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by Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh

  • ISBN: 0141007656
  • Category: Religious books
  • Author: Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh
  • Other formats: mbr azw txt lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (April 15, 2003)
  • Pages: 258 pages
  • FB2 size: 1437 kb
  • EPUB size: 1169 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 432
Download The Name of My Beloved: Verses of the Sikh Gurus fb2

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. So happy to find a modern translation of some key Sikh verses. Hope she gets funding to translate the whole Adi Granth and Dasam Granths.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Name of My Beloved: Verses of the Sikh Gurus as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh is the Chair of the Department of Religious Studies and Crawford Family Professor at Colby College

Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh is the Chair of the Department of Religious Studies and Crawford Family Professor at Colby College. Professor Nikky Singh was born in India, and came to attend Stuart Hall, a Girls’ Preparatory School in Virginia.

The Name of My Beloved: Verses of the Sikh Gurus (Sacred Literature Series). In the Department of Religious Studies at Colby College, Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh is Chair and Crawford Family Professor of Religious Studies. She is the author of several books, including The Feminine Principle in the Sikh Vision of the Transcendent.

Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh is the Crawford Family Professor of Religious Studies and Chair of the department at Colby College, Waterville, Maine. She is Co-Chair of the Sikh Studies Section of the American Academy of Religion

Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh is the Crawford Family Professor of Religious Studies and Chair of the department at Colby College, Waterville, Maine. She is Co-Chair of the Sikh Studies Section of the American Academy of Religion. Her books include The Guru Granth Sahib: its Physics and Metaphysics (1981), The Feminine Principle in the Sikh Vision of the Transcendent (1993) and The Name of My Beloved: Verses of the Sikh Gurus (2001).

Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh. Almost from the moment, some five centuries ago, that their religion was founded in the Punjab by Guru Nanak, Sikhs have enjoyed a distinctive identity.

Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh was born in India, and went to Stuart Hall, a. .

Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh was born in India, and went to Stuart Hall, a Girls' Preparatory School in the US. The book is divided into eight chapters which approach the Sikh vision of the Transcendent from historical, scriptural, symbolic, mythological, romantic, existential, ethical, and mystical perspectives. The Name of My Beloved: Verses of the Sikh Gurus translated by Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh is the first contemporary English translation of hymns from the Guru Granth Sahib-the principal sacred text of the Sikh religion- and the Dasam Granth, the poetry of the tenth Sikh guru.

The author has done a great task in translating various verses and prayers from the Guru Granth Sahib, the holy book of the Sikhs. Her modern day translation provide a deep insight and sheds light. com/sikh library/english.

Nikky Singh has published extensively in the field of Sikhism, including The Feminine Principle in the Sikh Vision of the . Professional Information

Nikky Singh has published extensively in the field of Sikhism, including The Feminine Principle in the Sikh Vision of the Transcendent (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), The Name of My Beloved: Verses of the Sikh Gurus (HarperCollins and Penguin), Metaphysics and Physics of the Guru Granth Sahib (Sterling). Her book on Sikhism was translated into Japanese. Professional Information. Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh was born in India, and went to Stuart Hall, a Girls' Preparatory School in the USA. She received her BA in Philosophy and Religion from Wellesley College, her MA from the University of Pennsylvania, and her PhD from Temple University. Reference work entry. Singh N-GK (2001) The name of my beloved: verses of the Sikh gurus. Penguin, New DelhiGoogle Scholar. First Online: 31 October 2017. Any complete reading of the Guru Granth Sahib commences and concludes with the congregation joining in their singing, which is followed by the distribution of karah parshad, the warm dish prepared with butter, flour, water, and sugar.

Sikh Foundation Sacred Literature Series. xv, 250 pp. San Francisco: HarperCollins, 1996. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 05 February 2009. Export citation Request permission. Your name Please enter your name. Who would you like to send this to?

Presenting authoritative and powerful selections of hymns and prayers from the Guru Granth Sahib--the principal sacred texts of the Sikhs. In English for the first time, this easily accessible, gender neutral translation reflects the rich and inclusive tone of this heretofore esoteric Sikh literature.
Reviews about The Name of My Beloved: Verses of the Sikh Gurus (2):
Yndanol
I am astonished that this book doesn't have numerous five star ratings! In college I started out as a student of religion and in one of my independent studies classes I endeavored to read all of the primary scriptures of the world's religions. This book was hands down my most delightful experience outside of my own Christian tradition. Part of the reason for my delight may be the fact that the Sikhism is the youngest of the world's religions and has a sweeping poetic approach to religion. I loved the poetry of this text. It jumped of the page for me.
-Amos Smith (author of Healing The Divide: Recovering Christianity's Mystic Roots)
Meztisho
This is a beautiful translation that flows like poetry for the english-speaking person. Here's also one for us girls!

At first I wasn't sure about the sound of the translation, but when became familiar with the rhythm and style of writing, the flow and beauty blossomed to me.

It is brilliant to have a gender-neutral translation to read! I find myself becoming absorbed in the meaning of the hymns without constantly being bothered by masculine terms like "Lord", "Him" and "His". I believe Nikky Guninder Kaur Singh has achieved her goal of bringing what is usually translated with very culture-specific idioms to the Western reader in a very prayer-friendly way. It does not stop mid-sentence to explain what a particular word or phrase means and why it has been used thus breaking the meditative reading as other translations do.

I can only hope one day for this translation to be made into a beautiful sundar gutka (small prayer book).

The book contains the following hymns: Japji, Shabad Hazare, Jaap, Savayye, Rehiras including Chaupai Benati, Kirtan Sohila, Lavan, Barah Maha, Shaloks of the Ninth Guru and Sukhmani (yes, the entire Sukhmani!). Also contains Ardas.

I would highly recommend this book to any Westerner or english-speaking person trying to find sweet-sounding Sikh hymns in English!

Here is a sample of translation style:

Shaloks of the Ninth Guru (Sri Guru Granth Sahib p. 1426):
Unless we sing divine praise
our life passes in vain;
Says Nanak, love the Divine, my mind,
as a fish loves water.

Why are we caught in worldly delights?
Why can't we be free for a moment?
Says Nanak, love the Divine, my mind;
be saved from the snare of death.

And a piece of Sukhmani (Sri Guru Granth Sahib p. 262):
Remember, Remember the One whose remembrance brings peace
And dispels pain and sorrow from the body.
Remember the One who alone upholds the universe,
Whose Name is contemplated by millions.
The auspicious words of all Vedas, Puranas and Smritis
Arise from the single Word of the divine Name.
They who possess even one jot of Your Name
Are great beyond telling.
They who yearn only for a vision of You,
Says Nanak, I seek liberation in their company.

Compare if you will to the high-quality but gender specific translation of the same passage supplied by [...]
Meditate, meditate, meditate in remembrance of Him, and find peace.
Worry and anguish shall be dispelled from your body.
Remember in praise the One who pervades the whole Universe.
His Name is chanted by countless people, in so many ways.
The Vedas, the Puraanas and the Simritees, the purest of utterances,
were created from the One Word of the Name of the Lord.
That one, in whose soul the One Lord dwells -
the praises of his glory cannot be recounted.
Those who yearn only for the blessing of Your Darshan -
Nanak: save me along with them! ||1||

Thank you for reading my review. I hope it has been helpful to you.

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