» » All Bat, No Glove: A History of the Designated Hitter

Download All Bat, No Glove: A History of the Designated Hitter fb2

by G. Richard McKelvey

  • ISBN: 078641944X
  • Category: Reference
  • Author: G. Richard McKelvey
  • Subcategory: Encyclopedias & Subject Guides
  • Other formats: rtf doc lit txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McFarland Publishing (September 2004)
  • Pages: 213 pages
  • FB2 size: 1320 kb
  • EPUB size: 1555 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 270
Download All Bat, No Glove: A History of the Designated Hitter fb2

All Bat, No Glove: A Hist. has been added to your Cart. I could go on and on all day about the controversy of the Designated Hitter. In conclusion, I say that let the best hitters face the best pitchers when the game is on the line. Let the players decide the game on the field

All Bat, No Glove: A Hist. Let the players decide the game on the field. If a pitcher can hit for himself without compromising the offense and other defensive players in the lineup can sacrifice bunt, hit behind the runner, and the other eight defensive guys can be used interchangably, then why do you need a DH?

All Bat, No Glove book. The basic elements of baseball remain essentially the same as they were. All Bat, No Glove: A History of the Designated Hitter.

All Bat, No Glove book. by. G. Richard McKelvey. The basic elements of baseball remain essentially the same as they were when the first professional game was played in the 1870s. Changes in this sport-when they come-come slowly.

135 games as a designated hitter that season, resulting in some controversy over his selection. McKelvey, G. Richard (2004). 1 Key. 2 American League winners. 3 National League winners. p. 160. ISBN 0-7864-1944-X. Retrieved June 5, 2009. a b "1957 Brooklyn Dodgers Batting, Pitching, and Fielding Statistics". Sports Reference LLC.

Given for. Most outstanding designated hitter in the American League in Major League . a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y McKelvey, G. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. Most outstanding designated hitter in the American League in Major League Baseball.

by G. Select Format: Paperback.

All Bat, No Glove: A History of the Designated Hitter McKelvey, G. Richard Pape. The Athenaid, a Poem, by the Author of Leonidas. of 2; Volume 2 by Richard Glove. 1962 MARK THE GLOVE BOY - THE LAST DAYS OF RICHARD NIXON Mark Harris 1st Ed Book. Ships in a business day with tracking.

McKelvey, G. Richard. The Saturday Evening Post. com/books?id HxxcVNKQpsMC&printsec frontcover. Rader, Benjamin G. Baseball: A History of America's Game.

McKelvey, G. Book:Major League Baseball awards.

For the first four seasons of the award (1957 to 1960), individual awards were presented to left fielders, center fielders, and right fielders. From 1961 through 2010, the phrase "at each position" was no longer strictly accurate, since the prize was presented to three outfielders irrespective of their specific position. Any combination of outfielders, often three center fielders, could win the award in the same year. Critics called for awarding a single Gold Glove for each individual outfield position, arguing that.

January 2006 · NINE A Journal of Baseball History and Culture. McKelvey tracks the early dh's statistics, the increase American League attendance and offensive numbers, as well as some player and fan reactions to the change. Lisa Doris Alexander. NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture 1. (2006) 145-146 One of the more contentious debates raging among baseball fans concerns the designated hitter. McKelvey also discusses the unintended effect the dh had on pitching, as the new position allowed "Junior Circuit pitchers to go more innings in games and control their own destinies.

18 g. richard mckelvey, all bat, no glove: a history of the designated hitter 6 (2004)

18 g. richard mckelvey, all bat, no glove: a history of the designated hitter 6 (2004). Rex Lardner, The Pitchers Are Ruining the Game, . TIMES, June 16, 1968 (Magazine), at 12 (observing that ll kinds of records were set by pitchers during the 1967 baseball season – including 153 shutouts in the American League, 82 games in the National League in which pitchers gave up no more than three hits, and. 1189 batters struck out by Cleveland pitchers). 21 MCKELVEY, supra note 18, at 10. 22 Joseph Durso, Gibson is Named Unanimously Cy Young Award Winner in National League, .

The basic elements of baseball remain essentially the same as they were when the first professional game was played in the 1870s. Changes in this sport--when they come--come slowly. In 1973, one of baseball's most drastic changes was legislated: American League owners voted to add one player to the traditional nine-man line-up, creating a "10-man game" in which a designated hitter (or DH) had a regular spot in the batting order, and he or a replacement for him batted for his club's pitcher(s) throughout the game. This change to baseball rules was approved in the hopes that DH's would provide a spark for the AL's sagging offenses; an explosion in hits, homers and runs would draw more people to their ballparks and enable their clubs to surpass the National League in the annual attendance race. This work offers a fascinating exploration of the history and place of the designated hitter in the major leagues.
Reviews about All Bat, No Glove: A History of the Designated Hitter (2):
Jugami
just-the-facts approach, in exhaustive (sometimes exhausting) detail. avoids the broader issues so not the definitive book on the subject.
Unirtay
If you are a National League fan, you prefer a pitcher batting "helping his own cause." If you are an American League fan, you enjoy having a designated hitter batting anywhere in the lineup for the pitcher without removing that pitcher and subsequent pitchers from the game. However, the DH is not mandatory as stated in the third paragraph in part (b) of Rule 6.10. I am a baseball fan so having a Designated Hitter doesnt matter to me or not. I feel the same intensity when the Yankees and Red Sox play together as I do when the Mets and Braves play without a DH. I am not for or against the DH because it has helped bring more fans into the game with increased offense while keeping pitchers in longer without pinch-hitting. However, it has increased team ERAs and pitchers' ERAs. NL fans say that the DH decreases strategy such as whether pinch-hitting for pitchers late in a game or not and double switches along with moving a pitcher to a defensive position for one batter and back to the mound, etc. There are strategies with the DH that are unique to the AL such as putting a leadoff man in the top of the lineup and at the end of the lineup, but this can be done in NL too by putting the Pitcher in the 8th spot or higher and having two leadoff hitters back-to-back. (Remember Tony La Russa doing this in 1998 to help Mark McGwire hit with men on base instead of getting an IBB with 1st base open). I could go on and on all day about the controversy of the Designated Hitter. In conclusion, I say that let the best hitters face the best pitchers when the game is on the line. Let the players decide the game on the field. If a pitcher can hit for himself without compromising the offense and other defensive players in the lineup can sacrifice bunt, hit behind the runner, and the other eight defensive guys can be used interchangably, then why do you need a DH? On the other hand, if a pitcher isnt too good at the plate and there is a player who is bad in the field, why not use a DH.

Two things I would like seen done are having a DH bat in all All-Star games and have the NL institute the DH as a part of its system but go by the 3rd paragraph in part (b) in Rule 6.10 to avoid using the DH unless there are interleague games, etc.

Related to All Bat, No Glove: A History of the Designated Hitter fb2 books: