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by Evan John Jones,Michael Howard,Robert Cochrane

  • ISBN: 1861631553
  • Category: Religious books
  • Author: Evan John Jones,Michael Howard,Robert Cochrane
  • Subcategory: New Age & Spirituality
  • Other formats: lit mobi rtf doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Capall Bann Pub (September 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 210 pages
  • FB2 size: 1927 kb
  • EPUB size: 1484 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 630
Download The Roebuck in the Thicket: An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Witchcraft Tradition fb2

The writings of Evan John Jones generally are more pagan and operant in nature. Born in 1931, Robert Cochranewas born and he grew up in the slums of London

The writings of Evan John Jones generally are more pagan and operant in nature. These cover outlines and discussions of various rituals, symbolism of tools, etc. In general, as a non-Witch, I found these less interesting. Later in the book, however, Jones turns back to discussing Cochrane's philosophy, life, and death, and in these essays something deep is touched upon. Born in 1931, Robert Cochranewas born and he grew up in the slums of London. By his pown admission to William Grey, a ceremonial magician, Robert Cochrane had a violent temper. He ran through a variety of careers. He started off as a blacksmith then went on to run barges on the river.

Roebuck in the Thicket Evaan John Hones, Capall Bann Sept 22,2002. Michael Howard's introduction is grand as well. This book is an awesome little book. Every page is chock filled with information. Robert Cochrane is one of the most fascinating, yet enigmatic figures in the modern Witchcraft Revival, he died young, in 1966, wrote no books, left a few articles in occult journals of his day, a handful of letters, yet his Clan of Tubal Cain survived, and from them the 1734 Tradition in the . This is an anthology of those articles and letters. They differ greatly from Gardnerian and Alexandrian Wicca.

Robert Cochrane (26 January 1931 – 3 July 1966), who was born as Roy Bowers, was an English occultist who founded the tradition of Pagan Witchcraft known as Cochrane's Craft. He founded one coven, but it soon collapsed.

Robert Cochrane was one of the most fascinating and enigmatic figures in the history of the modern witchcraft revival. He claimed a family witchcraft tradition going back to the 17th century and also claimed that he had been taught the Craft by a family member. He claimed a family witchcraft tradition going back to the 17th century and also claimed that he had been taught the Craft by a family member

Robert Cochrane was one of the most fascinating and enigmatic figures in the history of the modern witchcraft revival.

in the Thicket : An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Tradition. Evan John Jones, By (author) Robert Cochrane, By (author) Michael Howard.

The Roebuck in the Thicket : An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Tradition. By (author) Evan John Jones, By (author) Robert Cochrane, By (author) Michael Howard. We can notify you when this item is back in stock. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

The Roebuck in the Thicket: An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Witchcraft Tradition contains a few . However most of the book comes from the pen of Evan John Jones, the heir to Cochrane’s tradition so to speak.

The Roebuck in the Thicket: An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Witchcraft Tradition contains a few Cochrane penned magazine articles, including a terrific article entitled The Witches’ Esbat from New Dimensions magazine back in 1964 (online here). Where Cochrane is cryptic Jones is blunt and to the point and he makes the ideas behind Cochrane’s Traditional Witchcraft easy to grasp and utilize.

Describing Cochrane's creation of his Witchcraft tradition, Oates remarked that "Like any true craftsman, he. .A stang is a forked staff used, primarily, as a portable altar

Describing Cochrane's creation of his Witchcraft tradition, Oates remarked that "Like any true craftsman, he was able to mold raw material into a magical synthesis, creating a marvelous working system, at once instinctively true and intrinsically beautiful. As in most forms of Neopagan Witchcraft, Cochranians worship both a Horned God and a Triple Goddess. A stang is a forked staff used, primarily, as a portable altar. In The Roebuck in the Thicket, Evan John Johns describes the acquisition and adornment of a stang intended for use by a coven.

Evan John Jones, Robert Cochra. Are you sure you want to remove The Roebuck in the Thicket from your list?

Evan John Jones, Robert Cochra. The Roebuck in the Thicket. Are you sure you want to remove The Roebuck in the Thicket from your list? The Roebuck in the Thicket. An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Witchcraft Tradition. by Evan John Jones, Robert Cochrane. Published September 2002 by Capall Bann Pub.

Among these was Evan John Jones, who would later become an author upon the subject of pagan witchcraft. The Roebuck in the Thicket: An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Witchcraft Tradition. Chapter One. ^ Oates 2010. p. 228. Contemporary witchcraft.

Among these was Evan John Jones, who would later become an author upon the subject of pagan witchcraft The group performed their rituals either at Cochrane's house, or, more often, at Burnham Beeches, though they also performed rituals at the South Downs, after which they would stay the night at Doreen Valiente's flat in Brighton.

Contains information about Robert Cochrane, his coven - The Clan of Tubal Cain, their ritual, teachings and beliefs and his workings written by himself to Evan John Jones, with additional writings by Evan John Jones.
Reviews about The Roebuck in the Thicket: An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Witchcraft Tradition (7):
you secret
This book consists of three basic parts: An introduction which includes a biography of Robert Cochrane, a few writings of Cochrane's, and a larger number of writings by Evan John Jones. These come out of the Tubal Cain Witchcraft tradition.

I found the biography and introduction to be quite interesting in its own right. There isn't a lot to be said here except that it covers the basic outlines of Cochrane's life and his controversies, giving a picture of depth to the man and his works.

The writings of Cochrane himself, I found interesting to ponder as philosophy generally. His concepts of truth, magic, fate, the Gods, etc. are quite a bit different than I have come across in the neopagan scene, and indeed Cochrane certainly did not consider himself to be neopagan.

The writings of Evan John Jones generally are more pagan and operant in nature. These cover outlines and discussions of various rituals, symbolism of tools, etc. In general, as a non-Witch, I found these less interesting.

Later in the book, however, Jones turns back to discussing Cochrane's philosophy, life, and death, and in these essays something deep is touched upon.

Highly recommended.
Voodoozragore
Very encyclopaedic treatment on the writings of Robert Cochrane, though he did not publish any books on his tradition he did leave behind letters and other writings dealing with his philosophy. One might say that he did open up to the general public the somewhat closed and secretive path of traditional witchcraft. Mike Howard, editor of The Cauldron did a splendid job in putting this collection of writings under one cover. Recommended.
asAS
For those interested in 1734/Tubal Cain/ Robert Cochrane, and some of the traditional craft, this is a good anthology. The ideas are deeper than most of what you find printed in the Neo-pagan genre, although the text could have used better editing. It is refreshing to read a text that discusses one of our elders frankly in a respectful manner, but without hero worship. The ideas and practices in this book have merit on their own accord, regardless of the personalities who transmit them. I wish more occult books let the philosophy and praxis stand on its own and stopped tying it to the authority of the transmitter. There is no religion higher than Truth.
Puchock
This book is an awesome little book. Every page is chock filled with information. The book covers everything about the Clan of Tubal Caine and Robert Cochrane. Starting with a brief biography of Cochrane's life it goes all the way through philosophy,history and rituals.

Born in 1931, Robert Cochranewas born and he grew up in the slums of London. By his pown admission to William Grey, a ceremonial magician, Robert Cochrane had a violent temper. He ran through a variety of careers. He started off as a blacksmith then went on to run barges on the river. The river folks used many craft motifs such as the rose. Cochrane would later become a type face setter. While leading his clan or coven Robert Cochrane always believed that pagans and witches were not necessarily the same. Cochrane also made the controversial statement that he was descended from witches. It was his grandparents converted from the witch religion to Methodist christianity. They would be cursed by the great grandfather. This was on his father's side. after his father passed on his mother let him in on the family secret. He as trained by his aunt Lucy. Before starting the Clan of Tubal Caine he was trained in other Family Traditions. He would write for the publication belong to Witchcraft Research association under the pen name , John Math. Cochrane had a major Feud with Gerald Gardner, the founder of Wicca. He claimed tht Gardner was a charlatan and a fraud. Cochrane also made other claimss. Such claims were that pagan season festivals went out in the 12th to 13th century. it was also in the 12 century that Middle Eastern influences became prevalent. Before this time Catholicism and paganism were able to live side by side. After that the Catholics persecuted the pagan and witches.

The 1734 movement was based on correspondences between Cochrane and Joe Wilson. The tradition was brought to the United States. In 1989 the Finnins started the ancient keltic church which recieved tax exempt status. There was a lot of curiosity as to what 1734 meant. It pertained to the nature and attributes of the Goddess. Many of Cochrane's groups did not believe many of the claims that Cochrane made. one of the most famous instances revolves around a copper plate that he recieved from Doreeen Valiente. In the news he claimed it was an ancient keepsake from his family. This deception clearly annoyed Doreen Valiente. She made a good record of Cohrane's rituals. Often times they had a big fire and would dance around it chanting.

His clans theology was different from Wicca. At the head of his pantheon was a great mother goddess who was totally unknowable. She would give birth to the witch goddess and the horned god. The witch goddess was known ass the maiden, mother and crone. she was also linked to the three sisters of fate or wyrd. The witch goddess could go by three different names ; Hecate, Diana and Artemis. The male or horned god was the god of fire, magic and the underworld. He was associated with Bran,Wayland and Herne. In Cochrane's tradition he was called Tubal Cain. When these two coupled they ended up giving birth to seven god and goddesses,they corresponded to the seven planetery bodies. Each one was in charge of his or her own world. Four of them had control over the four elements.

Cochrane was often vague and his statement were difficult to prove whether they were true or false. This is what Cochrane believed in and it was called Grey Magic. The idea behind this was to never let someone be able to confirm their opinion about him. He also believed that what started out as deceit or illusion would eventually become real.

Cochrane's system of witchcraft had a unique way of casting a circle. The altar faced north and the stang which also was in the north represented the horn god. This was the gateway to the spirit world. The stang was garlanded with different flowers pending on the season. it was also crossed with arrows and libations could be left at it's base. Circle casting was done in a deosil direction going North to North. The Northern Direction was governed by the old hag, the east by the young horned god, the south by the maiden, and the west by the old horned god. These were invoked when casting the circle.

The author Evan John Jones believes that there is no unbroken or true tradition of witchcraft. There is no purity just pieces left over from the past and reconstructed. If a group or individual learned up on enough knowledge and was dedicated to finding the truth could forge their own system and initiation and it would be valid to the goddess. The system also believed that mankind were active agents of creation. After death each group of people and religion created their own after life which member of the clan went to after they passed on. After the after life the people would reincarnate. Rituals gave form to worship. When active in the craft there were several form of vision; poetic vision- inward access to dream images and symbol, vision of memory- Past life remembrance, magic was vision of the triad. Religious vision gave one access to godhead.Mystical vision was unification with godhead.

The Roebuck in the thicket was a symbol of sacrifice. In old Britain when a roebuck was killed it's head was posted on a pole. something was placed in it's mouth. This was meant as a sacrifice to the old god. The morning and evening stars were also ways of telling time. The symbol of the Rose was symbolic of things hidden.

For such a short book this is really comprehensive. This lengthy review only covers part of it. If you read this and are serious about the craft you will refer to it many times. This book gets a 5/5
Winn
Beautiful glimpse into the world of the Traditional Witch! If you are "starved" for some "real food" and tired of a "cotton candy" diet of so-called witchcraft books, you may enjoy this! It is not a "how to" book, but more like reading the private diary of a Traditional Witch, as well as being filled with much wisdom. While no books can take the place of experiencing the Old Ones personally, this book does a nice little job of introducing one to the world of the Witch.
I have a great fondness for it and think every Witch who follows the Ways of Old should have a copy to call their own!
If only there were more like these...
Bolanim
For those interested in British Traditional Craft, this is a must-read. Not only is the content important from a historical perspective, but you will find it insightful as well. There's just enough context given for the reader to understand the articles' place in history, while allowing the reader to draw their own conclusions about the meanings behind their words. Only complaint is that there are a few typos.
Der Bat
I was expecting more information of how to perform rituals, and after reading a few pages, my eyes seem to tell me" close the cover".Indeed, this is not as what I expected. For a price like this, I could have spent more on others that offer more substance,

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