. Windows on Japan - A Walk Through Place and Perception. Категория: Компьютеры, Операционные системы.

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In Windows on Japan, a New Zealander walks across rural Japan and ponders centuries-old perceptions about the country that is still prisoner to an isolationist past.

Select Format: Perfect Paperback. Format:Perfect Paperback. ISBN13:9780875864914.

Bruce Feiler is the author of six consecutive New York Times bestsellers . Feiler took me on a journey through the Holy Land like no other author. Feiler has a great sense of place, and his companions on the journey were colrful and informative.

Bruce Feiler is the author of six consecutive New York Times bestsellers, including Abraham, Where God Was Born, America's Prophet, The Council of Dads, and The Secrets of Happy Families. My friends who have made the trip and then read his book tell me this is the closest one can get to gaining perspective on the terrain and culture as one can get without hopping on a plane.

Published June 15, 2007 by Algora Publishing. There's no description for this book yet.

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In Windows on Japan a New Zealander walks across rural Japan and ponders centuries-old perceptions about the country that is still prisoner to an isolationist past. In a deeply insightful commentary, the author surveys cultural, social and political mores, explores the wellspring of racial perception and the problem of the memory of war. Windows on Japan alternates chapters of physical travel with travel through perception about Japan, and challenges the logic of much Western thought about the country that perplexes as much as it pleases. The author walked a route that connects the ports of Niigata and Yokohama and from these windows on the world considers perceptions of people and place. He also assesses the effect of Japan on writers from Jonathan Swift to Oscar Wilde, Shirley MacLaine and Paul Theroux with surprising results. The trading entity that wraps its tentacles around the globe, converses in most languages and understands most customs, is perceptive and urbane and none appears more capable or cosmopolitan. Yet the individuals who inhabit these islands take refuge in their language as a private habitat, resent intrusions, and are captured by a cultural particularism that distances them from others. The author discusses this paradox, as well as environmental and linguistic issues and topics of history and literature. Along the way, he lifts a veil on the life of a snow country geisha, discusses current events with a priest and a reporter, and takes advice on becoming a Japanese. Though he is understood, it is only on return visits to places he has come to love that he wins acceptance. Notes on music delightfully enrich the narrative.
Reviews about Windows on Japan: A Walk through Place and Perception (7):
NI_Rak
If you've ever finished reading the "Japan Times" newspaper in five minutes, finding it about as satisfying as an over-puffed Japanese donut; or if you've ever been driven to open Lonely Planet's "Japan" guidebook at some random page, in the faint hope of discovering some remnant of its first-edition frankness and enlightening humour; then maybe what you really need to do is read Bruce Roscoe's "Windows on Japan".

This book isn't just for inquisitive Western expats or footloose travellers who need travel insights and entertainment. It can also be quite inspirational for anyone seeking to build a bridge across the broad gulf that seems to separate Japanese and Western cultures.

Many of us have stepped onto a personal "Nihombashi" ("Japan Bridge"), be it for reasons of career, romance, or adventure. Bruce Roscoe has definitely crested the gentle red-lacquered curve of this bridge. However, he also raises the valid question as to whether learning the language; marriage to a Japanese woman; living in Japan for decades; reporting on the country for prestigious international journals; or even the birth of his children there, have entitled him to step off that bridge on the Japanese side. The answer will both surprise and intrigue the reader. It will also give each reader much to ponder about themselves.

Bruce Roscoe is a New Zealander by birth. Maybe surprisingly, a New Zealander has the right perspective to make the many keen observations which crop up on every page of this book. (In some ways, it helps not to be an American when philosophising about the relationship between Japan and the West, because so much of this relationship has been shaped by America's 150-year love/hate relationship with Japan. This book reprises the conflicting emotions of this stormy love affair - a relationship that, amongst many other things, coined that oddest of oxymorons - "Pacific War".)

Those of us who have seen both New Zealand and Japan always notice their geographical similarity. (Today, Samurai movies are filmed in New Zealand's Hokusai-like landscape.) However, one is also struck by their extreme contrast in population and industrialisation. In terms of cultural observation, the history-starved inhabitants of the "New World" can also be very adept at obtaining a panoramic view of the intricacies of an ancient culture such as that of Japan (with its long-accumulated strata of change and resistivity - folded and faulted like an alpine range...).

In writing "Windows on Japan", Bruce Roscoe actually walked through the historic passes of the breathtaking Japanese Alps, following the route of one of the five famous highways that unified the country from the time of the Shoguns 400 years ago. Ironically though, Roscoe only briefly describes the appearance of the mountains! This is really a book about people and cultural transition. The intricate drapery of personal observation hangs quite luxuriously on the framework of the travelogue.

The "walking" theme of the book mainly provides lots of time and space for the author to contemplate a beguiling swirl of issues. Discussions on such things as foreigners' depictions of Japan; language; music; and tourist tips from centuries past, are punctuated with brief reality-bites on arcane travel topics - such as how to thumb a lift through narrow trans-mountain tunnels without freaking-out the passing drivers! (Hint: use a polite sign, and remove your hat.)

This is a book about the challenges of finding acceptance in Japan, written by a man doing something that the Japanese simply don't do (at least in their own country!) - hiking along the roadside all by oneself. Very few readers will be inspired to walk Roscoe's route for themselves, but many will be attracted to his method of letting serendipity drive contemplation.

Other authors have hiked greater distances across Japanese mountains, and many Western authors have written travelogues about Japan (delightfully, Roscoe ruminates on some of the most interesting!). However, none of these other writers have demonstrated quite the same approach to discovering fascinating insights. For example, Roscoe is the type of observer who is curious enough to sit down with a major daily Japanese-language newspaper and tally up the number of English words that have been abducted into the Japanese language. Roscoe's effort - redolent of the fabled tirelessness of the Japanese "salaryman" - yields the startling statistic of 337 introduced terms in just that one newspaper. - Defining, with exquisite clarity, the ongoing flood of change into the still waters of this apparently undiluted culture...

There must be nearly a thousand other cross-cultural topics touched upon in this book. All are thought-provoking.

With its multiplicity of stimulating themes, and attractive prose describing the sometimes-unattractive follies of man, this is a book that the reader can go back to again and again. The mark of a "classic".
Inth
This book is for those of us who find traveling by foot, especially in Japan, gives us time to see and think in ways that we cannot do when rushing along by car, train, or even bicycle. A former expert on the Japanese shipping industry, Roscoe walks from the Japan Sea port of Niigata to the Pacific port of Yokohama, encountering racist noodle vendors, a tiny jazz bar visited by Jazz great Bill Evans, a zen priest who wants to make a pilgrimage to Charlotte Bronte's grave, and the neighbors of Kawabata's Snow Country geisha.
In between he ponders the way the world looks at Japan, from a nearly unknown visit by Gulliver himself, to New Zealanders affected by their own bloody encounter with Japanese POW's.
When one takes time to walk through a country, it is good to bring along a friend who is full of thoughts, facts and ideas, unburdened by central thematic ax being ground, and who will lead you to places unexpected.
Windows on Japan provides that friend and his ideas.
Uthergo
In "Windows on Japan", Bruce Roscoe takes us on a journey starting from the "rear" of Japan in Niigata, over the Japanese Alps and then through the bustle of Tokyo to the port of Yokohama. During this soujourn, he takes us not only on a mystic walk through the heart of Japan, but also on a tour of the philosophical graffiti written on the walls of his heart.

To be honest, when I began reading the book I wasn't sure if I would like the format -- one chapter typically covers his trek through a little-known area of Japan, while the next would survey his thoughts on Japanese cultural issues. Nevertheless, I soon got used to his style and found myself enjoying the book immensely. As an aside, I live in Niigata City, so I had a particular interest in his views about many of the places in where he walked.

Roscoe does not write with the whiny, judgmental tone of many Westerners living in Japan. He writes instead with respect and integrity. Where he sees corruption, discrimination or injustice, he says so, but where he finds beauty, sincerity and flashes of the transcendent, there he writes truly memorable prose.

I was filled with both respect mixed with envy for Roscoe's experiences, because he walks quietly and effortlessly into the lives of earthy barmaids, subdued jazz aficionados, stale government workers, crabby cooks and passionate Buddhist Priests. His knowledge of Japan and the Japanese language is deep as it is admirable, and this allows him to be very much something of an insider dressed foreigners' clothes. Roscoe is one who can show us that the Japanese are no more inscrutable than those from other island cultures (such as New Zealand with its own dirty laundry of war crimes against Japanese) or cultures who treat the world with an island-like mythos (such as America, who corporately is committing acts of torture in defense of an imaginary war that is disturbingly evocative of the Japanese rhetoric from the 1930s).

A couple of places in Roscoe's book have left an indelible mark on my own thinking. One was his conversation with Japanese cultural authority Donald Richie, in which he noted that "Japan upsets puritan moralists...those who believe in a wrong way and a right way" (pg. 52). How true. I have seen this in the lives of many foreigners who struggle with Japan and who have not yet made Roscoe's mental journey. I must admit that I too have had my issues with this, but Roscoe's attitude of openness throughout the book suggests a non-judgmental way out of that mental prison. In addition, when he writes of nationalism, Roscoe states, "I don't believe that anyone is a Japanese or a German or an American. We should strip these accreted coatings as we strip peeling paint from wood, leaving only the grain and texture of our native timber to show through. The coatings seem always seized upon to impress that one people are inferior or superior to another, with no good and frequent fatal result" (pg. 214). Such thoughts are certainly threatening to the elites of various countries who would want their respective tribes to toe the line uncritically. That is why I found myself liking Roscoe's book even more the longer I chose to mentally travel with him through Japan.

As with any book, there were weaknesses. I think "Windows on Japan" should have concluded with Roscoe reaching Yokohama. However, he backtracks to Niigata. To me this somehow seems to go against the flow of his journey, though his reasons for returning are understandable. There are also a number of typographical errors in the book, which were probably unavoidable, but I can't help but thinking that the proofreaders at Algora should have redoubled their efforts before publishing this excellent book.

Despite these minor shortcomings, I would highly recommend "Windows on Japan". The book is not only a peek into some of the little-known areas of Land of the Rising Sun, it also has the potential to pry open a window into one's own heart as they reflect upon the deeper implications of Roscoe's thoughts and experiences.

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