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by Bill Felber

  • ISBN: 0312332653
  • Category: Sports books
  • Author: Bill Felber
  • Subcategory: Baseball
  • Other formats: lrf doc docx azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin (March 21, 2006)
  • Pages: 416 pages
  • FB2 size: 1154 kb
  • EPUB size: 1787 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 132
Download The Book on The Book: A Landmark Inquiry into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work fb2

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Start by marking The Book on The Book: A Landmark Inquiry . In the vein of the late Leonard Koppett and Bill James, Felber uses mathematical and statistical principles to evaluate the wisdom of standard baseball strategies.

Start by marking The Book on The Book: A Landmark Inquiry into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Illustrations and a refreshingly engaging style make The Book on the Book the new textbook of baseball analysis.

Felber (125 Years of Professional Baseball ) here offers a series of essays on baseball strategies, ranging from an analysis of player value to the impact of various ballparks on the performance.

Bill James, Felber uses mathematical and statistical principles to evaluate the wisdom of standard baseball strategies.

In the vein of the late Leonard Koppett and Bill James, Felber uses mathematical and statistical principles to evaluate the wisdom of standard baseball strategies. Illustrations and a refreshingly engaging style make "The Book on the Book" the new textbook of baseball analysis. No current Talk conversations about this book.

Book Overview to understanding the "tried and true" methodologies of the game of baseball.

The Book on the Book : An Inquiry into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work.

A Landmark Inquiry into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work. PART I THE GAME ON THE FIELD PREFACE TO PART I When Albert Spalding wrote one of the first histories of baseball in 1911, he deliberately sidestepped any discussion of strategies. St. Martin's Griffin. Praise for The Book on The Book. Well thought out and soundly based, this book could be used as a text for most current teams, who should be trying to keep up with those few enlightened ones that are using logic rather than guesswork and hope.

Manufacturer: Thomas Dunne Books Release date: 1 May 2005 ISBN-10 : 0312332645 ISBN-13: 9780312332648. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

An Inquiry into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work. Published March 21, 2006 by St. Statistics, Baseball.

Bill Felber is the author of several books, including The Book on the Book: A Landmark Inquiry into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work; Under Pallor, Under Shadow: The 1920 American League Pennant Race That Rattled and Rebuilt Baseball (Nebraska, 2011); an. .

Bill Felber is the author of several books, including The Book on the Book: A Landmark Inquiry into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work; Under Pallor, Under Shadow: The 1920 American League Pennant Race That Rattled and Rebuilt Baseball (Nebraska, 2011); and A Game of Brawl: The Orioles, the Beaneaters, and the Battle for the 1897 Pennant (Nebraska, 2014).

Felber, Bill (2006). The Book on the Book: An Inquiry Into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work. p. 102. ISBN 978-0-312-33265-5.

"Picking up where Michael Lewis left off in Moneyball, he addresses the central questions of risk, reward, and value---on the field and off---and reveals what it takes to win."---John Thorn, editor of Total Baseball

Die-hard fanatics will enjoy this comprehensive collection of groundbreaking baseball strategies, analyses, statistics, and studies

This unique approach to understanding the "tried and true" methodologies of the game of baseball examines conventional elements like the steal, hit and run, and line-up construction. The Book on The Book offers an exciting critique of baseball by placing an actual dollar value on player performance and rating managers based on their on-field moves to determine who are the smartest tacticians.

No corner of the ballpark is left unturned as author Bill Felber explores the various methods of team-building, on-field values of players, the role and influence of the general manager in team success, and the importance of park effects. In the vein of the late Leonard Koppett and Bill James, Felber uses mathematical and statistical principles to evaluate the wisdom of standard baseball strategies. Illustrations and a refreshingly engaging style make The Book on The Book the new textbook of baseball analysis.

"Full-blown fanatics will probably read the book straight through, but casual fans will find plenty of reward simply browsing through selected chapters, such as ‘The Decline and Fall of the Starting Pitcher,' ‘Highly Paid Irrelevance,' and ‘Rating the General Managers.' "---BookPage

"Well thought out and soundly based, this book could be used as a text for most current teams, who should be trying to keep up with those few enlightened ones that are using logic rather than guesswork and hope." ---Pete Palmer, coeditor of The ESPN Baseball Encyclopedia and coauthor of The Hidden Game of Baseball

"Baseball's ‘Book'---the ever-expanding cloud of common wisdom about how the game should be played---has resisted challenge in part because it is unwritten. Ever since baseball began, experts have not been reading from the same page, let alone the same book. But now Bill Felber comes along to poke holes in the clouds and let some sunshine in." ---John Thorn, editor of Total Baseball


Reviews about The Book on The Book: A Landmark Inquiry into Which Strategies in the Modern Game Actually Work (5):
Ionzar
I first looked at the reviews of this book after I'd already ordered it. I'm glad I didn't read the reviews first; their uniformly negative ratings might have put me off getting the book. I disagree strongly with these evaluations.

The book didn't seem that tedious to me; perhaps the reviewers were looking for something different from what the author was trying to do. The author is trying to present his conclusions on baseball strategy, not just as it needs to be used by players, but also by managers and by front-office people who might decide who should be signed and how much they should be paid. This latter part hasn't been addressed by anyone else that I know.

Some of his conclusions on on-the-field strategy may be identical to conclusions already reached by such baseball analysts as Pete Palmer. This doesn't make it less valuable that he enunciate them and give his reasoning. And some of his conclusions are new, or contrary to what other analysts have decided. That's why you want to read other books, not just this one, and come to your own conclusions.

One of the other reviewers seems to think everything Felber states is obvious. I think that some things are -- it is certainly more likely that you will strike out if you already have two strikes against you than if the count is 2-1. But what Felber is trying to do is quantify the chances, so that one can come up with a strategy for swinging/taking, and the very fact that his conclusions run counter than the usual strategies certainly means that managers don't think his conclusions are obvious.

My take on this book is that it is a valuable addition to my library, unlike the other reviews' ratings, though I certainly would not use this as my only book on the subject.
Faehn
I was really hoping for a fresh, new take on an old topic. But instead, it seems that "The Book on the Book" merely regurgitated the work already done by Palmer and Thorn over 20 years ago.

The author does not appear to have a background in statistics or logical thinking, and unfortunately it shows. On subjects such as the sacrifice bunt, for example, he draws conclusions without analyzing game situations or the quality of the hitter at the plate. Folks at web sites like Baseball Prospectus, Hardball Times and Baseball Analysts have covered this topic in much more extensive detail, thus delivering more meaningful conclusions.
Scoreboard Bleeding
A disappointing purchase, this cannot be the last word on the subject. The book is a pretty dry read. Bill James has printed similar types of essays in various books in a much more lively and entertaining style. Also, some of the methods used and assumptions made are very questionable. (I am an MBA with over 20 years experience in compiling and using statistical data.) Felber's book can only be recommended to the really hardcore fan who is willing to wade through a lot of really boring prose.
Ericaz
While I was reading this book I brought it into work one day and a co-worker (an avid Mets fan) asked me what the book was about. I explained it breaks down baseball strategies and ideologies. He said it sounded kind of tedious. I replied it was at times, but at the time I was still working my way through it. In fact, this book is very tedious. Felber lost me when he said that Grady Little faced a very difficult decision in the 2003 ALCS when he went to the mound to talk with Pedro Martinez. He discusses how many times a tiring ace pitcher can be a better choice than a fresh reliever and gives some examples. He completely ignored the fact that Martinez's OPS against jumps over 300 points after 100 pitches.

"The Book on The Book", as previously mentioned in Brian A. Powell's review, is an extremely dry read. I also noticed two errors in the book: Misspelling Sidney Ponson's first name "Sydney" and referring to the umpire monitoring device Questec as "Questrec." All in all, not worth a read.
Keramar
This book presents a lot of information in an uninteresting way and doesn't break any new ground.

One of the first chapters by Felber states that the best hitters hit early in the count as once hitters have worked themselves into 2-strike counts, their batting averages drop sharply.

Of course they do. That's because with 2 strikes, you can strike out on the next pitch. With 0 or 1 strike, a batter can do a lot of things with the next pitch, but one of them isn't striking out. And striking out is the end result of a lot of at bats.

The chapter on bullpen usage makes some sense, but the examples given are presented poorly.

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