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by Marcus Trower

  • ISBN: 0091910676
  • Category: Reference
  • Author: Marcus Trower
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Other formats: azw mobi lrf mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ebury Press (January 23, 2007)
  • Pages: 400 pages
  • FB2 size: 1952 kb
  • EPUB size: 1746 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 960
Download The Last Wrestlers: A Far Flung Journey In Search of a Manly Art fb2

The Last Wrestlers is an absolutely fascinating, heartfelt and original book that deserves a wide audience’ -Robert Twigger, author of Angry White Pyjamas.

The Last Wrestlers is an absolutely fascinating, heartfelt and original book that deserves a wide audience’ -Robert Twigger, author of Angry White Pyjamas. the perfect guide on a journey to discover the roots of a sport which, in the Western world, has long been forgotten. Trower has perfect pitch for the sentence that illuminates an entire culture. Describes the characters beautifully. -Sunday Times Travel Magazine

The Last Wrestlers book.

The Last Wrestlers book. This is a genuinely exciting and entertaining book, and if it doesn't win Trower a sports-writing gong of some sort, then I'll change my byline to Big Daddy.

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For Marcus Trower, however, the camp theatre of WWF was a dishonourable perversion of an honourable tradition - a tradition sadly on the wane in modern society. His travels took him to such far-flung reaches as India, Mongolia, Nigeria and Brazil, the incredible scenery matched by equally colourful characters. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Brand new: lowest price.

The manly art of wrestling. Published by Thriftbooks

book by Marcus Trower. The manly art of wrestling. Published by Thriftbooks. This book records his adventures tracking down traditional wrestling styles in India, Mongolia, Nigeria and Brazil, interspersed with his theories about the origins of the sport.

I suspect, then, that I am well qualified to relate to the frustration of Marcus Trower

MY SPORT IS table tennis. When I say my sport, I mean it not only in the sense that table tennis is the sport that I play (and love) but also in the sense that I feel somewhat proprietorial about it, wanting to protect it from those who dismiss it as a sub-species of athletic endeavour more akin to trainspotting.

Dan Jones: Dan Jones Wrestles with Two Books on Fighting - The Last Wrestlers: A Far Flung Journey in. .The last live wrestling match I saw was at the Cambridge Corn Exchange in 2002

The last live wrestling match I saw was at the Cambridge Corn Exchange in 2002. The highlight was a ‘Fatties Match’, in which three men with a combined weight of nearly 100 stone cavorted around the creaking ring. They were wearing leotards and tiny pairs of underpants, and performed numerous unlikely somersaults that did none of them much physical damage, but made a thunderous noise.

For Marcus Trower, however, the camp theatre of WWF was a dishonourable perversion of an honourable tradition - a tradition sadly on the wane in modern society

For Marcus Trower, however, the camp theatre of WWF was a dishonourable perversion of an honourable tradition - a tradition sadly on the wane in modern society. Wrestling acted as an outlet, both physical and mental, for Marcus; a means of expression 'purer' than any of the martial arts he had tried before. Then tragedy struck - chronic health problems prevented him from doing what he loved most. Unwilling to let go, he determined to look into the roots of wrestling, to try and uncover some deeper, perhaps spiritual, dimension. His travels took him to such far-flung reaches as India,.

Babu Hari Narayan Singh was a renowned wrestler who killed a man-eater .

Babu Hari Narayan Singh was a renowned wrestler who killed a man-eater (lion) fighting without any weapon. Babu Siddheshwar Prasad Singh was a renowned socialist leader of his time. Vijay Shankar Singh represented Mohammedabad assembly constituency since 1952, till 1985 as Member of Legislative Assembly(MLA), continuously, with a gap of one term in between. The History of the Gāhaḍavāla Dynasty, Roma Niyogi, Oriental Book Agency, 1959. Kinwar Vanshawali, Kashi Nagari Pracharini Sabha, Varanasi.

This story was told to Marcus Trower on the Indian leg of what amounted to.Trower establishes that such an aggressive sport is founded on a collision between testosterone and the human spirit.

This story was told to Marcus Trower on the Indian leg of what amounted to a spiritual quest. Like most spiritual quests, there was some pain involved. Finding it a dying art in Britain, and wondering whether sport can have any spiritual value, he undertakes a world tour of wrestling hotbeds: India, Mongolia, Nigeria and Brazil. In India, he finds a wrestling caste, the Yadav, and discovers that Indian wrestling's spiritual dimension lies in the preparation, not the competition.

Marcus Trower hated WWF. He hated Hulk Hogan, Big Daddy and all the other spandex-clad musclemen who over the years had made a mockery of his beloved sport. For him, wrestling — real wrestling — was a means of expression, both physical and mental. It was also, in Britain at least, a dying art. Then tragedy struck — chronic health problems prevented him doing what he loved most. Unwilling to let go, he travelled to such far-flung reaches as India, Mongolia, Nigeria and Brazil in an attempt to uncover some deeper, perhaps spiritual, dimension to wrestling. Amidst incredible scenery and a cast of colourful characters, Marcus discovered the true origins of wrestling appeared to have little to do with spirituality and everything to do with seduction… The Last Wrestlers is the story of one man’s rebellion against the office-bound constraints of the modern world. Vivid, comic and often moving, it reveals a testosterone-fuelled world you never knew existed.
Reviews about The Last Wrestlers: A Far Flung Journey In Search of a Manly Art (7):
Tygrarad
Pros:
1-A serious book about real wrestling.
2-Examines different styles in several different cultures and what they mean to that society. Tries to tie into a Big Picture about what wrestling means as a whole to culture and manhood.
3-This guy gets around. Gives you a taste of what it's like in exotic places like India, Mongolia and Nigeria.
4-Well written. He has a talent for telling a story.

Con:
I understand the desire to find a spiritual level to wrestling. Does, or can, our participation mean something broader to our humanity than just sport? While I think the answer is, "It depends on the person and how they apply the lessons", he seems to seeking an almost Pagan-like worship of the act itself. So, while I think you can certainly make positive spiritual connections, he takes it way too far in my mind. Even lamenting that Jesus is an incomplete picture of manhood because he doesn't exhibit the same attributes and drive he sees in grapplers. To me, that ultimately says he's seeking the wrong spiritual development from wrestling. One of strength for dominance instead of strength for character.

But, as I said. Still a great read.
Fearlessdweller
I quite enjoyed The Last Wrestlers. The auther seems to genuinly care about searching for the meaning of wrestling; so much so that he travels to war ridden Africa to gain insight.

While entertaing the author also provides deep insight to an art that means soo much more to the world than just what we in the USA view as a sport.

While I feel the Mr. Trower at times filled the book with too much detail over small things, he did very good job keeping my attention throughout the entire story.
energy breath
Marcus Trower made an amazing job writing this one.
MMA has just became bigger after the book came out, so I think that readers interested in fighting, specially grappling/wrestling/submission will enjoy the book, as well as social scientists looking for an explanation on the MMA phenmenom: it in our roots.
Bladebringer
Well written! I'd recommend this to any student or fan grappling/wrestling.
Framokay
The Last Wrestlers" is one man's highly personal account of sporting obsession. Marcus Trower, rather like the characters in "Fight Club", despised his office job and lives for submssion wrestling. When a bout of ill health forces him to give up this physical outlet he embarks on a world tour to investigate the place of wrestling in other cultures where it is more highly valued than in Britain, where it's very much a minority pursuit.

Trower's interest and expertise in wrestling acts as a kind of visa enabling him to connect with people from a variety of different countries. In India, Mongolia, Brazil, Nigeria and Portsmouth pier, the author is able to gain access to people whose experience of life is very different from his own. I particularly enjoyed his skirmishes with interpreters, from an extrovert Nigerian academic to a former beauty queen who is possibly the worst person to choose to gain access to the celebrities which wrestlers are in Mongolian society.

I love Trower's turn of phrase. Modern gyms are, "a cross between an office, a show kitchen and a nightclub where everyone dances alone", in contrast to the feeling of fraternity he encounters in wrestling clubs. There is also a kind of haplessness as he faces a bizarre range of replies to a Time Out ad for training partners, is forced to bathe in the Ganges out of an English sense of politeness and has to decide how many bottles of vodka to give as bribes to his interviewees.

At times the book is so detailed it may fail to hold the interest of non-wrestlers. But I found it immensely enjoyable and unexpectedly touching. Trower is a good writer and his mission is so obviously heartfelt that I was genuinely sad when it came to an end.
Blackseeker
The author, English journalist Marcus Trower, like Tyler Durden in Fight Club, became sick of being told to "play safe" in his life and fell in love with weight lifting, judo and submission wrestling (in that order). He quickly became frustrated with the attitude of his own culture, that of modern London, towards wrestling, and by extension towards certain precepts of masculinity, physical risk-taking and so-on.

After contracting a mysterious illness that prevented him from training and competing, he set out to discover what wrestling means in other cultures. This book records his adventures tracking down traditional wrestling styles in India, Mongolia, Nigeria and Brazil, interspersed with his theories about the origins of the sport.

I don't agree with all of his conclusions, but "the Last Wrestlers" is well-written, entertaining and educational. It's also an unusual and heartfelt combination of athletic travelogue and "masculinist manifesto", worth reading particularly by those who spend about equal time in the library and at the gym.
Dominator
This book helped inspire myself to travel around the world training.
Although not in wrestling but various martial arts around the globe, something I am grateful for
It is a book I would certainly reccomend .
I am going to buy another copy as I gave my first one away to a friend .

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