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by Richard Allen,Shelby Steele

  • ISBN: 1400106036
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Richard Allen,Shelby Steele
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Other formats: mbr doc lrf txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tantor Audio; Unabridged edition (January 22, 2008)
  • FB2 size: 1259 kb
  • EPUB size: 1230 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 826
Download A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can't Win fb2

By "can't win' in Steele's subtitle, Steele does not mean that he shouldn't win, but that in these two dilemmas, Barrack Obama cannot win because either way, he sacrifices some part of his identity and will risk alienation from either the white or black community.

By "can't win' in Steele's subtitle, Steele does not mean that he shouldn't win, but that in these two dilemmas, Barrack Obama cannot win because either way, he sacrifices some part of his identity and will risk alienation from either the white or black community. And while Steele is often called a 'conservative,' there is no hint in this book of disrespect for the President. This is not an Ann Coulter book.

A surprisingly good book about the psychology of Barack Obama and of race relations in America. This book provides a clear understanding about why minorities refuse to move beyond their victim-hood mindset into the more powerful mindset of self determination. I have never understood Barack Obama or American race relations so well. Thanks to Shelby Steele for writing such an incredibly insightful book!

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In Shelby Steele's beautifully wrought and thoughtprovoking new book, A Bound Man, the award-winning and . Says Steele, Americans are constrained by a racial correctness so totalitarian that we are afraid even to privately ask ourselves what we think about racial matters.

In Shelby Steele's beautifully wrought and thoughtprovoking new book, A Bound Man, the award-winning and bestselling author of The Content of Our Character. Like Obama, most of us find it easier to program ourselves for correctness rather than risk knowing and expressing what we truly feel. Obama emerges as a kind of Everyman in whom we can see our own struggle to accept and honor what we honestly feel about race.

A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can't Wi.

A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can't Win. by Shelby Steele. In Shelby Steele's beautifully wrought and thoughtprovoking new book, A Bound Man, the award-winning and bestselling author of The Content of Our Character attests that Senator Barack Obama's groundbreaking quest for the highest office in the land is fast becoming a galvanizing occasion beyond mere presidential politics, one that is forcing a national dialogue on the current state of race.

The problem for Obama, and why he can never become President, supposedly, is that he behaves like a. .

The problem for Obama, and why he can never become President, supposedly, is that he behaves like a Bargainer, a latter-day Satchmo, in front of whites, but more like a challenger when trying to appease blacks. In sum, Shelby Steele makes a persuasive case in A Bound Man, yet in my mind there remains the distinct possibility that there might be a third type of black person, and maybe that's precisely why so many folks of every hue find something about Barack so appealing

In his 2007 book, A Bound Man, Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can’t Win, Hoover Institute Fellow and African-American conservative scholar Shelby Steele defines two types of African-American public figures.

In his 2007 book, A Bound Man, Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can’t Win, Hoover Institute Fellow and African-American conservative scholar Shelby Steele defines two types of African-American public figures

unfortunately named A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can’t Win by Shelby Steele

Make room on the bookshelf - perhaps somewhere between Dow 36,000 by Glassman and Hassett or The End of History and the Last Man by Fukuyama - for the unfortunately named A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can’t Win by Shelby Steele. Mr. Steele, a prolific author on racial issues in America and a fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, said he had had plenty of time to get used to the snickering about the title of his book, which was published late last year by the Free Press, part of Simon & Schuster, and officially contradicted last week.

Steele wrote a short book, A Bound Man: Why We are Excited about Obama and Why He Can't Win .

Steele wrote a short book, A Bound Man: Why We are Excited about Obama and Why He Can't Win, published in December 2007. The book contained Steele's analysis of Barack Obama's character as a child born to a mixed couple who then had to grow as a black man. Steele concluded that Obama is a "bound man" to his "black identity. Steele gives this description of his conclusion: There is a price to be paid even for fellow-traveling with a racial identity as politicized and demanding as today's black identity.

A BOUND MAN Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can't Wi. A lot has transpired since Shelby Steele wrote A BOUND MAN-so much so that it's not clear whether the book is even relevant anymore.

A BOUND MAN Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can't Win. by Shelby Steele Read by Richard Allen. Steele's premise is that Barack Obama is caught between the two ways in which blacks have traditionally operated in the . by bargaining or challenging

From the New York Times bestselling and controversial author Shelby Steele comes an illuminating examination of the complex racial issues that confront presidential candidate Barack Obama in his race for the White House, a quest that will be one of those galvanizing occasions that forces a national dialogue on the current state of race relations in America.Steele argues that Senator Obama is caught between two classic postures that blacks have always used to make their way in the white American mainstream: bargaining and challenging. Bargainers strike a "bargain" with white America in which they say, "I will not rub America's ugly history of racism in your face if you will not hold my race against me." Bill Cosby's sitcom in the 1980s was the classic example of bargaining. Obama also sends "bargaining" signals to white America, and whites respond with considerable gratitude-which explains the special aura of excitement that surrounds him.But in order to garner the black vote-which is absolutely necessary for victory in the primaries and the general election-Obama must also posture as a challenger. Challengers are the opposite of bargainers. They charge whites with inherent racism and then demand that they prove themselves innocent by supporting black-friendly policies, such as affirmative action. If whites go along with this-thereby proving their innocence-they are granted absolution by the black challenger. The current black American identity is grounded in challenging. Obama must therefore posture as a challenger to win the black vote. However, challenging threatens Obama's white support. But bargaining threatens his black support. Thus, he is bound. He walks in an impossible political territory where any expression of what he truly feels puts him in jeopardy with one much-needed constituency or another. Only a kind of two-sided political mask, or an "above politics" posture, keeps the wolves at bay.
Reviews about A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can't Win (7):
Nahn
I debated with myself about whether to give this book 3 or 4 stars. So, first, let me start with the reasons I had for giving it three, and then reasons why I gave it four instead. First, the book is a "psycholigization" of now-President Barrack Obama. That is, the book is not at all a political tract, but is an "explanation" of why Barrack Obama is who he is, given his biracial upbringing. I confess that I don't tend to like "psycholigizations" because they are a bit squishy; that is, one can always 'psychologize' another's actions in a way that probably says more about the author than the 'subject' and verifying the correctness of the attempt is impossible. (That is, if Obama objected to the characterization in this book, Steele could always say, "Well, you think it is wrong, but you are wrong about your motivations, which are just hidden from your conscious view.")

But here is why I gave the book four stars: I think the book is very good IF it is approached as saying more about Steele's own biracial experience than about Obama's. And, as always, Steele is very good at articulating what he thinks the inner dynamics (and social dynamics) of race in America are. So, this book is really about being biracial as Steele perceives it. Obama, he says (and this was before his attainment of the presidency, which makes it all the more fascinating), has a dilemma: he can make race an issue in his candidacy and risk losing some support from his wider white audience, or he can keep race out of it and risk losing some support from the black community. He can be (as Steele thinks he mostly is) a "bargainer" who gains acceptance from a wider audience by being a 'non-threatening' black man (a black man who will not accuse whites of racism or hold America's past against them), or he can be an 'activist,' who focuses more on issues particularly affecting the black community.

I must stress that this book is not a political tract. By "can't win' in Steele's subtitle, Steele does not mean that he shouldn't win, but that in these two dilemmas, Barrack Obama cannot win because either way, he sacrifices some part of his identity and will risk alienation from either the white or black community. And while Steele is often called a 'conservative,' there is no hint in this book of disrespect for the President. (This is not an Ann Coulter book.) In fact, several times throughout the book, I paused with suspicion that, if the book didn't have Steele's name on it, readers would likely think that the author was of the left, maybe a critical race theorist; that is what the book is, an examination of the dilemmas one faces in American society being biracial.

In the end, I gave the book four stars, because I learned to read it as a book about Steele as much as or more than about President Obama. My suggestion, though, is that this book would be all the better if Steele wrote an update, appraising how the President has done in light of his now six or so years in the presidency (within which the President has commented on several racially charged incidents, such as the shooting death of Trayvon Martin). Otherwise, this book is made all the more interesting (if a bit dated) by its having been written before Obama became President.
Majin
Excellent account into Obama's and the black American psyche. Perhaps Mr. Steele should change the secod part of the subtitle, "... and Why He Can't Win," as the book remains as relevant today as it was in 2008. Mr. Steele wasn't talking about the possibility of winning the White House, but the impossibility of Obama and other like-minded blacks of taking a congruent and honest stand on Race. Mr. Steele takes my vote as the most important sociologist on the black American experience.
Wrathmaster
This little book is interesting and has some unique insights into the phenomenon of Barack Obama. Shelby Steele is also biracial and can speak to the tensions that produces in young black men with white mothers. His model of the two masks that blacks may assume to make their way in the white world, a world they do not feel part of, is useful. Steele names the masks, "Bargainers" and Challengers." I'm not sure I agree that Colin Powell, one of his examples, is a "bargainer." Powell came to maturity in the most merit-based institution in America, the US Army. Tiger Woods seems to me to have similarly risen in a merit-based institution of professional golf. His father was also a member of the military and so, probably did not instill the self-defeating sense of victimhood that so burdens the members of Reverend Wright's church. Aside from those quibbles, and Steele knows his world much better than I do, I think his insights are powerful.

His examples of Oprah Winfrey who has parleyed bargaining into billions of dollars, and Jesse Jackson, who has parleyed challenging into millions, are accurate. Obama has many of the characteristics he describes in bargainers. The book is a bit outdated as events have passed some of his theories. Obama slipped a bit in describng his grandmother who raised him as "a typical white person." The Reverend Wright has opened the door to the question of what Obama really thinks about whites. The mask has slipped, a least for a moment. Obama has been able to hold his movement of guilty whites together long enough to win the nomination. Whether it will last until November is unknown but this book has been helpful in trying to understand where Obama is coming from. It is not reassuring.
Kirinaya
... No one listened to Steele and look what we have now. Hell in a hand-basket.
I ℓ٥ﻻ ﻉ√٥υ
I bought and read this book when it came out, and hoped Steele had it right. Now that Obama has won twice, it's obvious Steele had him pegged completely wrong. The guy is a smash mouth, take no prisoners Chicago politician, a brilliant fund raiser and campaigner twice elected with comparative ease. He has played the race card extremely skillfully to advance his agenda, which is simply to bring about Cuban style "equality". After Steele's unfortunate miscalculation, I'm hesitant to predict how this chapter in our history will end, but I suspect it will not end well, particularly in foreign policy.

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