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by Gary Jonathan Bass

  • ISBN: 069104922X
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Gary Jonathan Bass
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Other formats: lrf lit azw lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (August 20, 2000)
  • Pages: 368 pages
  • FB2 size: 1451 kb
  • EPUB size: 1467 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 646
Download Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals fb2

This study of the politics of war crimes tribunals discovers past cases that almost nobody had examined and covers in a. .

This study of the politics of war crimes tribunals discovers past cases that almost nobody had examined and covers in a lucid and provocative way more familiar recent examples. It is the best book on the subject, a humane plea for justice as the only alternative to unacceptable oblivion or vengeance, and a worthy addition to the company of brilliant first books. -Stanley Hoffmann, Harvard University.

Series: Princeton Studies in International History and Politics. In this book, Gary Bass offers an unprecedented look at the politics behind international war crimes tribunals, combining analysis with investigative reporting and a broad historical perspective. Bass explains that bringing war criminals to justice can be a military ordeal, a source of endless legal frustration, as well as a diplomatic nightmare.

In this book, Gary Bass offers an unprecedented look at the politics behind international war crimes tribunals, combining analysis with .

In this book, Gary Bass offers an unprecedented look at the politics behind international war crimes tribunals, combining analysis with investigative reporting and a broad historical perspective. Lists with This Book. Powerful International Non-Fiction.

In this book, Gary Bass offers an unprecedented look at the politics behind international war crimes tribunals . Bass concludes that despite the obstacles, legalistic justice for war criminals is nonetheless worth pursuing. His arguments will interest anyone concerned about human rights and the pursuit of idealism in international politics.

Bass, Gary Jonathan, 1969-. Princeton University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on May 1, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Gary Jonathan Bass argues that war crimes tribunals, though tugged in various directions by the . This study of the politics of war crimes tribunals discovers past cases that almost nobody had examined and covers in a lucid and provocative way more familiar recent examples.

Gary Jonathan Bass argues that war crimes tribunals, though tugged in various directions by the political forces of 'realism' and 'idealism' are in fact best understood not by grand sweeping models of political behavior but by a clear-headed investigation of the conditions under which they arise and proceed. -Joshua Sanborn, Journal of Slavic Military Studies.

Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000. Gary Bass has not only taken Jackson's phrase for the title of his book, he has also very clearly considered Jackson's meaning.

com User, September 7, 2007.

In this book, Gary Bass offers an unprecedented look at the politics behind international war crimes tribunals, combining analysis with investigative . Gary Jonathan Bass argues that war crimes tribunals, though tugged in various directions by the political forces of 'realism' and 'idealism' are in fact best understood not by grand sweeping models of political behavior but by a clear-headed investigation of the conditions under which they arise and proceed.

In this book, Gary Bass offers an unprecedented look at the politics . Gary Jonathan Bass is Assistant Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. -Joshua Sanborn, Journal of Slavic Military Studies "This excellent book.

International justice has become a crucial part of the ongoing political debates about the future of shattered societies like Bosnia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Cambodia, and Chile. Why do our governments sometimes display such striking idealism in the face of war crimes and atrocities abroad, and at other times cynically abandon the pursuit of international justice altogether? Why today does justice seem so slow to come for war crimes victims in the Balkans? In this book, Gary Bass offers an unprecedented look at the politics behind international war crimes tribunals, combining analysis with investigative reporting and a broad historical perspective. The Nuremberg trials powerfully demonstrated how effective war crimes tribunals can be. But there have been many other important tribunals that have not been as successful, and which have been largely left out of today's debates about international justice. This timely book brings them in, using primary documents to examine the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars, World War I, the Armenian genocide, World War II, and the recent wars in the former Yugoslavia.

Bass explains that bringing war criminals to justice can be a military ordeal, a source of endless legal frustration, as well as a diplomatic nightmare. The book takes readers behind the scenes to see vividly how leaders like David Lloyd George, Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt, and Bill Clinton have wrestled with these agonizing moral dilemmas. The book asks how law and international politics interact, and how power can be made to serve the cause of justice.

Bass brings new archival research to bear on such events as the prosecution of the Armenian genocide, presenting surprising episodes that add to the historical record. His sections on the former Yugoslavia tell--with important new discoveries--the secret story of the politicking behind the prosecution of war crimes in Bosnia, drawing on interviews with senior White House officials, key diplomats, and chief prosecutors at the war crimes tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Bass concludes that despite the obstacles, legalistic justice for war criminals is nonetheless worth pursuing. His arguments will interest anyone concerned about human rights and the pursuit of idealism in international politics.


Reviews about Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals (7):
Yozshubei
This book is thoroughly researched and footnoted and very well written. It culminates in a balanced account of the development of the International War Crimes Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and exposes the role of Western nations in supporting- and in some cases, obstructing the tribunal's work. Bass' thesis is that Western nations value human rights and the rule of law,- but not more than the lives of their own soldiers - thus accounting for the sporadic Western support for War Crimes tribunals. This is provocative book which has many insights into the complexities of international organizations, human rights, and diplomacy.
Adoraris
The book is very dense and it is essential that the reader is very aware of the wealth of information. But the great merit of the work is precisely the rich demonstration of why the law should always be chosen instead of violence and revenge. Another positive peculiarity of the book is to demonstrate the point of view of several states regarding the defendants of war crimes, proving that the solutions are often the "tailoring" of heterogeneous interests of several winners of a war.
Ballardana
very good !
Lynnak
Okay, purchased it for class...
Arar
Excellent!
Granijurus
"Stay the Hand of Vengeance" is a set of five case studies of how victorious Western societies dealt with enemy leaders who had set the world or part of it aflame: Napoleon in 1815, German militarists in 1919-20, Ottoman officers and politicians in 1919-20, Nazi leaders in 1945-46 and Serbian nationalists in 1996-2002. The book was exceedingly informative and it is hard to dispute its central arguments.

The most interesting parts of the book are the stories of the World War I tribunals, and that of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, which unlike the others is actually told in three chapters. In World War I the victorious Allies directed the defeated Central Powers to put war criminals on trial in their own courts, which usually didn't work so well. Still, one Ottoman officer was actually hanged in 1919 for abusing British prisoners, but his funeral was a huge boost to the growing nationalist movement of Kemal Ataturk, which eventually took enough British hostages to force an exchange and end the trials. The experience was so demoralizing to the British that their initial instinct was to simply shoot the top Nazis upon their surrender 26 years later. That they did not can mostly be attributed to Henry Stimson, the American Secretary of War who argued (almost alone at times) for real trials with legal protections for the accused. Stimson's views eventually won out, producing Nuremberg, the most successful international tribunal of all time.

The ICTY chapters however are clearly the most fascinating in the book. Bass argues that even a major democratic power is always more interested in punishing offenses against itself or its own citizens than that against more numerous third-party victims in the war, but in Bosnia in the 1990s there were virtually no Western victims. This was one reason that initially there wasn't a whole lot of support for the ICTY, but as time passed and the SFOR occupation of Bosnia brought Western troops into contact with more and more war criminals, it became harder to justify not arresting them. The ICTY's budget and prestige grew accordingly until finally in early 2001 the recently dethroned Slobodan Milosevic, primary author of the Balkan Wars, was handed over, allowing the book to end on a note of sincere optimism.

Bass finished his book fifteen years ago and I would love to read his commentary on, for example, the Meron-Harhoff controversy over the evidentiary standard for command responsibility, or the ICC. The latter is at best a mixed success, as any war criminal allied to a permanent Security Council member cannot be charged there. Ad hoc and permanent tribunals are mostly necessary because of the ethnic and religious bloodletting that has followed the end of the Cold War and therefore cannot be plausibly argued to DETER war crimes. Still, the ICTY and the ICC represent victories for the idea that justice is achieved in a courtroom from the sifting of the facts and the application of law, not from the barrel of a gun. Five stars.
Brariel
Good research and journalism, but terribly repetitive. Same lines are repeated so many times that the book turns into a summary of itself. Was the author just trying to fill up a page limit?
The man has courage to deal with these issues read the book

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