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by Rosemary Daniell

  • ISBN: 1892514265
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Rosemary Daniell
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Other formats: lrf mbr lrf rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hill Street Pr; 1st edition (September 1, 1999)
  • Pages: 305 pages
  • FB2 size: 1415 kb
  • EPUB size: 1457 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 343
Download Fatal Flowers : On Sin, Sex, and Suicide in the Deep South (Hill Street Classics) fb2

Fatal Flowers by Rosemary Daniell is an unexpected, brazen, ruthlessly honest, and beautifully written memoir. Daniell goes where the timid dare not go. She shocks and moves you to tears then makes you laugh out loud at the sometimes farce of family

Fatal Flowers by Rosemary Daniell is an unexpected, brazen, ruthlessly honest, and beautifully written memoir. She shocks and moves you to tears then makes you laugh out loud at the sometimes farce of family. Catherine Ann Jones, The Way of Story, Heal Your Self with Writing, and Freud's Oracle.

Rosemary Daniell is one of the great writing teachers I’ve seen at work in the country.

Published September 1st 1999 by Hill Street Press (first published April 1st 1980). Fatal Flowers: On Sin, Sex, and Suicide in the Deep South. 1892514265 (ISBN13: 9781892514264). Rosemary Daniell is one of the great writing teachers I’ve seen at work in the country. Rosemary Daniell is enormously gifted. Her work is risky – in the best sense of the word. She is one of the women by whom our age will be known in times to come.

Daniell, Rosemary, Women. New York : Avon Books. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Christine Wagner on December 17, 2009. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Rosemary Daniell's memoir, Fatal Flowers, resonantes with an honesty that strips away the stereotypical image foisted onto women, especially southern women, over centuries of male-dominated myth-making, and so, image-making. Born in 1936 and a product of the deep south, I grew up always feeling alone and alienated. Later in life I figured out the reason I felt so 'outside the pale'.

034717) Daniel, Rosemary. New York: Holt, Rinehart And Winston, 1980. Very Good+ in Fine DJ. A sexually explicit story of one woman's coming of age amid all the contradictions and tensions of a region that is drenched in eroticism, yet which punishes and represses every manifestation of sexuality ISBN: 0030221919 (Women, Southern States, Social Conditions).

The cathartic, deeply personal result of Daniell's desire to cope with her mother Melissa's suicide at the age of 60, Fatal Flowers became an instant classic, a roadmap for Southern women in the communal quest to confront and explode the stereotypes that have long repressed an. .

The cathartic, deeply personal result of Daniell's desire to cope with her mother Melissa's suicide at the age of 60, Fatal Flowers became an instant classic, a roadmap for Southern women in the communal quest to confront and explode the stereotypes that have long repressed and silenced them. Since its original publication two decades ago, this book's supporting audience has steadily increased

Daniell recounts her painful evolution from a passive girl to a liberated woman in the Deep South, a region drenched in eroticism which yet punishes and represses every manifestation of sexuality.

Daniell recounts her painful evolution from a passive girl to a liberated woman in the Deep South, a region drenched in eroticism which yet punishes and represses every manifestation of sexuality. Download Fatal flowers: On sin, sex, and suicide in the Deep South by Rosemary Daniell free. Fatal flowers: On sin, sex, and suicide in the Deep South by Rosemary Daniell fb2 DOWNLOAD FREE. A sexual tour of the Deep South : poems. D Scott Daniell Dolphin Book F 01.

The Deep South is terrible to women, but its women are wonderful. Daniell uses the word ""Southern"" so often and so rhapsodically that readers from north of Baltimore or west of Memphis may be tempted to scream. Still, if she's often absurd, she's never tiresome. She writes with wit, verve, and hearty vulgarity. She's a generous, perceptive observer, and she captures the sound of So.

The cathartic, deeply personal result of Daniell& desire to cope with her mother Melissa& suicide at the age of 60, Fatal Flowers became an instant classic, a roadmap for Southern women in the.

Daniell recounts her painful evolution from a passive girl to a liberated woman in the Deep South, a region that represses every manifestation of sexuality
Reviews about Fatal Flowers : On Sin, Sex, and Suicide in the Deep South (Hill Street Classics) (7):
Lanin
At first I thought this thing was a parody...it is just the most pathetic piece of writing I have read in abut 5 years and should sweep any "worst book"contest amazon.com ever runs. The author blames her mother, men, the South, the 20th century...you name it, everyone and everything but herself for her troubles. They aren't very interesting and don't make for significant reading. I found myself laughing out loud, but not where the author wanted me to.
If you are a radical hard-core lesbian socialist feminist you might enjoy this grim memoir; otherwise, please save your money.
Dori
I was working in a bookstore in the late 1980s when a dear friend thirty years older than myself put a copy of FATAL FLOWERS in my hand and told me to read it; that it had changed her life and might mine, or at least open my eyes to a new way of seeing and understanding women. How right she was. It did more than open my young male eyes, suddenly I started noticing everywhere around me the kinds of "issues" Daniell taught me to see affecting my young and old female friends. Aside from that, it is superbly written and good old fashioned storytelling. I read it straight through in three days. I'm very glad this important book is back in print. A lot of women (and men) need to read it.
Cogelv
This is a chronicle of writer Rosemary Daniell's life. Subjects we wouldn't dare discuss in public like sexuality are discussed so frankly. Gosh, the world has waited too long for a great work like this. She touches on subjects like the criteria for the feminine woman, the pure image of women that was maintained in the South( even though this is one of those universal cultural traits), as well as literature ,particularly Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind, that has visioned the South as some polite haven with delicate, feminine women. Other tough topics tackled is the cultural trait of woman as the modest, passive supplicant to the dominant, sexually aggressive man ( I am sorry I can't explain in complete sentences: I am not that eloquent) as well as her curiosity in her own sexuality.
Of course, honesty comes with a price: unpleasantness. Her life is certainly not pretty. But a good dose of reality can be nourishing.
LoboThommy
This book is a beautifully presented, 25-year anniversary reprint of a ground-breaking memoir from the Southern '70's. Its cover is one example of the ample photographs included throughout, which illuminate the author's life story. It is still just as personal, and just as gripping, as it was when first published. Because it tells of the wild ways of the so-called Sexual Revolution, it may not be for everyone; yet it is much more than such groupie stories as, "I'm Here With the Band." Daniell is also a poet, novelist, and journalist, whose creative non-fiction makes you see why many writers reccommend journalism as crucial training. I think would-be writers will find this book exciting, as well as readers who want a story they cannot stop reading. When published it was remarkable for its writer, as a woman, to discuss the things she did in such distinctive and daring language--not to mention, do what she did, such as her "sexual sky-diving" episode. Because of the conclusions Daniell reaches, as well as the story she tells, it is still a daring and controversial sort of book. I am one reader who cannot stop reading it, and I have reviewed it for College Seminars, for its rich themes and imagistic language. Along with her other books, Fatal Flowers is material for many critical studies--as well as a book that will hold your interest and keep you company at four in the morning. P.S. A banner on this page asks for comments from those under 13. If there is such a thing as a rating--this book is not for those under 13, in my opinon. Or even under 18, for that matter. But for those to whom life seen through a fine consciousness is exciting, this book is disturbingly excellent.
Golden Lama
I haven't finished it yet, but it's been a page turner. I was looking for something from the POV of a Southern Woman and this seems honest and insightful. It's also fast paced.
Olma
Great autobiographical account of one woman's determination to live her life as she wants in the deep South. Lots of family examination; sometimes painful to read. This book offered me a different array of information and answers in 2010 than it did when I first read it 30 years ago. Its content has held up well, though I am sure some younger folks will be baffled at the author's behavior in the 1970's. We were all like that to some extent at that time.
Kitaxe
I threw this book in the circular file after reading it. I can't believe that some book publisher would even bother to print this book. I feel that I have been fleeced of $15.95. This was a "staff recommendation" at my local bookstore. Gag....Once again, I feel that the P.C. culture is promoting more lies, misinformation and garbage and calling it art.
Rosemary Daniell has led a tragic life which she portends is the result of a lineage born out of southern womanhood. As a native southerner, I was insulted. She may have been born in the South, but, basically, she has lived a so-called white trash existence which is not exclusively a southern phenomenon. Ms. Daniell has made about every bad choice women can make in their lives regarding relationships, honoring your self, motherhood, etc.
When she repeatedly claims that the Jimmy Carter family typifies southern culture and that Rosalynn Carter is an ideal of southern womanhood, I was further insulted.
Rosemary Daniell is a "victim" of too many drugs and too much dysfunctionality not her southern upbringing. Besides being sophomoric in reasoning and rambling in content, this book is not worthy of anyone's time or money. Don't buy it.
Rosemary Daniell's memoir of her life as a Southern woman is unlike any that exists in literature. Because she has told it like it really is. For those readers who are interested in the truth about women in the South--and women everywhere--this book is for you.

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