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by Joe Queenan

  • ISBN: 0330393235
  • Category: Reference
  • Author: Joe Queenan
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Other formats: lrf rtf txt lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Picador (November 10, 2000)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • FB2 size: 1782 kb
  • EPUB size: 1190 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 753
Download My Goodness: a Cynic's Short-Lived Search for Sainthood fb2

Joe Queenan was born November 3, 1950.

Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. A spotty, curmudgeonly, generally funny satire of the virtues of political correctness. Joe Queenan was born November 3, 1950. He lives in Tarrytown, New York.

Joe Queenan is a prolific free-lance satirist and critic. He is the author of nine books, including Red Lobster, White Trash and the Blue Lagoon and If You’re Talking to Me, Your Career Must Be in Trouble. His best-selling memoir Closing Time was a 2009 New York Times Notable Book. Malcontents: The Best Bitter, Cynical, and Satirical Writing in the World.

Joe Queenan knows what a maleficent scuzz he is. In My Goodness, he admits he wrote a Barbra Streisand profile called Sacred Cow in his scurrilous book If. . In My Goodness, he admits he wrote a Barbra Streisand profile called Sacred Cow in his scurrilous book If You're.

I hadn’t heard of Joe Queenan before, but he describes himself as ‘an acerbic, mean-spirited observer of the human condition’ and gives many examples from his earlier books and newspaper articles to illustrate this

I hadn’t heard of Joe Queenan before, but he describes himself as ‘an acerbic, mean-spirited observer of the human condition’ and gives many examples from his earlier books and newspaper articles to illustrate this

Enter Joe Queenan into this world of ostentatious goodness

Enter Joe Queenan into this world of ostentatious goodness. He is far from the first writer to identify the pursuit of human virtue as prime satirical fodder, but he's probably the first to do so by working within the system. In ''My Goodness,'' he interrupts a lucrative career spent gleefully skewering Hollywood airheads and other hapless patsies for skewering's sake, hooks a moral U-turn and attempts to become a good person himself.

the "in your face" martyrs laughing at pagans who flayed their mere flesh, Queenan now pretends he'd like to join contemporary

the "in your face" martyrs laughing at pagans who flayed their mere flesh, Queenan now pretends he'd like to join contemporary. saints and Cadillac liberals like Paul Newman, Jimmy Carter, Tom of Maine, Susan Sarandon, and Robin Williams. and Sting with Jesus.

Common Hour Get a Job. Any Job (Highlights).

Like Queenan's Red Lobster, White Trash, And The Blue Lagoon, for which he spent a year plumbing the lower depths of.But My Goodness frequently hits its satirical targets, if only because the author takes so many shots.

Like Queenan's Red Lobster, White Trash, And The Blue Lagoon, for which he spent a year plumbing the lower depths of American pop culture, the book is a headlong immersion into something he loathes, namely, the self-righteous practice of trumpeting your own philanthropy. In that vein, he follows the precedent set by Jimmy Carter, Susan Sarandon, Ben & Jerry, and Sting in a daily struggle to curb his natural viciousness and do something positive-within reason and budget-for humanity.


Reviews about My Goodness: a Cynic's Short-Lived Search for Sainthood (7):
Shalinrad
This was the first thing I have read by Mr. Queenan (and somehow I sensed that most readers of this book were already quite familiar with his work). I thought he was an excellent writer and there were a number of amusing moments in the book. The one thing that gnawed at me for the entire book however was my inability to decide whether the author's "conversion-to-goodness" experience was, on one hand, (1) simply a one-time lark--i..e gist for new comedy material that he would "try" for as long as it took to write the book, and that he never really believed in for a second, or (2) meant as a permanent life-altering experience, at least when he started out on this new approach to life. There seemed to be some evidence in the book supporting both answers, although on balance, it seemed as if the first alternative comes much closer to the truth, even though he never comes right out and admits that. He just seemed to be tongue-in-cheek way too often, not to mention the dozens of references to Ben and Jerry's, Susan Sarandon, Alec Baldwin, etc., and his "non-apology apologies" to various people. Anyway, I would recommend the book.
GAMER
I was taken a bit aback when I read the jacket of Joe Queenan's latest book. Had Joe taken flight of his senses, buried that hatchet he wields so well, and become a (gasp!) kind and decent person? Would the name Queenan soon join those of Baldwin, Sarandon and Browne atop the pantheon of Famous People Who Do Good Things?
The book leads us, hilariously of course, through Joe's quest to become a Very Good Person. Much of Queenan's work consists of brutal hatchet jobs on the inexplicably rich, the undeservedly famous, and the formidably underbrained, a harsh task that he is extremely well-qualifed for (he was born and raised in Philadelphia). So one could look on this book as a tale of a man trying to atone for his misdeeds, a pilgrim seeking the path of enlightenment.
As you might expect, the change doesn't occur overnight. Queenan spends six months trying to turn over a new leaf, and ends up eating lots of organic matter not too far removed from leaves, including Edensoy, St.John's Wort tortilla chips, and wheatgrass. He lobbies for the rights of labratory rats and personally accounts for a 5% spike in sales at the Body Shop. As he does in so many of his books, Queenan doesn't just tell us what we should do--he actually blazes the trail for us to follow.
I won't go into great detail about Queenan's trials and tribulations, but I will say that one chapter of the book focuses on his noble and lengthy quest to find a rare Elvis Costello CD for a fan who wrote to Queenan and asked if he might have a copy of it. I am a huge EC fan and to my mind this clinched the book as one of the most inspirational I have ever read. The sacrifice, the effort, all to spread the music of Elvis across the land...I was moved.
I'll leave it to you to read the book to learn how Joe arrives at his eventual state of grace, one that allows him to once again pick up his cudgel and start smashing again at overripe egos. All I can say is that as usual I ended up hyperventilating because I laughed too hard too many times. Queenan proves that sometimes you not only have to be cruel to be kind, you have to be cruel to be good. And few are as cruel, or as good, as Joe Queenan.
Fenius
This very funny little book spoke to me on multiple levels -- not all of which were intended by the author -- with the result that, notwithstanding my passing enjoyment of the current title, I am not likely to look for his work elsewhere. The premise here is that Queenan decides to turn over a new leaf. He had apparently made a name for himself, and a great deal of money, as a literary hatchet man -- one who has cut a wide swath through popular culture. Either sincerely or as a pretense (he did, after all, obtain an advance for this book), he spent 6 months trying to mend his ways. Everything from his diet (nothing with eyes, shade-grown organic coffee), to his musical selections (only artists who supported charitable causes) and videos (ditto), to his apparel (tees with uplifting slogans) and bumper stickers (ditto) underwent a sea change. He started practing Random Acts of Kindness (RAKs) and Senseless Acts of Beauty (SABs). He wrote letters of apology to offended readers (he had saved the critical missives over a decade) and finally set up a Web site to apologize to the rich and famous he had savaged. He even tried to clean up his investment portfolio. And he is undeniably funny. While he engages in his RAKs and SABs and acts of contrition, however, he manages back-handed slaps at all of the good causes he embraces and worthy individuals he extolls. On one level this works for me as good humored poking at many of the causes and behaviors I embrace: after all, every saint has feet of clay (or genes of carbon, for the more literal reader) and if you can't see the flaws in your beliefs you are simply pie-eyed. On another level it lends the book a sense of untruth. One gets the sense that the whole undertaking was simply another avenue for a hatchet man done up in angel drag. The fact that I am approximately as widely-read as any person I know and have managed to miss Queenan's previous work says worlds about the vastness of modern literature. While I quite enjoyed his letter of apology to Jackie Collins for slamming her writing in a review (which amounted to almost no apology at all), I neither read Collins nor would be likely to read a review of Collins. The same is true of many of his other favorite targets: John Tesh, Garth Brooks, Geraldo Rivera, etc. and etc. Sorry, not interested. Of the magazines which evidently regularly hire this writer: GQ, Movieline, TV Guide, Spy, Barrons, Playboy, Forbes, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Chief Executive, Commonweal, Venture, Philadelphia and Amtrak Express, I read approximately none, with the very, very, occasional exception of the Post front page news online. Many of his favorite targets are TV personalities, and he himself is a frequent TV guest, but I haven't watched much TV in the past few decades. I don't offer this as snobbery (to each his own) -- we just don't seem to have overlapping cultural interests, and this despite our evidently confluent political views. There is doubtless some level of writer-envy working here. Queenan is paid handsomely to knock down the famous, or to famously knock down the obscure, and I can't pretend that it wouldn't be nice to be paid the $800 he gets for a book review or the $3000 he gets for longer pieces. (Even now, a decade later.) But neither Queenan's targets nor his brand of marksmanship much interest me, making this book great but easily forgetable fun.

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