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by Shirley Christian

  • ISBN: 0394535758
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Shirley Christian
  • Subcategory: Sociology
  • Other formats: azw lrf docx mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House Inc; 1st edition (July 1, 1985)
  • Pages: 337 pages
  • FB2 size: 1148 kb
  • EPUB size: 1802 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 143
Download Nicaragua: Revolution in the Family fb2

It is unlikely that I would have appreciated this book in the same way if I had read it earlier.

It is unlikely that I would have appreciated this book in the same way if I had read it earlier. As a Nicaraguan in her early thirties and most importatnly, whose family did not leave the country during the revolution or shortly after, this book touches upon very personal issues

The book received broad acclaim. Given its divisive subject matter, it was praised for its even-handed-ness.

Nicaragua: Revolution in the family

Nicaragua: Revolution in the family. New York: Random House. 7r list of major figures in Nicaragua. but the terceristas had saved themselves by living abroad this group now. seeks out the Nicaraguan establishment 37 strategy hatched by Sergio and Humberto?

Her first book, Nicaragua: Revolution in the Family, was published in 1985 by Random House.

Her first book, Nicaragua: Revolution in the Family, was published in 1985 by Random House. Shirley Christian was born in a farmhouse in Pettis County, Missouri, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, where she attended public schools. She was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University during the 1973-74 academic year.

Anyone seriously interested in contemporary Nicaragua will have to read this book.

Shirley Christian is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author, known for reporting on the Central American crisis .

Shirley Christian is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author, known for reporting on the Central American crisis during the 1970s and 1980s. Christian has worked as a foreign correspondent for the New York Times, Miami Herald, and Associated Press.

Nicaragua: Revolution in the Family. By Shirley Christian. Nicaragua: Revolution in the Family. This is the best analysis we yet possess of the fall of the Somoza regime and the rise of the Sandinistas. The author, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and foreign affairs writer for The New York Times, has firsthand experience and an unusually good insight into Nicaraguan culture and society.

Shirley Christian covered Central America for The Miami Herald from 1979 to 1982 and is the author of the forthcoming ''Nicaragua: Revolution in the Family. New York: Readers Books. A Novel of Nicaragua.

Nicaragua, revolution in the family, Nicaragua, revolution in the family, کتابخانه دیجیتال و فن آوری اطلاعات . It is that Latin America is not quite a grown-up place and, therefore, is worthy of intense US interest onl. More).

Nicaragua, revolution in the family, Nicaragua, revolution in the family, کتابخانه دیجیتال و فن آوری اطلاعات دانشگاه امام صادق(ع). From guatemala city (guatemala) in 1980. 1. The Allen Institute for Artificial IntelligenceProudly built by AI2 with the help of our.

Shirley Ann Christian, journalist, author. Nicaragua : revolucion en la familia/Nicaragua : Revolution in the Family. This book is about the Nicaragua revolution ) This book is about the Nicaragua revolution. Nieman fellow Harvard University, 1973-1974; recipient Pulitzer prize for international reporting, 1981, George Polk Memorial award for foreign reporting, 1981. The author describes the why and how of the conflict from the Somoza era to the first Sandanista election. 47627/?tag prabook0b-20.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter chronicles the events in Nicaragua that led up to the revolt against Somoza, the consolidation of power by the Sandinistas, and the present period of unrest and probes the viewpoints of a wide range of Nicaraguans
Reviews about Nicaragua: Revolution in the Family (7):
Leyl
Different perspective of the Nicaraguan history compared with the one that is taught in the school
Adrietius
Revolution in the Family is a great chaser to "The World Was Going Our Way: The KGB and the Battle for the the Third World - Newly Revealed Secrets from the Mitrokhin Archive".
Coiron
Shirley Christian has compiled a masterful journalistic investigation of Nicaragua in a time of fluidity where salesman from wherever would do whatever and sale to whoever to keep the money flowing. The author has generally accomplished this monumental task.
Loved this comment on page 192, “Nicaragua lived in geographical circumstances and with internal issues that could not be wept away with revolutionary rhetoric.”
Various aspects of Nicaraguan culture, like the religion, were manipulated depending on what side one was on. This is the same in the USA regarding arguing for or against the Affordable Care Act.
When the Sandinistas take over they attempt to take over the distribution and commercialization of goods. This creates conflict and shortages. Further, on page 302 the author points out when the Sandinistas tried to take over the Miskito’s, the Sandinistas who rely on class struggle as a motivational element find themselves up against a native people who acknowledged “no class differences at the outset.” Additionally, the Sandinistas “could not accept the communal ownership advocated by the Miskitos.”
Power struggles and who is in control echo though out the book. Ones loyalty could be betrayed in an instant if it led to another’s being placed in power. Not unlike many conflicts, basic survival also paralleled the switch of sides.
Page 374 sums up much of the conflict. “The leaders of the Sandinista Front intended to establish a Leninist system from the day they marched into Managua, whether they called it that or not. Their goal was to assure themselves the means to control nearly every aspect of Nicaraguan life, from beans and rice to religion.” While any tragic conflict can be distilled into personalities and who gets power, at best this story can be structured such that the age-old argument comes to the surface of which yields a better quality of life for the masses, collective capitalism, collective socialism, or a fluid pluralistic amalgamation of the two. Time will tell.
Risinal
Another good book about the Nicaragua revolution. This is dated by a few years since it was written in 1985. Christian does a nice job of detailing the why and hows of the conflict from the Somoza era to the first Sandanista election. She also does a nice summary history of Sandino. Sandino was not a Communist, and at first did not oppose U.S. intervention. Later he did and also led a Robin Hood type of existence. This book did not have any pictures, and I feel most good history and current affairs books should. This was the only short coming of the book.

This is nice readable book about the conflict. Kinzer's book about the conflict covers the entire affair. Both reporters work for the New York Times. I felt Christian's book was more critical of the Sandanistas (FSLN).
Manona
The Nicaraguan revolution was perceived to be motivated by some key obvious factors:the need to overthrow a dictator, the need to foster equality for all, and the need to create a democracy. Shirley Christian was the only foreign journalist who captured the nuances of the revolt by pointing out how personalities, family quarrels, and social class influenced the direction and depth of revolutionary change. The insight that makes the most impact--in my view--relates to the role that social class has on revolutionary incentives. Many Sandinista leaders that grew up poor showed that their ideological aspirations were secondary to their social aspirations. Class envy became a strong undercurrent in what, on the surface, were ideological battles. Little by little, the Sandinista leaders who came from the bourgeoisie were marginalized in favor of those who came from poverty and who 20 years later behave like the new rich. This book explains in detail the intricate family and social connections and their implications for the behavior of the Sandinista Government. This pattern of behavior can be seen in other countries and other revolutions where social envy trumped ideology. A great read.
Hadadel
This book is the only work about Nicaragua I would recommend. Sadly she did not follow up with a second volume.If she had, she would have given readers the opportunity to truly receive an unbiased view of the effect that the 1979 revolution has had upon the lives of the people of Nicaragua these past three decades.
Neol
A factually accurate account of the revoultion in Nicaragua with precise details l the majors players(both people and countries). Reads like a text book.
This is, without a doubt, the most objective and well-rounded book on the Nicaraguan Revolution of 1979. It is also an extraordinary example of investigative journalism!

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