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by Kevin Crossley-Holland

  • ISBN: 1842555707
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Kevin Crossley-Holland
  • Subcategory: Sociology
  • Other formats: lit mbr lrf txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Orion Children's Books (March 1, 2008)
  • FB2 size: 1686 kb
  • EPUB size: 1350 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 385
Download Gatty's Tale. Kevin Crossley-Holland fb2

Kevin John William Crossley-Holland (born 7 February 1941) is an English translator, children's author and poet.

Kevin John William Crossley-Holland (born 7 February 1941) is an English translator, children's author and poet. His best known work is probably the Arthur trilogy (2000–2003), for which he won the Guardian Prize and other recognition. Crossley-Holland and his 1985 novella Storm won the annual Carnegie Medal from the Library Association, recognising the year's outstanding children's book by a British author.

Crossley-Holland has translated Beowulf from the Anglo-Saxon, and his retellings of traditional tales include The Penguin Book of Kevin Crossley-Holland is a well-known poet and prize-winning author for children

Crossley-Holland has translated Beowulf from the Anglo-Saxon, and his retellings of traditional tales include The Penguin Book of Kevin Crossley-Holland is a well-known poet and prize-winning author for children. His books include Waterslain Angels, a detective story set in north Norfolk in 1955, and Moored Man: A Cycle of North Norfolk Poems; Gatty's Tale, a medieval pilgrimage novel; and the Arthur trilogy (The Seeing Stone, At the Crossing-Places and King of the Middle March), which combines historical fiction with the retelling of Arthurian legend

Kathryn Hughes sets out on Kevin Crossley-Holland's vividly imagined medieval quest, Gatty's Tale. Crossley-Holland is something of a wizard when it comes to evoking the texture of everyday medieval life.

Kathryn Hughes sets out on Kevin Crossley-Holland's vividly imagined medieval quest, Gatty's Tale. As Gatty and her companions move across the known world, Crossley-Holland gives us everything we need to know to make sense of their journey, from the way to mix a poultice for a shattered hand (pig's fat and wine plus a bit of smoked moss) to the easy availability of St David's toe (for the right price pardoners will sell. Welsh pilgrims anything).

Kevin Crossley-Holland - Kevin John William Crossley Holland ( 7. Februar 1941 in Mursley, North Buckinghamshire) ist ein britischer Kinder und Jugendbuchautor, Dichter, Übersetzer und Mitglied der Royal Society of Literature. Crossley Holland wuchs in Whiteleaf auf. Crossley-Holland - Kevin John William Crossley Holland ( 7.

Crossley-Holland and his 1985 novella Storm won the annual Carnegie Medal from the .

Crossley-Holland and his 1985 novella Storm won the annual Carnegie Medal from the Library Association, recognising the year's outstanding children's book by a British author. Crossley-Holland has also written the libretti for two operas by Nicola LeFanu, The Green Children (1966) and The Wildman (1976), and for a chamber opera about Nelson, Haydn, and Emma Hamilton Awards.

Kevin Crossley-Holland. 3 people like this topic.

King Arthur's World (2005). Crossing to Paradise (2008). Tales from the Mabinogion (1977) (with Gwyn Thomas). The Dead Moon: And Other Tales from East Anglia and the Fen Country (1982). Waterslain: And Other Poems (poems) (1986). British Folk Tales: New Versions (1987).

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Gatty's Tale. Kevin Crossley-Holland By Kevin Crossley-Holland. Condition: Very Good.

Kevin John William Crossley-Holland (born 7 February 1941) is an English poet, translator, and children's author. His best known work may now be the Arthur trilogy, published around age sixty (2000–2003), for which he won the Guardian Prizeand other recognition. Born in Mursley, north Buckinghamshire, Crossley-Holland grew up in Whiteleaf, a small village in the Chilterns

Of all the characters in THE SEEING STONE and AT THE CROSSING-PLACES, it is Gatty the village girl - steadfast, forthright, innocent and wise - who has won the hearts of readers. This is her story. Gatty, who has never been further than her own village, is picked by Lady Gwyneth of Ewloe to join the band of pilgrims accompanying her to Jerusalem. The journey is fraught with danger and uncertainty, but opens Gatty's eyes to new wonders and transforms her. A joyful, heartrending, triumphant novel, packed with incident, teeming with characters, and a long-awaited treat for the many readers who want to know what happened to Gatty after the Arthur trilogy. This ambitious novel creates a magnificently vivid and realistic picture of life and times in the Europe of 1202.
Reviews about Gatty's Tale. Kevin Crossley-Holland (6):
breakingthesystem
Had to get it after reading the Arthur series. Loved the character and wanted to know what happened to her. The pilgrimage goes on a bit too long and Crossley-Hollands vivid and endless descriptions of everything sometimes gets overbearing but if you enjoyed the Arthur series then you should probably get this as well. You get invested in the characters because you are part of their long arduous journey and you dont even realize it until the end. I found myself crying openly during one scene toward the end despite myself. "God in heaven! God in heaven!" From simple field girl with no future to a strong young woman with a place in the world and the wisdom gained by an Odyssey like adventure for both her feet and her heart.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
This book is excellent, and it brings to a conclusion the Arthur Trilogy.
Kajikus
My daughter was excited to get this book. It was a surprise to her, since she didn't know about it's existence. She is looking forward to reading it.
Onaxan
I picked up this book from the library on an impulse: my current topic of interest is the Crusades, and "Gatty's Tale", looked as though it would satisfy this itch. Chronicling the journey of a young girl who undertakes a pilgrimage, Kevin Crossley-Holland takes his spunky little protagonist on a fascinating journey from Wales to Jerusalem, as well as from girlhood to womanhood.

The year is 1203, and Gatty is a fifteen year old field-girl employed by Lady Gwyneth de Ewloe as a chamber-servant to accompany her on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Lady Gwyneth wants to travel to Jerusalem to obtain forgiveness from some as-yet unknown sin, and has gathered together nine pilgrims to make the journey with her across Europe to the heart of the world.

The pilgrims are an assorted lot: a husband and wife, a music teacher, a lady-in-waiting, a priest, a cook...all of them make up an extended family as they brave the perils of the journey over mountain and across desert, and we are with them as they squabble, pray, suffer, tell stories, joke and grieve their way across Europe in a fellowship that is not unlike those of "The Canterbury Tales." As they say, it is the journey and not the destination that is important, and not one of our pilgrims, least of all Gatty herself, is left unchanged by the experiences and trials they go through.

Although I'm no expert on the subject, the book seems to be meticulously researched, and Holland has a gift of making medieval life seem real and immediate. One of the greatest challenges of writing historical-fiction is to not only make the past come to life, but to write in a way in which the differences between then and now are integrated into the story itself, and not presented to the reader as story-halting info-dumps. Holland expertly weaves the day-to-day life of the pilgrims into the narrative without alienating or confusing the reader.

Gatty makes for a lovely young heroine. Although only a field-girl, she is impulsive, bright, compassionate and possesses an innate sense of wisdom and openness to the world around her that makes for several thought-provoking moments. She compares her journey to a story that contains several forever-unknown stories within it, referring to the people she meets or sees on her way, and on returning from her great pilgrimage and attempts to share her experiences with a friend she realizes that "no one is really quite as interested in us as we are in ourselves."

Holland also gifts her with a beautiful singing voice that grows and develops at the same rate that she does, and has a solid grasp on her speech patterns that provide much of the charm of this book. All of it serves to make Gatty a living, breathing young woman and one of the most vivid characters I've come across in a long time.

However, not all of Gatty's companions make it to the Holy Land; in fact most are abruptly dropped from the narrative, not from death, but other extenuating circumstances. Sadly, once they are gone we never meet up with (most of) them again. Perhaps this adds to the realism of the book, in that we loose some people along the way, but from a storytelling perspective, it feels as though Holland simply got tired of them and wrote them out of the story. But by this stage, I had grown quite attached to some of the pilgrims, and was disappointed that we never got to see them again (and only discover their fates from a third-hand account).

It also became apparent to me early on, that this story was in fact a "spin-off" of sorts from the award-winning Arthur trilogy, which I have yet to read. Although I immensely enjoyed "Gatty's Tale," I'm sure that it would have carried more meaning and resonance for me if I had read the previous trilogy, in which Gatty's life, friendships and personality were established. Though I highly recommend "Gatty's Tale," I'd first recommend tracking down The Seeing Stone - Arthur Trilogy, Book One and its sequels in order to get a firmer grasp on Gatty's history and what she means to the author.
Agarus
Of all four lovely, lyrical books in this series, Gatty's Tale is the best. I was sucked in from the very first page. Crossley-Holland uses just the right words and none extra to give us Gatty's voice. Gatty goes to Jerusalem for herself--but also as proxy for the people she loves. The writing is personal and specific, and I felt that although she is a fictional character, she was proxy for me, the reader, as well.

I read the previous review (where the reader couldn't resist, and read the last chapter first), and forced myself not to peek. But I was very satisfied with the ending when I got there! (And yet it still looks like there could be another book out of it.) Thank you, Mr. Crossley-Holland--well done!
Gio
I am so very pleased (at last) to read the further adventures of our beloved Gatty. I loved Arthur, but Gatty stole my heart. Kevin has outdone himself on this one. It is so believeable and filled with samples of Gatty's wisdom, like "One is one and..." It is wonderful to see her adventureousness and yet see a maturing young woman evolving. This book reveals one of Kevin's finest characters. It is the only book that I have ever read the last chapter first. I just had to know. I hope that the door is open for further adventures. The historical information is accurate and so generous in the story that we truly have an inside view of life in the Middle Ages. A wonderful read for any age.

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