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by Broughton Coburn

  • ISBN: 0385474180
  • Category: Reference
  • Author: Broughton Coburn
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Other formats: doc mobi rtf txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor (March 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • FB2 size: 1297 kb
  • EPUB size: 1369 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 835
Download Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart fb2

In addition, he has directed projects for the World Bank, World Wildlife Fund, and American Himalayan Foundation.

Aama in America book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Vishnu Maya, called Aama (Mother) by everyone in her tiny Nepalese.

Aama in America is on one level an offbeat American travelogue. In addition, he has directed projects for the World Bank, World Wildlife Fund, and American Himalayan Foundation.

Coburn, Broughton, 1951-. Gurung, Vishnu Maya, Nepalese. New York : Anchor Books/Doubleday. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger1 on September 26, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

item 4 Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart by Coburn, Broughton Book The Cheap -Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart by Coburn, Broughton Book The Cheap. item 5 Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart - Paperback NEW Coburn, Brought 1996- -Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart - Paperback NEW Coburn, Brought 1996-. item 6 Aama In America, Paperback, by Broughton Coburn -Aama In America, Paperback, by Broughton Coburn.

Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart. Aama in America is on one level an offbeat American travelogue

Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart. Aama in America is on one level an offbeat American travelogue. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Random House Publishing GroupReleased: Mar 9, 2011ISBN: 9780307787835Format: book. Aama in America - Broughton Coburn.

American Peace Corps worker Broughton Coburn records his cross-country tour of America during which he was . I found this book to be absolutely delightful! Seeing America through Aama's eyes was rather refreshing - how right she was about so many things

American Peace Corps worker Broughton Coburn records his cross-country tour of America during which he was accompanied by Himalayan wisewoman. I found this book to be absolutely delightful! Seeing America through Aama's eyes was rather refreshing - how right she was about so many things. We Americans are not as reverent to our Creator as we should be, nor do we give Him thanks for all He has given us. And how refreshing to see a human being enjoy things with utter and thankful delight, without reserve, cynicism or skepticism! Besides, the book was just plain funny.

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Find nearly any book by Broughton Coburn. The Call of Everest: The History, Science, and Future of the World's Tallest Peak. by Conrad Anker, Bernadette Mcdonald, David Breashears, Broughton Coburn. ISBN 9781426210167 (978-1-4262-1016-7) Hardcover, National Geographic, 2013.

Vishnu Maya, called Aama (Mother) by everyone in her tiny Nepalese village, was living high in the Himalayas when she befriended American Peace Corps worker Broughton Coburn in 1974. In 1988, Aama came to visit him—on a trip prescribed by village priests as a way for the eighty-four-year-old, four-foot-eight woman to earn merit by making a difficult journey late in life. Aama in Americais a vivid chronicle of what became a twenty-five-state, coast-to-coast adventure. Guided by the perpetual curiosity and deeply spiritual orientation of their ingenious, unpredictable travel companion, Coburn and his fiancée gradually began to view their country from an entirely new perspective. "Beneath the uniform, commercial, man-made epidermis of our country," Coburn writes, "Aama found a culture and landscape that was alive and sacred, and she steered us toward it."Aama in America is on one level an offbeat American travelogue. But on another it is a profound exploration of beliefs, values, and lost spirituality, a rediscovery of the spiritual that lies beneath the surface of America, and a singular account of the meeting of two widely divergent cultures.
Reviews about Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart (7):
Whilingudw
I picked up this book as someone who's been to India and met some wonderful people, some of who reminded me just a little bit of Aama. Anyone can travel the world, but I think regional people are really the most unique.

The author bonded with Aama and considered her to be a mother figure. He decided to bring her on a tour of America. A pretty crazy idea, but in a way I thought it was also an amazing and generous offer. Then again, I wonder if he had the idea of writing a book about it in the back of his mind.

The book is full of anecdotes about Aama's adjusting to life in America. Almost like that's the main theme of the book. After living for 8 decades in Nepal, she's pretty confused with things. I could identify with this because of having Indian relatives and seeing the clash of cultures there; they didn't know some things about America, and I also was in for some surprises when I went to India. There certainly are misunderstandings which can be funny. However, I started to feel that these things are more amusing when shared among friends. So much of the book is made up of these anecdotes, it almost seems like it's making fun, a kind of "look at all the funny things this cute old lady from Nepal thinks!", or at least filling up the book with anecdotes to make it more entertaining.

Many passersby thought that she was Native American. She met some Native Americans and it was interesting that she identified with them, thinking of them as a tribe that split off from her people. She did spend some time criticizing American culture. It's understandable from her viewpoint, but I got tired of the East=Good, West=Bad apologetics. I have never been a huge defender of the greatness of Western civilization, but I don't see it in black-and-white. I mean really--in a few places she criticized us for things like not giving an animal sacrifice! She also had very little knowledge of things like astronomy. She was mainly upset that America was lacking in religion--the same thing Christian fundamentalists think is wrong with the country. Her opinion was that we should pray more, leave more offerings, and other such rituals. We should certainly take time to see the beauty in life, and be grateful for what we have, but I don't think religion is necessary for that or anything else. Basically, she was very superstitious. If she'd had some advice about the environment I'd be more trusting in what she said, but she even said that people should all have children (and add to the population). The author was basically silent about what he thought of this, making me think that he went right along with it. I don't think it would have been disrespectful just to have some dialogue. Or did the author really agree with everything she said?

Aama was vividly portrayed, but I couldn't figure out what the author and his girlfriend were about (and what exactly their problem was with each other). They came off as self-absorbed new age types who needed absolute soul-mate perfection in a relationship. They seemed to go along with every religious ceremony and belief without any questioning nor much evidence. They both went to psychics and gurus, taking their vague words (such as "it could go either way"!) at face value and basing their lives on them. I do think it is possible to love another culture and respect a religion without going along with everything in it.
Cashoutmaster
It's the kind of book you think about weeks after having read it. It is inspiring and makes you stop to realize that there is so much more to life than the hustle of trying to keep afloat. It is funny and at times sad. I truely enjoyed it!
Dagdarad
I found this book to be absolutely delightful! Seeing America through Aama's eyes was rather refreshing - how right she was about so many things. We Americans are not as reverent to our Creator as we should be, nor do we give Him thanks for all He has given us. And how refreshing to see a human being enjoy things with utter and thankful delight, without reserve, cynicism or skepticism! Besides, the book was just plain funny. Aama's thoughts and interpretations of the sights and events she experiences in America are hilarious and heart warming. I found myself wanting to hug her tight and talk to her so I could see life the way she does and learn from her. Unlike some of the other reviewers, I don't think the author belittles Aama at all. He is quite honest about the times when he knows he didn't appreciate her like he should of - he admits he was wrong at times. In the end, he realizes he has loved her with his whole heart and he is grateful for having known her.
I will admit, however, that at times, I was a little concerned about exactly where his head was when it came to his relationship with Didi. I trust that they are still together and enjoying living their lives together.
A good, fun, light-hearted read that makes you quietly think about the more important things of life!!!
Zyangup
I found this book on accident and bought it on a whim. It was a truly pleasant surprise. As we continue to have challenges in our lives, stories like this allow you to experience a new perspective on our lives and the things we take for granted. If Americans could have even the smallest amount of Aama's devout approach to life and her respect for the things around her we would not see the things in our culture that shock us today. This is truly a story worth reading to learn from the other side of the world.
Jay
This book is a must read for anyone who feels there must be another way of looking at life besides malls and television. The author grapples with his own value system as his Aama experiences and comments on parts of life in America that he had taken for granted. Aama is uncensored and without pretensions as she relates her perceptions of places and customs across 25 states. I dare you not to love this book!
Mr_NiCkNaMe
I was so amazed about how many things we are so used to and don't even think about it anymore. It is a very eye opening book but also very funny and never boring because it is a real story. I will always read it again.
Kitaxe
This book finds a personal meaning for each person who will read it. Mr. Coburn takes his "adopted Mother"/friend, Aama, an elderly Nepalese woman, to his home--America. Aama has been confined to her village all of her life, but she realizes that this journey will be the last. This is scary for her, but she also realizes it is important that she have this experience. As I read this book, I became aware of how my view of America was numbed by ethnocentric attitudes. What I had taken for granted, felt assured of, was realigned by Aama and her fresh observations. Thank you, Mr. Coburn, for the introduction. Since this reading, I have tried to slow down, listen, and respect my surroundings. Too gushy? Too real, is more like it. America is beautiful, yet embarassing, as you travel with Aama through the natural beauty of our land and waters, to the modernity and wastes of our culture. This is not a book by a major novelist or writer, but who cares? I'm glad he shared what became a major life passage for him. Namaste.

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