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by Jonathan Rosen

  • ISBN: 0374272387
  • Category: Religious books
  • Author: Jonathan Rosen
  • Subcategory: Judaism
  • Other formats: doc lit mobi mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux; 1st edition (September 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 132 pages
  • FB2 size: 1527 kb
  • EPUB size: 1213 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 410
Download The Talmud and the Internet: A Journey Between Worlds fb2

But the connection between the Talmud and the Internet was not very well developed. Mr. Rosen's book has little to do with the internet and only a bit more to do with the talmud, but is an excellent discussion of his own philosophy. Published on February 22, 2007.

But the connection between the Talmud and the Internet was not very well developed. Some of the problem may well be, of course, that my expectations were off. Leaving those aside, it was worth reading. Published on January 3, 2005.

The Talmud and the messy Internet of 2001, when this book was written, are both conversations between many different .

This slim book contains deep wisdom. Very enlightening for those not familiar with the ins and outs of the Talmud beyond the occasional Yom Kippur service.

Jonathan Rosen blends religious history, memoir, and literary reflection as he compares the fortunate life of his American-born grandmother to the life of his European-born grandmother who was murdered by Nazis. The Talmud and the Internet explores the contradictions of Rosen's inheritance and toggles between personal paradoxes and those of the larger world. Along the way, he chronicles the remarkable parallels between a page of Talmud and the home page of a Web site

Rosen, Jonathan, 1963-.

Rosen, Jonathan, 1963-. New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by abowser on April 7, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

A Journey between Worlds. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Along the way, he chronicles the remarkable parallels between a page of Talmud and the home page of a Web site. In the loose, associative logic and the vastness of each, he discovers not merely the disruption of a broken world but a kind of disjointed harmony. He lives in New York City.

Rosen, Jonathan (1997). Eve's apple : a novel. New York: Random House The Talmud and the Internet : a journey between worlds, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000. Joy comes in the morning, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004. The birds : why the passenger pigeon became extinct". a b c d Harris, Ben (21 December 2007)

Blending memoir, religious history and literary reflection Rosen explores the remarkable parallels between a page of Talmud and the homepage of a web site, and reflects on the contrasting lives and deaths of his American and European grandmothers.

Blending memoir, religious history and literary reflection Rosen explores the remarkable parallels between a page of Talmud and the homepage of a web site, and reflects on the contrasting lives and deaths of his American and European grandmothers.

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THE TALMUD AND THE INTERNET: A Journey Between Worlds, by Jonathan Rosen.

Blending autobiographical musings, religious history, and literary reflection, the author of Eve's Apple explores the relationship between ancient religious tradition and modern technology as he reflects on the very different lives of his two grandmothers--one American, and one murdered by the Nazis--and examines the parallels between a page of the Talmud and the home page of a website. 50,000 first printing.
Reviews about The Talmud and the Internet: A Journey Between Worlds (7):
the monster
Mr. Rosen shows us in this well written short book the difficulties of what it means for him to be Jewish. Two grandmothers dominate his inner life. One, on the maternal side, born in America, thoroughly assimilated, who died at a ripe old age in the midst of her family. The other, whom he never knew, had lived in Vienna and had become a victim of the Nazis murderous fury. Rosen's father experienced Hitler's invasion of Austria as a thirteen year old boy and was fortunate to have been sent with one of the "Kindertransporte" to Scotland and eventually came to America. The father's family perished during the war as part of the Holocaust. Thus Rosen tries to come to terms with these conflicting fates which still haunt him.
His family epitomizes the Jewish dilemna of belonging, but not quite. America with its material benefits is felt as a blessing. At the same time it is not truly "home" because part of Rosen's soul is still in the Poland of his grandmother's ancestors, as experienced in the study of the Talmud. As the title of the book indicates Rosen tries to make a connection between the material and the spiritual aspects of his heritage and he has done so quite convincingly. He also gives the non-Jewish reader an inkling of why the Talmud is relevant for today's Judaism.
Rosen points out that it is the Jewish New Testament. But in Judaism it is not the "word" which became "flesh," but the "flesh" became "word." This happened when Jochanan ben Zakkai had himself smuggled out in a coffin from beleaguered Jerusalem. With Roman permission he then founded the Yeshiva at Yavneh and thus became the father of rabbinic Judaism as we know it today. The consequences of this inversion of terms are actually enormous and I leave it to the reader to ponder them.
Let me just point out that the Talmud is not a book but an encyclopedia which consists of many volumes. It contains widely differing opinions on Jewish law, legends, moral exhortations, and day to day advice on the most diverse subjects. It is as disjointed as the Internet and similar to the Internet you can find almost everything you want but it surely takes patience to locate the needle in the haystack.
Nevertheless this is, as far as I am concerned, not really the Talmud's major importance for the Gentile world. It is rather the fact that Law even if it is divinely ordained through Moses in the Pentateuch, can and should be disputed. Dissent is encouraged. Arguments are held over words and sentences which are given meanings which are totally different from what one would expect Moses had intended. This attitude that "everything is negotiable," which does not stop at the doors of the synagogue and the word of God, makes Judaism profoundly different from all the other great religions of the world. It is this "talmudic thinking" which has invaded America's culture. Whether or not this has been of benefit to society at large each one of us has to decide in his/her own mind. While the Talmud may provide solace for some it also perpetuates an "us versus them" attitude and as longs as this mental framework exists Rosen's newborn daughter will inherit a world which will continue to be torn by strife.
Der Bat
My wife encouraged me to read this book because of my interest in both the Talmud and the internet. Sadly, there is very little about either subject compared to the author's family reminiscences.
I know some people who feel completely comfortable hijacking a perfectly decent conversation about any subject at all with stories of their long dead Aunt Tillie. This book was like that.
I had hoped to learn something and to be fair, there was some meat in the book, but in order to get to it, I had to get past all the relatives. I found myself rolling my eyes and saying :"enough, already.'
Daizil
A short, pleasing essay on the different strands that inform our lives, which we weave into our consciousness. Rosen speaks often of personal things, but stays more on the philosophical level in his overall writing. The reader comes away knowing more about his analytical tendencies than his own history.

I agree with the author that the Internet is a powerful metaphor for the interconnectedness of life. The Talmud, in its turn, may indeed be the original "hyperlinked" document, and I smile in wonder at the thought of trying to bring the full complexity of life to a sheaf of written pages, as (I hear) the Talmud aspires to do. In these days, can we all create our own Talmuds from the Internet, interconnected references to explain our lives? But if they are all individual, then what culture remains in common? Rosen addresses these questions briefly and with grace.
ndup
This is a wonderful book that is much more than the sum of it's parts. It equates the endless possibilities of Talmud study with the various infinite links on the Internet. The book reads as a tribute to the survival of the Jewish people and how those heroes(or anti-heroes) such as Yochanan ben Zakkai and Josephus felt a need to spread the roots of Judaism to what has become the Diaspora. These were not perfect men the way Rosen describes them but they violated the rules to secure a belief. Jonathan Rosen also mentions his own search within his family as he attempts to unite the contradictions between both his grandmothers's life experiences. Since I also have somewhat of a similar backround, with my grandfather and my aunts having died in the Holocaust, I can identify with his search by way of the Internet. My father who was born in Poland also studied in Vienna but escaped the Nazis by way of France. The reference to Marcel Proust is a good one. Here is a half-Jew who was always writing about the beauty of contradiction in his observations about time and life. The endless Talmudic argumentations are also filled with the kind of contradictions that lead to a healthy survival.
Ferri - My name
I was disappointed by The Talmud and the Internet for two reasons. First, it was more a collection of essays on a common theme than an extended meditation, which is what I was expecting. As such, it was frequently redundant. Slight as it was, it could have been even more so. Second, it was very much more Talmud than Internet, which the author does in fact mention in his preface. But the connection between the Talmud and the Internet was not very well developed.
Some of the problem may well be, of course, that my expectations were off. Leaving those aside, it was worth reading. The prose is thoughtful and graceful, and the tone very personal. Rosen's description of the Talmud as a sort of literary replacement for the Temple at Jerusalem was new to me. I was also interested in his comparison of the multi-generational, non-linear aspect of the Talmud to the idiosyncratic character of the Internet (and, as mentioned above, would have liked to see this better developed).
Ungall
a gem of a book; will leave it as an inheritance; not to be missed.
Kirizius
a good collection of essays and very well written. The contents didn't completely reflect the title, but it was intriguing nevertheless.

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