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by Andrew Ross

  • ISBN: 0465071449
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Andrew Ross
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Other formats: rtf mobi azw txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (December 5, 2002)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • FB2 size: 1981 kb
  • EPUB size: 1479 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 300
Download No-collar: The Hidden Cost Of The Humane Workplace fb2

No-collar: The Hidden Cost Of The Humane Workplace.

No-collar: The Hidden Cost Of The Humane Workplace. A revealing look at New Economy workplaces.

No-Collar is the only close study of New Economy workplaces in their heyday Yet for every apparent benefit, there appeared to be a hidden cost: 70-hour workweeks, a lack of managerial protection, an oppressive shouldering of risk b. .

No-Collar is the only close study of New Economy workplaces in their heyday. Andrew Ross, a renowned writer and scholar of American intellectual and social life, spent eighteen months deep inside Silicon Alley in residence at two prominent New Economy companies, Razorfish and 360hiphop, and interviewed a wide range of industry employees in other cities to write this remarkable book. Yet for every apparent benefit, there appeared to be a hidden cost: 70-hour workweeks, a lack of managerial protection, an oppressive shouldering of risk by employees, an illusory sense of power sharing, and no end of emotional churning.

No-Collar: the Humane Workplace and Its Hidden Costs. 1592131506 (ISBN13: 9781592131501).

While the Internet bubble has burst, the New Economy that the Internet produced. No-Collar: the Humane Workplace and Its Hidden Costs.

No-Collar is the first book to place the much-feted New Economy workplace in the context of.

From Horatio Alger to the Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, Americans have extolled the virtues of hard work as a source of meaning and identity as well as livelihood. With his characteristic mix of laser-sharp analysis and deft storytelling, Ross asks: How humane can, or should, a workplace be? In documenting the quixotic life of these neo-bohemian workplaces, No-Collar records a unique moment in American history and reveals what the landscape of work will look like for decades to come.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2005, Spela Trefalt and others published Andrew Ross: No-Collar: The Humane Workplace . Exposure to high noise levels in the workplace can cause hearing loss and affect worker productivity and compensation costs

Exposure to high noise levels in the workplace can cause hearing loss and affect worker productivity and compensation costs. This document describes case studies in which noise controls were implemented that reduced worker noise exposure.

Two further books were based on field work with employees: No-Collar: The Humane Workplace and Its Hidden Costs, about .

Two further books were based on field work with employees: No-Collar: The Humane Workplace and Its Hidden Costs, about employees in Internet companies during the New Economy boom and bust, and Fast Boat to China: Corporate Flight and the Consequences of Free Trade, about skilled Chinese employees of foreign firms in Shanghai and other Yangtze Delta cities. The latter book, written on the ground in China, is a frank alternative to Thomas Friedman's pro-outsourcing views on corporate globalisation.

The new work environment promised greater flexibility, creative challenges, and less reliance on a rigid organizational hierarchy—but not without costs

The new work environment promised greater flexibility, creative challenges, and less reliance on a rigid organizational hierarchy—but not without costs. The frenzy of the dot-com era wrought significant changes in the American workplace. The new work environment promised greater flexibility, creative challenges, and less reliance on a rigid organizational hierarchy—but not without costs.

No-Collar: The Humane Workplace and its Hidden Costs (Basic Books, 2002). The Celebration Chronicles: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Property Value in Disney's New Town (Ballantine, 1999). Real Love: In Pursuit of Cultural Justice (NYU Press, 1998).

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No-Collar is the first book to place the much-feted New Economy workplace in the context of industrial history and the struggle to win a humane work environment. From Horatio Alger to the Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, Americans have extolled the virtues of hard work as a source of meaning and identity as well as livelihood. Drawing on his yearlong study of two Silicon Alley companies, as well as on interviews with a range of employees in other Internet industries, Andrew Ross offers a dramatic report on how the self-directed "no-collar" life stacks up against earlier work utopias.Though urban knowledge workers enjoyed unprecedented autonomy and bargaining power, and their bohemian artisan style evoked a pre-industrial craft ethos, the volatile economy exposed even the rank-and-file to 24/7 schedules, emotional churning, and the kinds of pressure typically borne only by senior managers. With his characteristic mix of laser-sharp analysis and deft storytelling, Ross asks: How humane can, or should, a workplace be? In documenting the quixotic life of these neo-bohemian workplaces, No-Collar records a unique moment in American history and reveals what the landscape of work will look like for decades to come.
Reviews about No-collar: The Hidden Cost Of The Humane Workplace (6):
BlackHaze
One of the best, most accessible books of modern sociology. Ross writes masterfully, pithily, with great humanity, about the working lives and sociological changes of the American supersystem. Finding the ugly underbelly to the supposed workplace "revolution" highlights the value of the intense ethnographic approach, but the findings of actual observation are buttressed by Ross's brilliant wider explorations of the complex backdrop of corporate machinations."No-Collar" has proven to be disturbingly prescient in its sober explication of the dismal future that work will bring to the freshly-scrubbed Montessori college graduates who are churned out by the academic industrial complex.
Enduring question: how did Ross, who combines the verve of journalism with the command of a genuine writer, get involved with the Sokal hoax? Ross writes with none of the socio-schlock of "performative" or "generative" bafflegab that bedevils the modern incarnation of sociology, more along the clear lines of Barbara Ehrenreich, but his name is all over that sad hoodwink.
Dukinos
An entertaining and informative read about a time that will be remembered right along side tulip mania. No Collar differs from many business books because it gives valuable insights through the use of the powerful medium of story telling. The writer spent a good deal of time inside the company he focuses on and gives a compelling first hand account.
The lessons and ideas to be learned from this book are not spelled out like in many management books. The reader must read between the lines and come to his/her own conclusions.
One essential lesson to be learned from this account of a company during the inernet explosion and subsequent implosion is the necessity of corporate values and a vision.(built to last) While there is nothing wrong with striving to construct a workplace utopia, clear goals and direction are essential for any company. These ideas are not mutually exclusive from optimum working conditions and do not have to come at the expense of creativity.
Ishnjurus
It doesn't appear that the reader from Los Angeles read this particular book; it seems he/she simply took this space as an opportunity to rant about Andrew Ross and other vaguely related issues. Ross's book is a nuanced look at the peculiar culture of the new media workplace, just as the golden years began to fade. Considering that Ross was not actually an employee of Razorfish, the main company in his case study, his perspective is surprisingly sensitive. After spending the dot-com golden years in San Francisco and Silicon Valley, I was prepared to scoff at an outsider's interpretation of what the new media workplace was like, and how it felt to be an employee of that workplace. I was further prepared to roll my eyes at his choice of exploring New York's new media world rather than making the trip to the heart of it all, the San Francisco Bay Area. But in the end I was impressed: he explains his reasons for choosing New York, and they make sense. And he hits the nail on the head in terms of what was most odd and most interesting--as well as most consequential--about the feel-good, creative, ambitious new media work environment. The book grows significantly more "readable" after the first few chapters give way to more anecdotal scene-setting and conversations with Razorfish employees.
Yar
An excellent book capturing the dilemmas of working in the creative economy. We can all exalt it but we should also think about the "cost" of the imperative to be innovative, always-on, and super-networked for the purpose of a company (not yours).
allegro
No-Collar is excellent. As someone who worked in a dot.com during the 90s boom, I can really appreciate the in-depth analysis that Ross offers. Most people think that my job had to do with free massages and pinball machines, but Ross dispels the myth that work can be play. While my job was a lot of fun at times, Ross hits the nail on the head when he discusses the "hidden costs" involved. I also liked the way this book puts the dot.com world and its unique management style in the larger context of late 20th century labor issues.
Ygglune
If you've worked in the new technology world in the 90s you should read this book. It will help you understand what happened and why you now realize your job wasn't all that.

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