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by A. Pettifor

  • ISBN: 0230007848
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: A. Pettifor
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Other formats: txt lrf mbr docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2006 edition (October 2, 2006)
  • Pages: 190 pages
  • FB2 size: 1624 kb
  • EPUB size: 1484 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 917
Download The Coming First World Debt Crisis fb2

In this book Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the first world or OECD countries

In this book Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the first world or OECD countries. She traces the history and roots of where the current international debt crisis comes from-economic liberalization-and the restructuring of the international financial architecture in the early 1970s. The book goes on to explore the implications of high international indebtedness for governments.

Ann Pettifor has been synonymous with the issue of cancelling third world debt. In this book, written in 2005 and published in September, 2006, she turned her attention from the debt crises of low-income countries to the ballooning debts of the rich, or ‘first world’ countries. The book highlighted threats posed by high levels of debt owed to Anglo-American governments, corporations, households and individuals, and predicted that a debt-deflationary crisis loomed. The book was largely ignored at the time of publication, but later came to be acknowledged as prescient.

In this book, Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the 'first world' or OECD countries, looking at the history, politics and ethics of the coming debt crisis and exploring the implications of high international.

In this book, Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the 'first world' or OECD countries, looking at the history, politics and ethics of the coming debt crisis and exploring the implications of high international indebtedness for governments, corporations, households, individuals an. It seems that you're in Russian Federation. We have a dedicated site for Russian Federation.

Автор: Pettifor, Ann Название: Coming first world debt crisis Издательство: Springer .

Поставляется из: Германии Описание: In this book, Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the & world& or OECD countries, looking at the history, politics and ethics of the coming debt crisis and exploring the implications of high international indebtedness for governments, corporations, households, individuals and the ecosystem.

In this book Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the first world or OECD countries

In this book Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the first world or OECD countries. The book goes on to explore the implications of high international In this book Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the first world or OECD countries.

Author: The Coming First World Debt Crisis ('06) GND ('08) The Production of Money ('17) The Case for the Green New Deal . Следующий твит пользователя. Ann Pettifor‏ ettifor 2 янв. Читать Читать ettifor.

Author: The Coming First World Debt Crisis ('06) GND ('08) The Production of Money ('17) The Case for the Green New Deal, Sept 2019. Hannah Arendt Prize ('18). Читаю Вы читаете ettifor.

Электронная книга "The Coming First World Debt Crisis", A. Pettifor

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Ann Pettifor (born February 1947) is a British economist who advises governments and organisations. She has published several books. Her work focuses on the global financial system, sovereign debt restructuring, international finance and sustainable. Her work focuses on the global financial system, sovereign debt restructuring, international finance and sustainable development. Pettifor is best known for correctly predicting the financial crisis of 2007–08. She was one of the leaders of the Jubilee 2000 debt cancellation campaign.

Ann Pettifor was a debt campaigner with the Jubilee 2000 movement, and having spent years looking at developing .

Ann Pettifor was a debt campaigner with the Jubilee 2000 movement, and having spent years looking at developing world debts, turned to the overlooked issue of rich country debts. She predicts a financial crisis that turns into a sovereign debt crisis, and then into a crisis for democracy itself, with a prescience that is almost heart-breaking. Along the way there are some very useful notes on how banks create money – see the Positive Money campaign.

A financial crisis under debt-deflationary conditions will be catastrophic for many debtors.

In this book, Ann Pettifor examines the issues of debt affecting the 'first world' or OECD countries, looking at the history, politics and ethics of the coming debt crisis and exploring the implications of high international indebtedness for governments, corporations, households, individuals and the ecosystem.
Reviews about The Coming First World Debt Crisis (6):
Kifer
I bought this book several years ago and now I can't find it. Sure enough, Amazon has it. I had to get it out of England back them. I'll replace it when it becomes available for Kindle.
I heard Pettifor interviewed on PBS not long after her book was published and immediately bought it. This book and a few others prepared me for the crash of '08. They have also prepared me psychologically for a worst possible case scenario. Should that come about, blaming any one or more persons or institutions will be a waste of mental and emotional energy.
Another great book is James Rickard's Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis. Currency wars and debt, both sovereign and private, are inextricably intertwined; they are spinning-up with the specter of producing the perfect global financial storm. Both books should be required reading for high school seniors and college freshman. While both might be classed as products of academia, Rickards has had his feet on the ground for decades. I can't remember Pettifor's background.
A reading of these two books along with two or three that Andrew Bacevich has authored (e.g. The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism) imbues the reader with pertinent knowledge that 99.999 percent of bankers and politicians don't have but need. Reading and passing a legitimate quiz on the subject matter should be required as a condition to hold office and be banker, financial advisor, accountant or lawyer and probably some other professions.
Blacknight
I bought this book after seeing Pettifor on TV, being credited for predicting the current (2007-onward) credit crises. I guess it serves me right that I did not research who the author was. I thought the book was going to be about economics, or that it would throw some light on the nature and extent of the current crisis. Instead, it is a diatribe from someone who seems to be Marxist-Christian-ecologist.

I did find it interesting that modern Marxists are now speaking with praise of certain classes of businessmen, and even extolling their profit-making. However, this praise is reserved only for those who make "real" things. It is a vague term that is an expansion of the Marxist theory of value, updated to include knowledge work...except financial intermediation.

The book is a rant about modern "usury". I made it into about 30 pages but was falling asleep. So, I've listed my copy on Amazon. I'm writing this review because I don't want anyone buying it with the wrong impression.

The book would be a valuable addition to any college student preparing a paper where he would like to argue about the evils of "globalization", how bankers are usurers who are driving us to exhaust the planets resources, or how the gold standard was like a corset. For everyone else, it's pretty much useless.
Samugul
I read the book before I read the reviews here. After I read the book, I thought to myself that the author had some interesting ideas. Not many people before 2007 thought so negatively about bankers : before the crisis, bankers were well-respected people who were regarded as upright, intelligent and deservedly rich. Young graduates rushed to join banks not only for the money but the prestige. Now we know how wrong we all were. The banks abused the privilege (of being able to create money from thin air) given to them, chased short-term profits that resulted in the collapse of the system, dragging down innocent people with them. If anything, the book should have served as a warning to policy makers before 2007 that bankers should be reined in. I disagree with the other reader who called the author Marxist and other names. The facts support her views. Banks serve an important function in a capitalist society, but they have to be kept under a leash, otherwise they will do damage to the society. Credit creation is a two-way sword, we need it for economic growth, but if it is given too loosely, it will destroy the system. This is not Marxist speak, this is pragmatism.
Longitude Temporary
In this book published in 2006 Ann Pettifor put forward a detailed scenario in which excessive debt in the developed world caused a serious economic crisis. The 2008 financial crisis proceeded exactly as she suggested it would. Pettifor does an excellent job of explaining how the basic financial structure of our society was undermined in the lead up to our most recent crisis. I have read fairly extensively on economics, and this book contains by far the best explanation of what money is and how it works that I have encountered. Pettifor makes a case for her own solutions to the problems leading up to the crisis, which are mostly radically outside of the mainstream options being considered. Of course the idea of a first world financial collapse was outside of the mainstream when the book was published.

Ultimately the presentation of the flaws in our system that led to the crisis is easily separated from the critique/solutions that Pettifor presents. Pettifor's ideological bent isn't as cut and dry as other reviewers have suggested, people ranging from marxists to libertarians will find suggestions they agree with and others they don't. Even if you aren't amenable to any of the solutions proposed in the book it does such a phenomenal job of outlining the problem that, regardless of your ideological bent, it is well worth your time. If you are looking for an incisive analysis of the underlying flaws that have lately plagued our economy this is the book for you.

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