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by Margaret Coel

  • ISBN: 0806116021
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Margaret Coel
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Other formats: lrf doc mbr lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ of Oklahoma Pr; 1st edition (October 1, 1981)
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • FB2 size: 1988 kb
  • EPUB size: 1489 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 243
Download Chief Left Hand: Southern Arapaho (Civilization of the American Indian Series) fb2

She has written many books about the Arapaho and other native American people. Margaret Coel, the prolific author of the Wind River Reservation mystery series shows her history creds in this biography of Chief Left Hand.

She has written many books about the Arapaho and other native American people. She tells the story of a man looking to protect the people for whom is is responsible in the face of shattering change.

Chief Left Hand book. Chief Left Hand and the tribes of the Plains Indians were cruelly deceived for the want of westward expansion and profit. Chief Left Hand was one of the first of his people to acknowledge the inevitability of the white man’s presence on the plain, and thereafter to espouse a policy of adamant peacefulness -if not, finally, friendship-toward the newcomers. Chief Left Hand is not only a consuming story-popular history at its best-but an important work of original scholarship.

Chief Left Hand was one of the first of his people to acknowledge the inevitability of the white man’s presence on the plain, and thereafter to espouse a policy of adamant peacefulness -if not, finally, friendship-toward the newcomers. Chief Left Hand is not only a consuming story-popular history at its best-but an important work of original scholarship

Chief Left Hand was one of the first of his people to acknowledge the inevitability of the white man’s presence on the plain, and thereafter to espouse a policy of adamant peacefulness -if not, finally, friendship-toward the newcomers. Chief Left Hand is not only a consuming story-popular history at its best-but an important work of original scholarship

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series The Civilization of the American Indian Series . Books related to Chief Left Hand: Southern Arapaho.

series The Civilization of the American Indian Series Chief Left Hand was one of the first of his people to acknowledge the inevitability of the white man’s presence on the plain, and thereafter to espouse a policy of adamant peacefulness -if not, finally, friendship-toward the newcomers.

Southern Arapaho (Civilization of the American Indian Series). Published January 1988 by University of Oklahoma Press. In the early 1820s a Southern Arapaho woman gave birth to a male child who was destined to become a leader of his tribe during the most critical period of its history.

Chief Left Hand: Southern Arapaho. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1981. Hughes, Johnson Donald. American Indians in Colorado. Boulder, Colorado: Pruett Publishing Company, 1977. Hafen, Le Roy Reuben. The Indians of Colorado. Denver, Colorado: State Historical Society of Colorado, 1952. Marsh, Charles S. The Utes of Colorado – People of the Shining Mountains.

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Recounts the life of the Arapaho chief, diplomat, and linguist, describes the experiences of his tribe during the nineteenth century, and clears up misconceptions about the Sand Creek massacre
Reviews about Chief Left Hand: Southern Arapaho (Civilization of the American Indian Series) (7):
Gom
I originally bought this book as a reference for my own purposes, but as I jumped around looking for the salient information my curiosity was piqued. Before I knew it the trap had been sprung. The author takes what could be some very dull history and brings it alive. Not only does she flesh out Left Hand into a real person, she also tells the tale of the Minister turned soldier John Chivington. These and many of the other historical characters come to life and the history book becomes a tale of hope and diplomacy, destroyed by the ambition and avarice of a few people. In search for glory and possible political power Chivington and Evans are exposed for who and what they were. Left Hand and Black Kettle are shown to be the leaders who could have brought about peace between the cultures, if not for the horror of Sand Creek. If you love the west and the history or the westward expansion then this is a book you need to have in your library.
Urtte
An interesting book, well written, obviously well researched. And very sad. A further illumination of what we've known since the 60s: the "Plains Wars" were entirely of the making of the white people who invaded and repeatedly stole the land of the people already living there, the Plains tribes. Not all the tribes were war-like, as travelers noted as early as Lewis and Clark and earlier, but it is clear that the Southern Arapaho were clearly the subjects of genocide by some of the white invaders. As this book makes clear, this was a very preventable tragedy. The book also demonstrates the old saying "the more things change, the more they stay the same."
Togor
This book is excellently written and I thought it painted an excellent picture of a time (mostly pre-Civil War America) and a people (the Arapaho) I didn't know much about.

I don't believe in downgrading a book's rating for things not related to the actual writing, but I was surprised when the actual text of the book ended when it was only 68% complete. The final third of the book is footnotes, bibliography, etc. That material should've been relegated to a web link.
Vrion
This book does the remarkable job of telling history while maintaining an easy, story-telling style. It judiciously uses facts but doesn't cram them into an endless series that often, in history books, leads to a density that makes one feel she or he is plodding through the material.

It is also a detective work, as Coel is trying to establish that Left Hand did die at Sand Creek. She lays out her argument well, but so do others who think that he did not perish there.

All said, I enjoyed this book very much. I especially liked how I got a sense of pioneer Denver, the day to day interactions of whites and Indians around Denver, and the continual struggle of many chiefs for peace that the white powers that be did not want to give them.
Dddasuk
This is thoroughly-researched biography of a remarkable peace loving man who tried time after time to make peace. He spoke English fluently so he understood what was happening with the settlers and gold seekers coming by the hundreds into his homeland. Peace was impossible and the losses were tragic. You'll find it hard to feel anything but sorrow for a nearly lost people. Coel is a long-time resident of Colorado. Her family has been there for generations. She has written many books about the Arapaho and other native American people. A very good "read".
Windforge
Excellent book. Entertaining, informative and well written by the wonderful writer Margaret Coel!
Halloween
Margaret Coel, the prolific author of the Wind River Reservation mystery series shows her history creds in this biography of Chief Left Hand. Many of her mysteries have a link to history and this work shows she does her homework and is good at it. It is an interesting look at the Anglo/Indian relationships on the high plains during the mid nineteenth century. Her research is thorough and impeccable. She tells the story of a man looking to protect the people for whom is is responsible in the face of shattering change. Her use of newspaper and personal accounts as well as government reports to bring the story to life. It is a tragedy that is a synecdoche for the entire western relationship, and she reports what happened and lets the chips fall where they may. A great read.
I have lived in Boulder for many years and we are always talking about Chief Niwot, so it is good to have some real, live information about the man, himself! Margaret Coel's careful research concerning Chief Niwot and his Arapaho Tribe and the coming of the white settlers results in one of the most even-handed explanations I have yet read regarding the demise of the Native American way of life.

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