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by Guy Kawasaki

  • ISBN: 0988523108
  • Category: Reference
  • Author: Guy Kawasaki
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Other formats: mbr docx lit mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Nononina Press; 1 edition (December 10, 2012)
  • Pages: 410 pages
  • FB2 size: 1866 kb
  • EPUB size: 1598 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 208
Download APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book fb2

APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur–How to Publish a Book.

APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur–How to Publish a Book. Because of this experience, Guy self-published his next book, What the Plus! and learned first-hand that self-publishing is a complex, confusing, and idiosyncratic process. As Steve Jobs said, There must be a better way. With Shawn Welch, a tech wizard, Guy wrote APE to help people take control of their writing careers by publishing their books.

Because of this experience, Guy self-published his next book, What the Plus! and learned first-hand that self-publishing is a complex, confusing, and idiosyncratic process

APE’s thesis is powerful yet simple: filling the roles of Author, Publisher and Entrepreneur yields results that rival traditional publishing. If you’d like to learn how to publish a book, APE provides what you need to know.

APE’s thesis is powerful yet simple: filling the roles of Author, Publisher and Entrepreneur yields results that rival traditional publishing. We call this artisanal publishing –that is, when writers who love their craft control the publishing process and produce high-quality books. We call this "artisanal publishing"-that is, when writers who love their craft control the publishing process and produce high-quality books. APE is 300 pages of tactical and practical inspiration.

Kawasaki produces a nice book. But it's written from where he's sitting. As an example let us consider doing interior layout for a book. APE makes it pretty clear InDesign is generally the best choice for laying out a print book. This is a man who has published numerous bestsellers, has over a million Twitter followers, has given a TED talk and enjoys lucrative speaking engagements at top-tier companies and universities. Kawasaki even provides an InDesign book template to get started.

Garage Technology Ventures co-founder Guy Kawasaki is snapped at BookExpo America where he makes an appearance to sign copies of his new book APE Author Publisher Entrepreneur - How to Publish a Book

Garage Technology Ventures co-founder Guy Kawasaki is snapped at BookExpo America where he makes an appearance to sign copies of his new book APE Author Publisher Entrepreneur - How to Publish a Book. Photographers try to get him to do something fun and spontaneous and so he holds up his camera and pretends to take pictures of the photographers. The former Apple worker wrote the book to explain how to write and finance a book how to publish and price it and how to market it online following some complicated and difficult experiences with publishing his.

How did you like the book? . To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all.

has quoted4 years ago. Aleister Crowley.

Kawasaki delivered a keynote speech based on his 2012 self-published book APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur - How to Publish a Book. But most book advances are only a tiny fraction of that, and he believes there are better ways to raise that money "than sucking up to a New York publisher for nine months. He recommended crowdfunding through platforms such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo

After reading APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book by Guy Kawasaki and Shawn Welch, my first reaction .

After reading APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book by Guy Kawasaki and Shawn Welch, my first reaction was, "Dammit, Guy, I finally get my own book published via the old-fashioned publisher route and barely 12 months later you show everyone how simple it can be to publish your own book!" My second reaction was that maybe I should have given self-publishing a harder look. Simple" is perhaps an understatement

"Essential reading (and reference) for modern authors, regardless of experience." - Kirkus Book Reviews "Nuts, bolts, and inspiration too. Once again, Guy delivers, kicking the shiitake out of anyone who would tell you that you shouldn't, wouldn't or couldn't write a book." -Seth Godin Author and founder of The Icarus Project. This version of APE was updated with the most recent content, facts, figures, tools, and resources on March 5th, 2013. To see what content has been added since the last update of APE please visit apethebook.com/updates. This is version 1.2 (Baldacci). In 2011 the publisher of one of my books, Enchantment, could not fill an order for 500 ebook copies of the book. Because of this experience, I self-published my next book, What the Plus!, and learned first-hand that self-publishing is a complex, confusing, and idiosyncratic process. As Steve Jobs said, "There must be a better way." With Shawn Welch, a tech wizard, I wrote APE to help people take control of their writing careers. APE's thesis is powerful yet simple: filling the roles of Author, Publisher and Entrepreneur yields results that rival traditional publishing. We call this "artisanal publishing"--that is, when writers who love their craft control the publishing process and produce high-quality books. APE is 300 pages of step-by-step, tactical advice and practical inspiration. If you want a hype-filled, get-rich-quick book, you should look elsewhere. On the other hand, if you want a comprehensive and realistic guide to self-publishing, APE is the answer.
Reviews about APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book (7):
Felolak
It's hard not to like Guy Kawasaki. I enjoyed reading APE. I enjoyed reading The Art of the Start and Enchantment. They made me feel good. He writes well, adopts a conversational tone like he's your equal -- like he's right there with you, a friend struggling right along side you.

I like that he's promised to continually update APE. I like his commitment to quality; the book reads well and the copy is clean. His books sure go down easy -- a mixture of a little unique information, tons of generalities, a lot of platitudes and a healthy shot of "you can do it!" attitude simmering right beneath the surface.

The problem, then? He's out of touch. Kawasaki produces a nice book. But it's written from where he's sitting. This is a man who has published numerous bestsellers, has over a million Twitter followers, has given a TED talk and enjoys lucrative speaking engagements at top-tier companies and universities. All of this is impressive.

That's not where most self-published authors are coming from, though.

The first few chapters are spent on throat clearing and general padding such as:

Should You Write a Book?
-->Not a bad question to ask, but seems out of place given the audience -- most people who pick this up have probably already started and want help on the back-end production process.
A Review of Traditional Publishing
An Introduction to Self-Publishing
--> Both of these rudimentary, stripped down publishing histories pale in comparison to what's offered on Wikipedia. More to the point: they are totally unnecessary.
Tools -- wherein he states you need a computer and a word processor. This takes about six or seven pages. Seriously. But he does take care to plug Evernote, a company he advises for. Nice.
How to Finance Your Book -- he talks about Kickstarter and how Seth Godin raised a ludicrous amount of money on it, financing his own release many times over.

Seth Godin has one of the most trafficked blogs in the world. No one is going to fund an unknown indie author's Kickstarter. Unless that author gets absurdly lucky and catches lightning in a bottle.

I wouldn't hold your breath for such miracles.

Some might applaud Kawasaki for starting slow. I don't mind the beginner's overview -- but if you don't know that you need a computer to self-publish an eBook, then you're probably not cut out for this business. The first 10 chapters could be condensed into one. As it stands, it takes about 30 minutes of reading until you'll hit anything you can even apply. Which is the cover section.

At this point, he suggest crowd-sourcing along with a few designers he's used. This is fine, but he totally misses out on Fiverr, eLance [e.g. low cost, decent quality options] or various well-known indie freelancers like Damonza (who is expensive, but seems downright cheap compared to some of Kawasaki's recommendations).

Which is, really, the problem: he gives basically no useful advice on how to promote your book, and suggests that you need to spend thousands to create a professional product. You don't.

APE sells based on his name recognition and his ridiculously large email/Twitter followings. It was basically a guaranteed money-maker for him, unless he went ape (geddit?) and spent a hundred grand. Kawasaki has no idea how to bootstrap a pro indie book, because he didn't have to (ironic, given The Art of the Start's emphasis on this). He didn't have to sit down, as an unknown author, and figure out how to get noticed on Amazon, B&N, Kobo et al.

He hasn't achieved his success in self-publishing. He hasn't lived the hard slog -- all the days seeing your book sell 0 copies and flounder on the Amazon ranks. Firing off countless emails to tiny blogs and getting zero responses. Anyone would be hard-pressed to muck up a book release if they had Kawasaki's extended network. Hats off to him for building his brand, but HE DIDN'T DO IT VIA HIS SELF-PUBLISHING CAREER.

Most of the people reading this, however, will be looking to build an indie career. He's never done it -- therefore he can't tell you how to do it. It's very much akin to a famous children's book author writing a book on how to write slasher screenplays...when their screenplay only got greenlit because of their brand. Their success wasn't because of that work, but of something they did in the past. Yeah, Kawasaki's a writer. Yeah, he's a good businessman. But he doesn't know jack about the intricacies and specifics of the indie game.

To be clear, this book doesn't suffer because of his previous successes. The value of the information only suffers because he didn't spend the time to get dirty and see how the people doing this for a living went about it. I'd say Kawasaki missed a golden opportunity -- had he coupled his unparalleled business experience with a solid, realistic plan for unknown authors (perhaps culled from the numerous blogs, books and other resources available -- or interviewing these folks), APE could have been an incredible book.

Instead, he lives in a land where resources are seemingly unlimited and time is of no consequence (although it frees up a lot of time when you can get your followers to beta-read and edit your books at no cost). During the course of APE, Kawasaki recommends you purchase a MacBook Air to write on (although he admits this isn't a necessity), learn Adobe InDesign to format your books, shell out money for a good editor, offer autographed dust jacket covers and produce a useful infographic to advertise your book.

The approximate costs:
MacBook Air - $914
InDesign CS6 - $20 a month or $640
Editor - $500 - $5,000
Autographed Covers - $2/ea; a lot of self-published books don't even see a print release, let alone a hardcover
Infographic - $1500 (this is according to him; go to eLance for much, much cheaper ones)

At this point we're up to two thousand nine hundred thirty six dollars in costs, and we haven't included the cover -- perhaps the most crucial element of the book.

You can release a book on Kindle and other platforms for about five bucks with a decent cover from Fiverr. Even if you get a quality pro to do the formatting and the cover, you can usually walk away with an upfront cost lower than $200.

For reference: over half of indie authors make less than five hundred dollars a year.

The sales of What the Plus and APE piggybacked off of his previous ventures. I applaud him for his entrepreneurial success, but let's not confuse things here -- if Kawasaki released this book with the support that an unknown author enjoys, he would have a much different outlook. And, I suspect, much better and far more realistic advice to offer.

For around the same price, you can grab Michael Alvear's Make a Killing on Kindle, Tom Corson Knowles' The Kindle Publishing Bible, and download the weekly Self Publishing Podcast for free. This trifecta will teach you much more -- almost all you need to know about Kindle (and self-publishing in general) -- from people who have struggled and know what it's really like to be an indie author. All sans the boredom, preposterous purchase recommendations and superfluous pages.

UPDATE 10/20/2015: With the indie publishing landscape moving so fast, I figured I should update my list of recommended resources. While the Self Publishing Podcast remains valuable - and free - the two books I mentioned in the paragraph above are less pertinent today than they were two and a half years ago. Excellent and current resources include the Writers' Cafe on the KBoards forums (do a Google search) and Susan Kaye Quinn's FOR LOVE OR MONEY (if you're a fiction writer). I would also pick up a copy of Nick Stephenson's READER MAGNETS, which is currently a free download on Amazon.
MisterMax
Fantastic starting point for self-publishing a book.

I am currently working to self-publish a non-fiction book of my own. Consequently I frequently find myself drilling down into various details using a very wide variety of books, articles, and other reference information. In a few areas I may now know as much or more than Kawasaki seemed to know when he wrote APE. Even so, I continually find myself referencing APE anytime I need breadth of thought and information in an area I have not drilled down into. As a broad overview and jumping off point, it continues to be the best actionable place to start I know of.

As an example let us consider doing interior layout for a book. APE makes it pretty clear InDesign is generally the best choice for laying out a print book. Kawasaki even provides an InDesign book template to get started. Since first reading APE I have spent a great deal of time learning InDesign, Typography, and improving my design skills as I have worked through typesetting a very complex non-fiction book with a large number of figures and other complex aspects. None of this is covered in any detail by APE.

If you want to learn Typography you should consider reading Robert Bringhurst's "The Elements Of Typographic Style" rather than APE. If you want to learn InDesign you will likely be best served by using Adobe's online reference manual and perhaps some video tutorials. As a graphic design novice, I find "The Non-Designer's Design Book" by Robin Williams to be fantastic. Occasionally the advice found elsewhere as well as my own experience conflicts with that of APE. Yet time and time again I find myself referring back to APE for broader context related aspects of self-publishing. The average self-publishing book would long ago have been collecting dust on my digital book shelf.
Ienekan
Guy Kawasaki hit it out of the park with this book. So much has changed in the writing and publishing world and he manages to make it all easy to digest and understand. I created a small publisher back in 2004. APE got me back up to speed on the newest trends and the different companies and tools available to make it happen again.

It gave me the kick I needed to get my second book to the finish line.

You will love it if you are excited about getting your writing out to the world. He walks you through everything step-by-step.

Fantastic book and worth every penny.

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