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by Prods Oktor Skjærvø

  • ISBN: 0300170351
  • Category: Religious books
  • Author: Prods Oktor Skjærvø
  • Subcategory: Other Eastern Religions & Sacred Texts
  • Other formats: docx mobi txt lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (February 7, 2012)
  • Pages: 280 pages
  • FB2 size: 1330 kb
  • EPUB size: 1261 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 319
Download The Spirit of Zoroastrianism fb2

This book provides an excellent introduction to the sacred texts of Zoroastrianism, as well a brief overview of its beliefs and rituals.

Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). This book provides an excellent introduction to the sacred texts of Zoroastrianism, as well a brief overview of its beliefs and rituals. The first section of the book (comprising roughly 40 of the 260 pages of the book) introduces the background and history of the religion and its texts, as well as summarising a variety of aspects of Zoroastrian belief including Creation and cosmology, gods and demons, Eschatology, the relationship between body and soul(s), and ethics in clear and simple terms.

Introduction to Zoroastrianism. by Prods Oktor Skjærvø. This book is useful for the later history of the Zoroastrians

Introduction to Zoroastrianism. For use in Early Iranian Civilizations 102 (Divinity School no. 3663a). This book is useful for the later history of the Zoroastrians. The description of Zoroastrianism reflects the author's personal beliefs and should be read with a critical mind and a large dose of sound skepticism. Duchesne-Guillemin, . 1962, La religion de l’Iran ancien, Paris. Even if somewhat outdated this is a classical introduction to ancient Iranian religion.

Faculty member page, Harvard University. Curriculum vitae of Prods Oktor Skjaervo.

This book provides an excellent introduction to the sacred texts of Zoroastrianism, as well a brief overview of its beliefs and rituals.

The Spirit of Zoroastrianism book. Books by Prods Oktor Skjærvø

This book is useful for the later history of the Zoroastrians.

This book is useful for the later history of the Zoroastrians.

The Spirit of Zoroastrianism. 1 About the book of Dēnkard (Dēnkard III, 420). The writtenDēnkardis a section of what is manifest in the Mazdayasnian Tradition, which is adorned with the knowledge of all things. Firstly, there are extracts from the good Tradition of the Teachers of Old, the first pupils of Zarathustra of the Spitāmas, who brought the Word containing the knowledge (dānishn) and awareness (āgāhīh) of all issues as manifested in the good Tradition and obtained by Zarathustra by asking and listening to Ohrmazd, like light from the original Light.

Zoroastrianism is one of the world's oldest religions, though it is not among the . Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Zoroastrianism is one of the world's oldest religions, though it is not among the best understood. As one of the world's great religions, Zoroastrianism has a heritage rich in texts and cultic practices. The Spirit Of Zoroastrianism.

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Zoroastrianism is one of the world's oldest religions, though it is not among the best understood. Originating with Iranian tribes living in Central Asia in the second millennium BCE, Zoroastrianism was the official religion of the Iranian empires until Islam superseded it in the seventh century AD. Centered on the worship of Ahura Mazda, the All-knowing Ruler, Zoroastrianism follows the practices and rituals set out by the prophet Zarathustra, according to the indigenous tradition.

As one of the world's great religions, Zoroastrianism has a heritage rich in texts and cultic practices. The texts are often markedly difficult to translate, but in this volume, Prods Oktor Skjærvø, professor of ancient Iranian languages and culture at Harvard, provides modern and accurate translations of Zoroastrian texts that have been selected to provide an overview of Zoroastrian beliefs and practices. In a comprehensive introduction to these sacred texts, Skjærvø outlines the history and essence of Zoroastrianism and discusses the major themes of this the first fully representative selection of Zoroastrian texts to be made available in English for over a century.


Reviews about The Spirit of Zoroastrianism (7):
Invissibale
This a rather concise anthology of important Zoroasrtian texts translated from Avestan, Old Persian, and Pahlavi to English. The author, Prods O. Skjaervo, is one of the world's leading experts in Zoroastriamism, Iranian Studies, and Iranian languages so this book couldn't be any more indisputable. The book gives concise introductions to Zoroastrian sacred tests, theology, history, and ethics. The other chapters are devoted to newly or translated for the first time English renditions of influential texts. From the source itself the Avesta to stone inscriptions from the Sasanian period. Other very useful features this book contains is a glossary, list of texts, and a superb bibliography for further study.

My complaint is why with Pf. Skajaervo's expertise and a field full of brillant Zoroastian scholars, there is no complete English translation of the Avesta and Pahlavi texts? A critical edition is never going to happen but at least a general full tranlslation would be of great importance. As a student with a specialization in Zoroastrian and Central Asian studies, I wonder why my professors aren't planning of doing a full translation. There has not been a full English translation for over 100 years! What's the hold up? While this book is very valuable, wouldn't it be easier to just make a full translation rather than publish occassional snippets or portions of these texts? Anyway, that was my rant of the matter but I strongly recommend this book to students and scholars who need concise introductions to texts and the bibliography for further study.
Manris
A concise and well written text on an ancient prophet in Persia.
Nicanagy
good reading
Abandoned Electrical
It's a pretty basic introduction to the subject with plenty of original literature from various sources, though I wish it offer some more insights on its overall structure of the the topic and what the outlines of its basic philosophical aspects and how they formed up
Gardall
Prior to reading this book, I had encountered many references to the ideas and texts of the Zoroastrian religion, mostly in relation to the Vedic religion and mythology (with which early Zoroastrianism shares much in common), as well as with regard to its influence on the beliefs of the Hebrew and early Christian religions. However, as many of these references are often presented in passing and with very little context or explanation of Zoroastrianism, I was searching for a book that would provide me with a fairly simple overview of the topic before I explored the religion further.

This book provides an excellent introduction to the sacred texts of Zoroastrianism, as well a brief overview of its beliefs and rituals. The first section of the book (comprising roughly 40 of the 260 pages of the book) introduces the background and history of the religion and its texts, as well as summarising a variety of aspects of Zoroastrian belief including Creation and cosmology, gods and demons, Eschatology, the relationship between body and soul(s), and ethics in clear and simple terms.

The remainder of the book contains modern translations of various Zoroastrian texts, from both the older and younger Avesta (including the Yasnas, Gathas, Yashts and Vendidad) as well as number of later inscriptions and Pahlavi texts (i.e. Middle-Persian, around 9th-11th century CE). These texts are arranged by topic in order to correspond with the subjects introduced in the book's first section and are organised together according to their source (Old Avesta, Young Avesta, Pahlavi text, etc), which is both highly convenient and easy to read.

With regard to the criticism expressed in C. Dalrymple's review on this site, most of the reviewer's questions are answered by Professor Skjaervo in the preface and editorial notes in the first few pages of the book, and are further explained throughout.

For example, because this book is part of "The Sacred Literature Series" by Yale Univerity Press, Skjaervo points out that "the size of the book was limited, and I decided texts were more important", rather than filling it with excessive notes and discussions. Skjaervo states that "All the translations are my own, although I have, of course, consulted existing translations and discussions", and provides a list of resources, both books and online, for further reading on Zoroastrian texts, history and religion. In numerous places he points out where translations are uncertain or contested and lists the possible or most likely equivalents. As Professor Skjaervo has been a teacher of Old Iranian languages, literature and religion for a number of decades, I feel he is qualified for the task.

Further, Dalrymple's issue with Zoroastrianism being viewed as polytheistic and the question of Zoroaster's authorship stems from the simple fact that Zoroastrian belief and texts have a history of at least 3000 years, and as such has undergone many transformations and evolutions over the centuries. For example, we see how the old Vedic gods Indra, Sharva (Shiva) and Nasatyas from around 1500-1000 BCE are transformed centuries later and emerge as the evil "demons" Indar, Sawul and Nanghaiyth. In addition, what we call 'gods' or 'deities' are more commonly referred to as 'lords' or 'spirits' in this tradition, which can be confusing for some more used to Western theology.

Lastly, the reviewer's comments about Zoroaster's authorship in parts of the Avesta and the analogy of contesting the authorship of the Bible - we find precisely this kind of reaction to the recent scholarship and archaeology which demonstrates the polytheistic nature ancient Israel (see Israel Finkelstein, William Dever, Mark S. Smith, etc) and the unlikelihood that the Pentateuch was authored by Moses himself (the 'Documentary' hypothesis). If such critical scholarship offends you, I'd recommend avoiding books such as this one.

All in all, a great, simple introduction to the texts and beliefs of Zoroastrian. If you are looking for a more in-depth examination and discussion, I would recommend books by Jenny Rose and Mary Boyce.
Rude
Mostly I would notice the elements of rodeo clown personality in preachings of the first prophet on the need to find grass to preserve the order of the all-knowing one. The early scriptures have the form of prayer, even in the desire to win against hostilities. In later inscriptions, Yasna 43, I quote:

I now see you at the rebirth of the new existence,
as when you established, for the first time,
actions as fee-earning,
as well as the words that are to be uttered,
and established a bad reward for the bad
and a good one for the good (p. 125).
Ausstan
waste of time - waste of money
I absolutely disagree with C. Dalrymple. This is a great book. If by controversy he means scientific method vs blind religious belief, there is not much to say about his comment. A great book, easy to read for both beginners and more experienced. If you are familiar with the works of Professor Skjaervo you know you wont be disappointed.

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