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by Chas S. Clifton

  • ISBN: 0759102023
  • Category: Religious books
  • Author: Chas S. Clifton
  • Subcategory: New Age & Spirituality
  • Other formats: azw lrf docx lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: AltaMira Press; 60491st edition (June 8, 2006)
  • Pages: 206 pages
  • FB2 size: 1449 kb
  • EPUB size: 1996 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 634
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But here in Her Hidden Children Chas Clifton tells many never-before-told stories of the origins of Paganism and . In Clifton's book, Her Hidden Children, the author uses words like "purported" instead of reported or claimed.

But here in Her Hidden Children Chas Clifton tells many never-before-told stories of the origins of Paganism and Wicca in the United States. The people, publications, and organizations that allowed Paganism and Wicca to set roots down in American soil and become "nature religion" are revealed in delicious detail. The word purported is far from objective, as is the word "liar" which the author also uses when referring to certain figures in Wicca and Witchcraft today.

Chas S. Clifton's Her Hidden Children is a pioneering look at the history of Neopagan religions in the . Chas Clifton has chosen with this book to lay down some basic parameters for talking about modern Pagan history in America

Chas S. Written with the sensitivity and humor of an insider and the dispassion of an outsider, it traces the early development of one of the fastest-growing religious movements in America today, and its uniquely American use of the trope of "nature" to. create its identity. This book should be invaluable to scholars of religion, American Studies, and the burgeoning field of Pagan Studies. Chas Clifton has chosen with this book to lay down some basic parameters for talking about modern Pagan history in America. He has done yeoman's work here and should be highly praised.

Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America is a historical study of Wicca and Contemporary Paganism in the United States

Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America is a historical study of Wicca and Contemporary Paganism in the United States. It was written by the American academic Chas S. Clifton of Colorado State University-Pueblo, and published by AltaMira Press in 2005.

Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca And Contemporary Paganism in America.

Her Hidden Children examines the historical development of American Wicca and the broader Pagan movement. Together, these two combine to constitute what is likely the fastest growing new religious movement in the United States today.

So begins Chas Clifton’s Her Hidden Children: The Rise of. .

So begins Chas Clifton’s Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America. As Clifton notes in his preface, this book is indeed the first of its kind: a history of the Wiccan and modern Pagan (or Neopagan) movement in the United States from the 1950s to the present. He became interested in Wicca and Paganism while an undergraduate in 1972 and has maintained a strong interest ever since. Writing the history of Wicca and Paganism is difficult because most participants were (and are) solitaries who did not practice their religion with others.

Her Hidden Children book. But here in Her Hidden Children Chas Clifton tells many never-before-told stories of the origins of Paganism and Wicca in the Un The history of any religious movement can get murky. The history of any religious movement can get murky  . But the history of American Paganism-with so many invented lineages, so many solitary practitioners, so much resistance to staid definition, so much hiddenness-is especially hard to decipher. But here in Her Hidden Children Chas Clifton tells many never-before-told stories of the origins of Paganism and Wicca in the United States.

Clifton’s is a book that could enliven courses in popular culture, as well as. courses in religion. Clifton, Chas S. (2006). Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America. Oxford and Lanham: AltaMira. ISBN 978-0-7591-0202-6.

But here in Her Hidden Children Chas Clifton tells many never-before-told stories of the origins of Paganism and Wicca in the United States

But here in Her Hidden Children Chas Clifton tells many never-before-told stories of the origins of Paganism and Wicca in the United States.

Wicca, also termed Pagan Witchcraft, is a Contemporary Pagan new religious movement. Chas S. Clifton is an American academic, author and historian who specialises in the fields of English studies and Pagan studies. Gardnarian Wicca was developed in England during the first half of the 20th century and was introduced to the public in 1954 by Gerald Gardner, a retired British civil servant. Clifton currently holds a teaching position in English at Colorado State University-Pueblo, prior to which he taught at Pueblo Community College.

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Reviews about Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca And Paganism in America (7):
SmEsH
This gives the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, all of which (in my estimate as a non-initiated follower of Wicca) are blending to produce a soon-hugely-popular religion. As long as you can remember what the term "feet of clay" means, this book will immensely help you to understand Wicca's roots as well as where it lay relative to society at the start of the 21st Century..
Eyalanev
excellent rendition of the modern pagan movement. a good companion for Margot Adler's Drawing down the moon and Huttons' Triumph of the Moon. both of these books are highly recommended. the former mainly for American Paganism and the latter for European.
Laitchai
Excellent basic history of the rise of Wicca and Neo Paganism in the US. It has been very useful in our discussion group.
Falya
"her hidden children the Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America" by Chas S. Clifton, is a sobering study into the dark and often misunderstood world of "Wicca", and ..."the Craft."

The book is actually a very well researched text and would make a superb referral book to any college course in Wicca and Paganism in America.
The reality of Wicca's genesis and those who helped mold it's contemporary theology only serves to tarnishes the mystique of the subject matter.

I personally, would have preferred a more flowing "story-book" form of literary expressiveness. This would have allowed the reader to maintain just a wee-bit more of that "magical mystery." However, that thought alone is "magical thinking" and would have been unrealistic.

This is a very good chronological study and academic interpretation of
Witchcraft, and Paganism. Like most religions that have undergone years of transformation, the reader can only wonder; "Was there ever a real honest to goodness witch?"

Clifton's study shows the reader there are many brands of self- proclaimed witchs, but... none with a broom!

In my opinion, this is a 4-star book based on the deep caldron of superb information the author gives to his reader. It should be a constant companion to those who have an honest interest in the truth of religions and those who profess them.

Joseph R. Calmia
Bladebringer
A history of American Wicca. Excellent book. Very well written. Clifton makes the "what happened before" accessable to even the casual reader. For those of us who wish to read actual history in addition to our mythical history this is a must have tome.
Cordaron
I read Mr. Clifton's blog, which is where I first heard of this book. It's a wonderful and amazing study of the origins of Wicca in America - while the history of Wicca in England is a necessary topic to cover in a book like this, Clifton thankfully doesn't go into much detail about it (plenty of books can be found covering that subject. The Triumph of the Moon: A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft is the essential book for that subject).

I only have one complaint - too short! I wish it was longer, much longer. Great book, but I wish the topics were covered more indepth. Still, it's a great history of paganism and "nature worship" in the states and definitely worth a read and a place on any pagan or comparative religion bookshelf.
Jazu
During the Middle Ages (and well into the Renaissance period) scholars, inquisitors, and other "learned men" established an official definition and depiction of witchcraft. This "empirical truth" of the past era is now an acknowledged falsehood in the eyes of most modern scholars who believe that the matter was actually one of hysteria and politics (no witches, no witches' sect).

Modern scholars are now doing today what was being done in the past centuries. In other words they are establishing a definition and depiction of Wicca, once again based on empirical truth. Here again we find an official depiction in which we are told what is true and what is not. Unfortunately the "objective view" of modern scholars is as tainted now as was the view of learned men in past centuries.

In Clifton's book, Her Hidden Children, the author uses words like "purported" instead of reported or claimed. The word purported is far from objective, as is the word "liar" which the author also uses when referring to certain figures in Wicca and Witchcraft today. The personal bias of this so-called "objective" scholar is no more apparent than in his dealing with the topic of hereditary witches. Clifton sees the lack or absence of documentation as absolute proof of the non-existence of hereditary witches (of whom he is highly critical of throughout the book). He goes on to comment that the lack of documentation is "convenient" for people that claim hereditary lineage. In truth the lack is probably anything but convenient for these individuals, for it brings only skepticism, criticism, and alienation to anyone who openly admits to a family tradition.

Many modern scholars point to the depiction of the former image of the witch as evil, and they say that modern witches cannot be descended from them because the modern beliefs and practices bear no resemblance. However, since the former depiction has no roots in any real historical sect, the argument holds no water. It's a failed attempt to have it both ways during a debate.

Clifton's book purports to be a warm, humorous, and sympathetic telling of the origins and evolution of Wicca by an insider. However in this regard it fails to deliver the hype that appears in the endorsements on the back of the book. In the telling of Wicca's story the author uses the accounts of popular figures and organizations as the definitive foundation from which Clifton creates his material for the book. In doing so he fails to take into account the 70 to 80 percent of solitary practitioners who comprise the true body of Wiccan religion. These are the people who actually wrote the history of Wicca and continue to do so without documentation or celebrity status. So again, the empirical truth of scholars is narrow and political, pertaining only to a handful of examples of practitioners who achieve the public eye and who thereby become the role models and definitives (despite being only a minority presence among Wiccans as a whole).

With `Her Hidden Children' Clifton joins the ranks of the new batch of learned men, a brotherhood of such figures as Ronald Hutton, who carry on the work of those during the period of the Inquisition who gave us the official definitions and depictions of witches and witchcraft. Their views are as foreign now to the truth as were those back then in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Ironically modern scholars like Clifton, while dismissing the idea of any lineage tradition, are actually carrying on one of their own from the time of the Inquisition. Through this they maintain themselves as the authorities who tell us what is truth and what is not, no matter what we experience and believe on our own.

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