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by Wade Brackenbury

  • ISBN: 1565121481
  • Category: Travel
  • Author: Wade Brackenbury
  • Subcategory: Asia
  • Other formats: lit docx azw txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books; 1 edition (January 2, 1997)
  • Pages: 252 pages
  • FB2 size: 1194 kb
  • EPUB size: 1220 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 753
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Wade Brackenbury wanted an adventure, and he got the journey of a lifetime. Along with a charismatic photographer named Pascal has been added to your Cart.

Wade Brackenbury wanted an adventure, and he got the journey of a lifetime.

Yak Butter & Black Tea book. Yak Butter & Black Tea is a story of daring Wade Brackenbury wanted an adventure, and he got the journey of a lifetime. Along with a charismatic photographer named Pascal, Wade went seeking the Drung people, a dwindling minority in the vast empire of China, said to live in an obsure valley in Southern Tibet. No Westerner had been to the Drung valley in over a century. Yak Butter & Black Tea is a story of daring and adventure, offering a fascinating glimpse into a hidden corner of contemporary China.

Brackenbury, Wade, 1964-.

Wade Brackenbury's Yak Butter & Black Tea is a story of daring and adventure. It also offers a fascinating glimpse into a little-known corner of contemporary China

Wade Brackenbury's Yak Butter & Black Tea is a story of daring and adventure. It also offers a fascinating glimpse into a little-known corner of contemporary China.

Brackenbury finally cuts loose from his companions and treks on alone Occasionally self-indulgent and slow, Brackenbury's memoir is best read for the local color and some chilling.

Brackenbury finally cuts loose from his companions and treks on alone. His skills as a chiropractor are called on frequently as he ""adjusts"" the joints of various Tibetan pilgrims, and on the whole he gets on tolerably well with a suspicious and poorly fed people, who grudgingly offer him shelter and, less frequently, food. Finally, Brackenbury reaches his goal, but only after arduously hiking over snow-covered passes and clambering down steep cliffs, and the Drung turn out to be less isolated than the author had imagined. Occasionally self-indulgent and slow, Brackenbury's memoir is best read for the local color and some chilling, death-defying moments.

Items related to Yak Butter & Black Tea: A Journey into Tibet. Wade Brackenbury wanted an adventure, and he got the journey of a lifetime

Items related to Yak Butter & Black Tea: A Journey into Tibet. Brackenbury, Wade Yak Butter & Black Tea: A Journey into Tibet. ISBN 13: 9781565122017. Yak Butter & Black Tea: A Journey into Tibet. Wade Brackenbury wanted an adventure, and he got the journey of a lifetime.

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Yak Butter and Black Tea : A Journey into Tibet.

Wade Brackenbury wanted an adventure, and he got the journey of a lifetime. Along with a charismatic photographer named Pascal, Wade went seeking the Drung people, a dwindling minority in the vast empire of China, said to live in an obsure valley in Southern Tibet. No Westerner had been to the Drung valley in over a century. Yak Butter & Black Tea is a story of daring and adventure, offering a fascinating glimpse into a hidden corner of contemporary China. And it is the account of a young man, driven by a compulsion he doesn't understand, as he tests himself in this dangerous, exotic land. "A remarkable account of exploration and adventure in forbidden lands. Travel writing of the old school at its best."--Joe Simpson, author of Dark Shadows Falling and Touch of the Void.
Reviews about Yak Butter & Black Tea: A Journey into Forbidden China (7):
Skillet
Really loving this detailed story- author paints a perfect picture - and now, along with the back pack I bought- ( https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01G55FVC0/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 ), I am about to head out to Tibet myself, I think!
Ranenast
This was one of the most exciting books I've ever read. You expect this kind of action and suspense only in fiction, so it's all the more impressive to read of these actual events. Now I know that there is an actual Indiana Jones out there! This book is one of a kind! I love how the author writes in a way that is simple yet exciting.
Rich Vulture
Thoroughly enjoyed!
Maldarbaq
This books describes travels in southern China, near and in Tibet, especially an expedition to the valley in which the little-contacted Drung people live. The book is fast-paced and deals with a great topic -- off-the-beaten-path travels in a fascinating part of the world. However, it suffers from two big flaws. First, it is particularly well written. Dialogue, especially, is clunky, and descriptions in general of travel are workmanlike. Bizarrely, the lengths to which the author goes to preserve rolls of film are often mentioned, yet there are no photographs in the book! (I was sure, reading, that one of these stories would end with the loss of all the film, explaining the lack of photos.) Second, the author seems strikingly un-curious about the cultures, lives, and social context of the remarkable places he's traveling through. Even the Drung, ostensibly the reason for the travels, barely get a few paragraphs of description and exploration. Other reviewers have commented that the author comes across as an "ugly American." I don't think he seems arrogant or mean-spirited, in fact he seems fairly nice, but he does seem remarkably un-curious -- not a good thing for a traveler, and especially a travel writer! I'm fond of travel books, and books about the Himalayas and nearby regions (Tibet, Bhutan, etc.). These biases push my rating to 3 stars rather than 2.
Tojahn
This book was a great read, and a refreshing brake from the run of the mill books on travel. I almost couldn't put it down, finishing it up in two evenings! What makes Dr. Brackenbury so appealing is his stark honesty, along with his ability to accurately portray, to convey to the reader an understanding of what he is going through. There is a clear-cut ethical dilemma in his decision to undertake this illegal expedition into a closed part of Tibet. And yet he makes no attempt , to hide from the reader his own responsibility, short comings and mistakes. I was in particular impresses with the physical difficulties of the trip, the difficulty in obtaining food, in staying healthy, and warm. With out over doing it, the author portrayed these obstacles in such a way, as I could imagine my self there, cold and hungry and afraid. This book abounds with accounts of real encounter, real danger and actual suffering, both physical and emotional and to an extent that is necessarily missing from most travel literature. I have read virtually every account about past illegal attempts to visit Tibet, my favorite two books have been up till now 7 years in Tibet, and trespassers on the top of the world. Yak butter and black tea is the first book I have read in resent times that approaches the true live drama and adventure I enjoyed in these. Within the first few pages of the book, it becomes apparent that the author is somewhat harsh in personality, strong willed and forceful. Someone less so would not have been able to complete such a journey, There were instances where I didn't agree with his methods of obtaining help from the native Tibetans. But I was also impressed with his candid attempts to put something back. Time and again, he shares his limited medicine, and takes time out to treat the villagers with his chiropractic skills. The book builds to an exciting climax as Brackenbury finally does make it to the "forbidden valley" as he calls it. His first encounter with the People of the Drung was poignant indeed. I think what struck me most, was a passage near the end of the book where the author portrays his reluctance to leave his temporary primitive out law existence, and go back to modern life.
Anasius
This book is a VERY visceral account of a Western American's journey into his own machismo and through minority areas within the Chinese Empire. There is disappointingly little information about the Dulong/Drung people, and it is very easy to question the ethics of how two Western men bent on being the first Westerners to get into the Drung Valley treated people--especially Tibetans whose hospitality they could be viewed as exploiting, but even petty Chinese bureaucrats. Brackenbury is self-critical and seems to come to realize the indefensible aspects of his conduct. At the same time, he clearly endeavored to ease suffering through his medical and chiropractic skills and to minimize the negative impact on those he encountered. His indisputable physical courage is complemented by the courage to present material that is used by some amazon reviewers to indict him.

Although the book is mostly about him and what he put himself through on a very difficult trek, I think that it provides insight into the brittle relations between the indigenous leaders (who generally accepted, aided, and even defended him) and the colonial Chinese officials who do not learn the language and are the active agents of ethnocide. Battling provincial bureaucrats is a major part of the travel literature genre, and Brackenbury seems to me to be fair in showing some virtues as well as vices of the Chinese officials.

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