» » The Gods and Their Machines

Download The Gods and Their Machines fb2

by Oisin McGann

  • ISBN: 0765311593
  • Category: Teenagers
  • Author: Oisin McGann
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
  • Other formats: lrf txt docx doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tor Teen; 1st edition (November 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • FB2 size: 1369 kb
  • EPUB size: 1257 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 473
Download The Gods and Their Machines fb2

Oisin mcgann series: Small. Other author's books: The Gods and their Machines. Welcome to Gray City. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Oisin mcgann series: Small. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

The Gods and their Machines. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Oisín McGann (born 1973) is an Irish writer and illustrator. He writes in a range of genres for children and teenagers, mainly science fiction and fantasy, and has illustrated many of his own short story books for younger readers

Oisín McGann (born 1973) is an Irish writer and illustrator. He writes in a range of genres for children and teenagers, mainly science fiction and fantasy, and has illustrated many of his own short story books for younger readers. Oisín McGann was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1973 and spent most of his childhood living there and in Drogheda, County Louth.

Model animals, cotton-wool bushes and pipe-cleaner trees added a touch of nature to the environment.

Their suicide warr The Gods and Their Machines marks the debut of a compelling new voice in science fiction . Oisin now works full-time as a writer and illustrator. He lives somewhere in the Irish countryside, where he won’t be heard shouting at his computer.

Their suicide warr The Gods and Their Machines marks the debut of a compelling new voice in science fiction and fantasy, set in a world that bears a disturbing resemblance to the Middle East and the conflict between Israel and Palestine. To the scientifically advanced people of Altima, the primitive "Fringelanders" of Bartokhrin are superstitious barbarians and terrorists. Their suicide warriors carry dark magic into the heart of the Altiman cities, killing innocent civilians. Books by Oisin McGann.

A Tom Doherty Associates book. Trainee fighter pilot Chamus Aranson makes an emergency landing in enemy territory and his survival depends on Riadni, a tomboy who wants to become a soldier despite her nation's oppression of women, as Benyan, one of her countrymen, prepares to become a martyr dedicated to killing Chamus's grandfather. Volume II of The Archisan Tales. Taya and Lorkrin's shape-changing Myunan tribe faces an invasion by Noran, which is intent on mining the valuable iron ore from their sacred mountain, Absaleth

The Gods and their Machines. Taya and Lorkrin's shape-changing Myunan tribe faces an invasion by Noran, which is intent on mining the valuable iron ore from their sacred mountain, Absaleth. But the mountain is haunted and fights back with supernatural powers. Then a mine tunnel collapses and the miners are trapped.

Books related to The Gods and Their Machines. Chains of Honor: the Prequels (Tales 1-3).

Only the gods are real. that she wanted a puppy, but their landlord had pointed out they weren’t allowed pets under the terms of their lease. He had beaten the crap out of some guy who had made the mistake of copping a feel off his girlfriend in the bar where she danced and the Iceman bounced. Hey, Shadow had said, I’ll be your puppy. What do you want me to do?

The Gods and Their Machines marks the debut of a compelling new voice in science fiction and fantasy, set in a world that bears a disturbing resemblance to the Middle East and the conflict between Israel and Palestine. To the scientifically advanced people of Altima, the primitive "Fringelanders" of Bartokhrin are superstitious barbarians and terrorists. Their suicide warriors carry dark magic into the heart of the Altiman cities, killing innocent civilians. To the people of Bartokhrin, the Altimans are godless conquerors and oppressors, who bomb their town and villages from their high-flying aeroplanes. They revere the Blessed martyrs who carry the battle back to the Altimans.Chamus Aranson is a young Altiman student, training to be a fighter pilot in his nation's air force. Riadni Mocranen is a rebellious Bartokhrian tomboy, who dreams of joining the heroic freedom fighters in their crusade against Altima. Chamus and Riadni come from two completely different worlds, but when Chamus is forced to make and emergency landing deep in enemy country, Riadni becomes his only hope for survival. Now they must work together to stop an unimaginable catastrophe from setting both their worlds on fire.
Reviews about The Gods and Their Machines (5):
nailer
The Gods and Their Machines is a top notch young adult science fiction novel and an allegory for the viscous cycle of real life, modern day terrorism. The story is set on an unnamed planet where two nations are in a state of undeclared war that is carried out through terrorism. One side, the Altima, are technologically advanced for their planet, live in urban settings, and have a generally high standard of living. The Bartokhrin are technologically behind, poorer, and live in a rural, pastoral setting. Each have ugly stereotypes of the other, some of it deserved. The Bartokhrins are seen by the Altimans as backward, superstitious, barbaric people who carry out terrorist attacks in Altiman cities against innocent civilians without provocation. The Bartokhrin see the Altiman as a rich, spoiled, powerful people who have stripped and used Bartokhrin resources to the detriment of their ecology and economy. Not surprisingly, the Altiman carry out their campaign against the Bartokhrin using their superior power and technology. The Bartokhrin use terrorist tactics such as suicide bombers and assassination.

The story centers on two young people, Chamus Aranson, whose father and grandfather are politically powerful men in Altiman society and Riadni Mocranen, a rebellious young Bartokhrin tomboy who rebels against her father and naively goes off to join the terrorist movement in her state - the Hadram Cassal. Each of these young people have grown up socialized to hate the other and believe with religious passion the negative stereotypes of the others' people. They have also each experienced first hand the terror the others' society has inflicted upon their respective states. Chamus, on a flight training exercise, crashes into the "fringelands," the home of the Bartokhrin, where Riadni comes across him. Riadni shows her humanity by not turning him over to the Hassam Cassal who would surely hold him hostage and may eventually kill him, thus getting herself into trouble with this violent faction when they discover her deception. These two are thrown together in a situation where they must depend on each other to escape their circumstances and survive, while learning the truths, and untruths, about each other and their people.

What makes this an excellent novel is the clever way McGann pulls the curtain aside and shows how mostly false stereotypes and lack of understanding lead to the seemingly intractable hatred and tit-for-tat violence that rends these two different peoples apart. It's a perfect example of how modern day terrorism and systemic violence has torn apart the Middle East and Ireland, to name a few examples. But it goes further to show that there are nefarious and evil people on both sides of the conflict. Stereotypes aren't born in a vacuum, they inevitably have a kernel or more of truth to them. And the use of two young people thrown together in a life or death situation who have grown up to hate the other but still are open minded enough to learn about each other, however reluctantly, offers hope for the future of their society. This is the strength and heart of this novel.

There are a few minor drawbacks. Occasionally there are some inconsistencies on the part of the characters that are forgivable but noticeable. Another slight quibble is the author never explains, even briefly, the origins of this planet and it's obviously human citizens. Finally, at times, the story drags a little. But these are minor faults for well done first novel.
JoJogar
Altima is the dominant nation in the area with its advanced technology making it so "superior" to its neighbors. Altima depends on its backward neighbors for raw materials including cheap labor that are especially used in its highly sophisticated manufacturing sector.

The largest border nation is the fundamentally religious Bartokhrin, an agricultural society that treats females as subservient yet worships the Goddess Shanna. Most Bartokhrins detest their powerful secular neighbor. However a small group also loathes the ungodliness of Altima and has begun a terrorist war to rid Bartokhrin of all ties with Altima. Priests use the mortiphas effect to provide volunteers with negative psychic energies that convert them into living bombs to wreck Altima. As Altima plans to devastate Bartokhrin with a military assault, plots abound to assassinate leaders felt to soft on terrorism.

A terrorist attack kills the family of teenager Chamus Aranson, whose obsession to fly has changed to kill all Bartokhrins. While flying, he makes an emergency landing in Bartokhrin where he meets tomboy Riadni Mocranen, who is his only hope to elude captivity, but neither understands the values of the other.

THE GODS AND THEIR MACHINES is a terrific allegorical speculative fiction that grips the audience from the moment that readers grasp the radical differences between the two societies and never slows down until the final symbolic twist. The story line is action-packed and contains two delightfully daring diverse heroes. Still the parable makes this a compelling read as Oisin McGann has furbished a deep thought-provoking novel. Fans of several genres will reconsider the post 9/11 testosterone actions and reactions of country and terrorist leaders.

Harriet Klausner
Thorgaginn
I read The Gods & Their Machines after seeing a review that suggested it would be a good book for adults, too.

Well, maybe for somebody else, but.... This is a pretty decent debut novel, but it's *definitely * YA, and, I'd guess, of no great interest to most readers over 20. GODS is written in broad, obvious strokes, and marred by a slow start, some PC preachiness and a particularly silly explosive-psi plot-device. Still, once it gets moving, it's an OK action-adventure written with some subtlety, and has some well-drawn characters. A "C/C+" book, for me anyway --but I'd keep an eye out for future books from McGann, who shows promise.

Happy reading--
Peter D. Tillman
Kerry
This book works on so many levels that it is very difficult to categorise it. After reading the blurb I just assumed it would be transparent allegory of our modern world that would be fitting and perhaps enlightening reading for a young teenager. After a few pages I realised the disservice I had done Mr McGann. His debut novel does not simply act as a fable, but as a deep and searching exploration of fanaticism, dogmatism, stereotyping, simple human nature, and, of course, everyday human concerns. This book is one that I have started to use in my english classes. Less able students get an interesting and well written tale. Those with better grasp of the language are challenged and encouraged to think, ponder, and ultimately grow, thanks to this text.

Related to The Gods and Their Machines fb2 books: