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by Susan Wolfe

  • ISBN: 0804105405
  • Category: Thriller & Mystery
  • Author: Susan Wolfe
  • Subcategory: Mystery
  • Other formats: mbr txt lit mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ivy Books (April 30, 1990)
  • FB2 size: 1198 kb
  • EPUB size: 1324 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 322
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The Last Billable Hour book.

The Last Billable Hour book. Susan Wolfe’s first book, The Last Billable Hour, was a classic in its day and remains remarkably relevant to Silicon Valley in the 21st century, taking the reader inside the big law firms that still pull plenty of strings in today’s version of High Tech. Wolfe is a deft storyteller and readers will be drawn to this compelling mystery and its colorful characters, the like of which can still be found scuttling across the green campuses of the social media giants.

Susan Wolfe is a lawyer with a . from the University of Chicago and a law degree from Stanford University. After four years of practicing law full time, she bailed out and wrote the best-selling novel, The Last Billable Hour, which won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel

Susan Wolfe is a lawyer with a . After four years of practicing law full time, she bailed out and wrote the best-selling novel, The Last Billable Hour, which won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel. She returned to law for another sixteen years, first as a criminal defense attorney and then as an in-house lawyer for Silicon Valley high-tech companies.

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The Last billable hour. The Last billable hour. by. Wolfe, Susan, 1950-. 1st Ballantine Books ed. New York : Ivy Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. External-identifier. urn:acs6:lf:pdf:44a-e2e030bb01b7 urn:acs6:lf:epub:5fb-6a4c58fb9b01 urn:oclc:record:1035893252. After four years of practicing law full time, she bailed out and wrote the best-selling novel,The Last Billable Hour, which won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel

Susan Wolfe is a lawyer with a . After four years of practicing law full time, she bailed out and wrote the best-selling novel,The Last Billable Hour, which won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel. Born and raised in San Bernardino, California, she now lives in Palo Alto, California, with her husband, Ralph DeVoe

Flawed but appealing: a mystery debut set at a Silicon Valley law firm, with amusingly precise glimpses of attorney gamesmanship and a mostly endearing (somewhat overdrawn) nebbish-hero. Howard Rickover, cultured but nerdy and disheveled, is the new.

Flawed but appealing: a mystery debut set at a Silicon Valley law firm, with amusingly precise glimpses of attorney gamesmanship and a mostly endearing (somewhat overdrawn) nebbish-hero. Howard Rickover, cultured but nerdy and disheveled, is the new associate at Tweed-more & Slyde in San Mateo, at sea in a sudden flood of depositions, wills, interrogatories, and other mystifying labors.

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Find nearly any book by Susan Wolfe. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780595000890 (978-0-595-00089-0) Softcover, iUniverse, 2000. Find signed collectible books: 'The Promised Hand'.

* Winner of the Edgar Award for Best First Mystery"Susan Wolfe is at her best depicting--and spoofing--the glitzy law firm scene. A lawyer herself, she serves her damages with skill and obvious glee."--The New York Times Book Review"A world of captivating corruption...with a delicate blend of malice, suspense and sharp psychology, Wolfe winds up her story with a scene that explodes a number of myths."--San Francisco Chronicle Welcome to the Silicon Valley law firm of Tweedmore & Slyde, where multimillion-dollar deals are the order of the day, ambition runs high, and stabbing a colleague in the back could be taken all too literally.T&S is a hot firm making a bid to be a major national player when Leo Slyde--the company's chief rainmaker, its king of the "billable hour"--is found stabbed to death in his corner office. It falls to T&S's brightest, most unjustifiably insecure young associate Howard Rickover to conduct a risky "inside job" for homicide detective Sarah Nelson. But can Howard flush out a wily murderer among lawyers who do not make it their practice to be caught unprepared--and still keep up with an associate's impossible workload?
Reviews about The Last Billable Hour (7):
Getaianne
I had great hopes for this book, as it was set in a law firm and written by someone who had worked in one. It promised an insider's view of the machinations of a law firm where all that matters are the billable hours (true to varying degrees in all law firms). Having worked in a law firm on the other side of the country myself, I was interested in reading about the goings-on in a Silicon Valley firm. However, the book was written in 1989 and so was about a nascent Silicon Valley, not the one we know today. There wasn't nearly as much about the actual functioning of the firm as I would have liked (but probably would have been boring to many). The characters and office intrigues were, in general, stereotypes. The protagonist, Howard, is meant to be an endearing bumbler, but I kept wondering why he had ever been hired by such an allegedly high-powered firm. There are some amusing moments between him and the female detective, who, naturally fall for each other. And It all ends rather too abruptly.
Zymbl
I really enjoyed this book. The main character is not good-looking or even a brain trust. He does not have a studly physique. He is believable, likeable, and makes mistakes. He struggles like we all do. He doesn't show prowess with guns or fighting. What a breath of fresh air and change from the alpha male hero!
Beanisend
I came to mysteries at the end of my extended undergrad years. As I was making the transition from a student writer of classroom papers to a citizen worker, I discovered Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler and Chester Himes and Ross MacDonald. In each book—and overall--I could escape into new worlds of meaning and decisive action—bad guys with good behavior, good guys with damaged histories and beautiful women who always seemed to be at the root of the major problems. What always struck me about this multi-strand genre was how good work was based on—and even created—a cultural context, and how the reader moved through that world by information—by learning and discovery.
Susan Wolfe sets her fine novel (The Last Billable Hour) in a high end law firm in Silicon Valley in the 1980s. She develops the context with vivid observations of the culture, the norms, styles, pervasive jokes and interpersonal maneuvering of legal professionals. Into this sharkfest, Howard Rickover, a recent law school grad, has found his way through family connections. A frumpish blend of intelligence, good intentions and fine cooking skills, he realizes that he is probably being used by the sharp, smart and cynical for short purposes and his survival is unlikely. When a senior partner is murdered, he enters into a complicated relationship with the detective in charge, an extremely able woman with a complicated past who may be using him as an inside source beyond his understanding of implied consent.
The story moves through description of situations and circumstances. It is a layered and complex tale of hopes and frustrations, and achievements, betrayals and surprising competence, but the story emerges at the edges as the scenes meet one another. The characters are extensive and unique but this is revealed as much through their behavior and their conversations as any direct unpacking by the author. Only Rickover serves as an occasional lens and unknowing bait, and also shows some promise as a developing forensic lawyer.
(One other thing to mention… The book was written in the 1980s, and reading it from the 2k-teens I was struck by its sense of privilege and lack of diversity. It seemed very much of its time and place without having any anticipation of what would be ahead (or, with one exception in the detective, any anchor in contemporary struggles). Last Billable Hour won the 1990 Edgar for Best First Novel, but in a similar period there were works that touch on the urban and international turmoil that were ahead. I am not sure what this means, except that there is a significant tradition of lighter fare in mysteries that people like me can miss in our noire origins.)
Balladolbine
I just re-read this book and it's as good as I remembered! It's several things at once: a murder mystery, a comic novel, a moral tale, and a skillfully drawn depiction of certain high-octane years in a Silicon Valley law firm. And the theme is still current: Howard’s insecurities will resonate with young lawyers struggling to develop their legal skills as they adjust to the directive of the billable hour.
The world of Tweedmore & Slyde is both glamorous and daunting to its newest associate, Howard Rickover. After Leo Slyde, the “king of the billable hour,” is found stabbed to death, the homicide detective on the case enlists Howard in investigating who might have had a motive to do away with Leo. Howard and Sarah Nelson, the investigator, become our touchstones in this world of nastiness and pretense. Readers will laugh out loud as the two rumpled investigators confront some of the hotshot lawyers and uncover a variety of unsavory facts.
watchman
I liked the book because of the strong characterizations. There were areas that jumped around, making for choppiness in the interesting tale as it was unwinding. A good summer read, especially if you have had experience discussing billable hours.
Yozshugore
This book is worth reading and re-reading. Set in a slick Silicon Valley law firm, the very likeable protagonist is a young lawyer trying to translate the theory he learned in law school to actual practice in a fast-paced law firm. He quickly realizes he is the smallest of small fish, and he is swimming among sharks. When his boss gets murdered, the plot thickens, for everyone in the firm seems to have a motive for the crime. The crime is well thought out, the language is witty and the characters are vivid. I read this book when it was first published in 1989 and gave it to all of my friends and family who work in the legal field. It was great fun to read it again now.
Diab
Ms. Wolfe did a perfect job. I love the pace of her writing. She says what needs to be said quickly without flowery descriptives. Her characters are very human and easy to be with. It most certainly helps to know what you write about. This book is a classic example. Highly recommend!
This is murder in a law office. There are lots of wily characters -- lawyers and their minions. Author has been there so the office politics are authentic. There were lots of funny moments of plotting & one-up-man-ship. I enjoyed this book and immediately looked for others by the same author but there do not seem to be any more, alas.

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