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by Stephen King

  • ISBN: 142813994X
  • Category: Reference
  • Author: Stephen King
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
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  • FB2 size: 1620 kb
  • EPUB size: 1316 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 963
Download On Writing, A Memoir of the Craft (AUDIOBOOK) (CD) fb2

Stephen King’s memoir, On Writing, is an interesting and helpful book for wannabe and experienced authors both, because he explores both writing and the writing life. Film buffs might also read this book to garner the backstory on his films, many of which are now cult classics

Stephen King’s memoir, On Writing, is an interesting and helpful book for wannabe and experienced authors both, because he explores both writing and the writing life. Film buffs might also read this book to garner the backstory on his films, many of which are now cult classics. Personally, I read this book mostly because I like to read and love to write-perhaps, you do too.

Listen to and download Writing: A Memoir of the Craf Audiobook written by Stephen King for free without annoying advertising

Listen to and download Writing: A Memoir of the Craf Audiobook written by Stephen King for free without annoying advertising. Though Stephen King met a horrible accident in his life, he also describes in his book how the urge to write made him recover quickly and he started as a writer to capture the attention of most of the suspense and horror lovers. He wrote many novels later including The Tommyknockers, It, Salem’s Lot and much more. All the details narrated by Stephen King makes it, even more, attention-grabbing for the readers and no one would be interested in leaving the story unfinished at any spot. Download This Book To Your Device.

On Writing: A Memoir Of The Craft. Unabridged Audiobook. Long live the King hailed Entertainment Weekly upon publication of Stephen King’s On Writing. Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer’s craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have.

By Audiobooks in Stephen King. Drink and be filled up. Stephen King – On Writing Audiobook. 2000 Stephen King – On Writing Audiobook read by Stephen King. The memoir section isn’t only a memoir, engrossing throughout the stories are, it is an illustration of how one man found himself that the writer he is today. There is a gem at the memoir segment, as well: King’s destruction of this alcoholic-writer stereotype. There are also codas to the text: a story pre- and post-revision to provide the reader an idea of how a revision must look along with a reading list of novels King enjoyed or believes demonstrate the craft particularly well.

Stephen King’s memoir, On Writing, is an interesting and helpful book for wannabe and experienced authors both, because he explores both writing and the writing life.

On Writing Formats: Cassette, CD Released (US):October, 2000 . More Covers & Posters: There are no additional images for this Audiobook.

On Writing Formats: Cassette, CD Released (US):October, 2000 Publisher:Simon & Schuster Audio Read By:Stephen King In Print:Yes. Synopsis: On Writing is both a textbook for writers and a memoir of Stephen's life and will, thus, appeal even to those who are not aspiring writers. If you've always wondered what led Steve to become a writer and how he came to be the success he is today, this will answer those questions. You appear to be using Internet Explorer 7 or earlier.

ON WRITING: A MEMOIR OF THE CRAFT is a brilliant book on writing from the number one bestselling writer. Described in the Guardian as 'the most remarkable storyteller in modern American literature', Stephen King writes books that draw you in and are impossible to put down. Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer's craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have. co/2eqOT1z Audiobooks. NaNoWriMo Writing Novels Tommyknockers Carrie. Seems a little quiet over here.

Responsible for more nightmares than the bogeyman, Stephen King has earned his reputation as the master of horror with more than 30 international best-sellers. On Writing shines with his enthusiasm for his craft and provides insightful lessons for writers. First serialized in the New Yorker, this engaging memoir has met with eager acclaim. King's advice is friendly and to the point: acquire and hone the tools necessary for good writing, let your characters reveal the story, and dare to get started. With warmth and wit he tells the story of his colorful childhood, his collection of rejection slips in adolescence, and the struggling years that led to his first major publishing success. Finally, he talks about the accident that nearly killed him and the writing that helped him get his life back. Fans, serious writers, and listeners who enjoy the sound of a good book will find On Writing both inspiring and entertaining. Narrating the book himself, Stephen King engages listeners with his friendly, conversational style and exercises his world-famous flair for holding them spellbound until the very last word.
Reviews about On Writing, A Memoir of the Craft (AUDIOBOOK) (CD) (7):
Uriel
I enjoyed this book thoroughly, and took my time reading it. I could "hear" Mr. King's "voice" in my head as I read this on my iPad Kindle app. I felt like I was reading something from a friend---as if he had written a personal letter to me--- to give me an understanding of what he went through to become the person he is today. I think that his directives about the "how-to's" and "don't do's" were very practical. I breathed a sigh of relief when I got the feeling that writing classes and clubs are kind of a waste of time. Just write, is what I think he was telling me, I mean, his audience. I will probably read it again. What I got from his personal, real-life-lessons is this: Read a lot. Read good stuff. Write all the time. Find a place and write. Don't share your stuff unless you share it with someone you can trust. Go with your gut. Write all the time (I said that already because he said it or inferred it frequently). Don't use the same adjective over and over. Stick to the point. Don't over-do it on the descriptions. Let your audience see the movie you see in your head, because if you write it well, they will. I am glad this wasn't a "point by point HOW TO WRITE a story or a book" book, because really, writing isn't something you can do easily from a bulleted list. Writing is something you do from your heart, and you keep doing it until it's right and good. And then when that person you trust reads your stuff and offers some criticism, you can take it for what it's worth and use it or not.
Yozshujinn
Though far from the definitive writer's guideline, this book shines a unique perspective on the craft. Stephen King lays down the law and then teaches it. He shares his techniques, his pet peeves, and his own personal horrific experiences - both as child and adult - and he does it all within the cerebral classroom of the printed page. He wraps a juicy filling of personal tragedy, growth and experience within a tight covering of his famous story telling style.
As a human, I was touched by his childhood anecdotes and often laughed with him about his insecurities. I am still in awe at what he has recently had to overcome physically. I mean, damn.
As a writer, I am grateful for a brief glimpse into his vocational world. I gained confidence from learning about things I have been doing right and have changed many bad habits (may the adverb rest in peace). I've read several tomes on the subject and believe his reigns as the most complete.
I've been a fan of King's since the seventh grade when I was given The Dead Zone and Cujo as an Easter present. A year later I had read every book he'd published (with the exception of the dreaded Limited Editions of which I could opine negatively for hours - suffice it to say that writing should be for everyone to read, not just the rich). I've read or listened to all his books since. I can honestly say, that this is my favorite.
Sometimes the coldest hands to wrap around your neck are the true ones.
The only bad thing I can say about this book is that it's too short, something one rarely has the opportunity to state regarding the beloved author.
A huge thank you to Mr. King for a brief indulgence into the life of a genius.
Ber
My primary writing project during the past year has been to write a memoir. Being new to the genre, I started by publishing my father’s memoir, enrolled in an online writing course, read numerous writing books, and reviewed a few good memoirs. Stephen King’s book, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft, touches on each of these activities.

The breadth of this memoir comes as a surprise—what is a memoir of a craft anyway? King divides his memoir into several parts, including:

• C.V. (17-101).
• What Writing Is (103-137).
• On Writing (141-249).
• On Living: A Postscript (253-270).
• And Furthermore, Part I: Door Shut, Door Open (271-284).
• And Furthermore, Part II: A Booklike (285-288).
• Further to Furthermore, Part III (289-291).

His chapters are preceded by three forewords and, in spite of its length, this memoir reads quickly—but not too quickly. Still, the breadth of this work comes from the way that King weaves his life and his craft together—a visitor to the King house might be advised to forbear exploring the closets! What the heck; let’s explore.

King is an author and a household name. He has written numerous (35+) books, many of which have also appeared in film. As an example, his breakout work, Carrie, sold first as a paperback novel (1973) and was released three years later as a horror film.

Interestingly, Tabitha, King’s wife, rescued an early manuscript of Carrie from the trash, as King recalls:

“I had four problems with what I’d written. First, … the story didn’t move me emotionally. Second, ... I didn’t much like the lead character. Carrie White seemed thick and passive, a ready-made victim. … Third, … [I] was not feeling at home with either the surroundings or my all-girl cast of supporting characters. … Fourth, … the story wouldn’t pay unless it was pretty long. … I couldn’t see wasting two weeks, maybe even a month, creating a novella I didn’t like and wouldn’t be able to sell. So I threw it away.” (76-77)

But, confronted with his Ideal Reader (Tabitha) telling him that this manuscript had promise, King went back and gave Carrie his best shot.

This notion of an Ideal Reader is interesting. King writes for his wife, Tabitha, who happens also to be an author, which seems most fortunate because she can articulate her opinions to King in actionable language. King explains:

“Call that one person you write for Ideal Reader. He or she is going to be in your writing room all the time: in the flesh once you open the door and let the world back in to shine on the bubble of your dream, in spirit during the sometimes troubling and often exhilarating days of the first draft, when the door is closed.” (219)

King sees the Ideal Reader as particularly helpful in judging story pace—“the speed at which your narrative unfolds”—and the details to include in your backstory—“all the stuff that happened before your tale began but which has an impact on the front story” (220-223).

Part of the back story in King’s memoir evolves into front story in his postscript where he describes in detail his experience of being run over by a Dodge van in June of 1999, while walking down a country road in rural Maine (253-255). This story of his near-death experience might have been just an interesting aside, except for the fact that King had motivational problems in finishing this memoir back in that summer (265). I suspect that his life story suddenly became a slightly higher priority, having been thrown 14 feet in the air (259) and improbably lived through the experience.

Before I wrap up this review, let me make one more observation. King has an interesting view of plot. He describes plot as too big a hammer (a jackhammer) for normal use by fiction author and he prefers to motivate his characters through stressful situations (164). If you believe that we act out of our identities, then no two characters will respond the same way to a given tricky situation. How a story evolves out of a situation is therefore interesting and potentially surprising because people discover the character in themselves as they are challenged by life’s situations—we are ultimately strangers to ourselves; that is, until we are not. The thrill in the thriller is therefore hard to duplicate with a plot-line where the author already knows where the story will go and how it will get there—it is better to scrape the plot and discover the character the same way that a reader might. Therefore, King looks for strong situations and explores interesting what-if scenarios to challenge his characters and writes intuitively about how they respond (169).

Stephen King’s memoir, On Writing, is an interesting and helpful book for wannabe and experienced authors both, because he explores both writing and the writing life. Film buffs might also read this book to garner the backstory on his films, many of which are now cult classics. Personally, I read this book mostly because I like to read and love to write—perhaps, you do too.

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