» » The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving

Download The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving fb2

by Leigh Gallagher

  • ISBN: 1591846978
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Leigh Gallagher
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Other formats: rtf doc docx lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Portfolio; Reprint edition (June 24, 2014)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • FB2 size: 1440 kb
  • EPUB size: 1994 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 472
Download The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving fb2

The end of Suburbia is timely and important. Or how most of us will live in a world where oil is expensive? Leigh Gallagher's crisp, entertaining, and fact-filled new book answers these questions and many more.

The end of Suburbia is timely and important. We should hope it is prophetic, because Leigh Gallagher shows suburbs as we know them are unsafe for our species. Eric Klinenberg, Professor of Sociology at New York University and author of Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone. Bethany McLean, coauthor, The Smartest Guys in the Room and All the Devils are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis.

Gallagher sees a trend, a reverse of what went on during the 1950s and 60s.

The book traces that people and wealth are moving into cities especially the core and the inner suburbs built before 1940 and the poverty rate while still lower in the suburbs than the city is growing faster than the cities since the crash. For the first time in a hundred years population is reversing the tide out of the city to the suburbs and now the suburbanites are starting to move back to the city or inner suburbs. Gallagher sees a trend, a reverse of what went on during the 1950s and 60s.

I’m here for the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU), the annual gathering of the nation’s leading anti-sprawl movement.

But there is no single American Dream anymore. For nearly 70 years, the suburbs were as American as apple pie. As the middle class ballooned and single-family homes and cars became more affordable, we flocked to pre-fabricated communities in the suburbs, a place where open air and solitude offered a retreat from our dense, polluted cities. Before long, success became synonymous with a private home in a bedroom community complete with a yard, a two-car garage and a commute to the office, and subdivisions quickly blanketed our landscape. But in recent years things have started to change.

Автор: Gallagher Leigh Название: The End of the Suburbs: Where the . But there is no single American Dream anymore This book tells the story behind Airbnb in all its forms. This book tells the story behind Airbnb in all its forms.

Mobile version (beta). The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving. Download (epub, . 8 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Gallagher, Leigh Verfasser (DE-588)105593216X. Publication, Distribution, et. New York. Download DOC book format.

In addition, she co-chairs Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Summit.

“The government in the past created one American Dream at the expense of almost all others: the dream of a house, a lawn, a picket fence, two children, and a car. But there is no single American Dream anymore.”For nearly 70 years, the suburbs were as American as apple pie. As the middle class ballooned and single-family homes and cars became more affordable, we flocked to pre-fabricated communities in the suburbs, a place where open air and solitude offered a retreat from our dense, polluted cities. Before long, success became synonymous with a private home in a bedroom community complete with a yard, a two-car garage and a commute to the office, and subdivisions quickly blanketed our landscape.But in recent years things have started to change. An epic housing crisis revealed existing problems with this unique pattern of development, while the steady pull of long-simmering economic, societal and demographic forces has culminated in a Perfect Storm that has led to a profound shift in the way we desire to live.In The End of the Suburbs journalist Leigh Gallagher traces the rise and fall of American suburbia from the stately railroad suburbs that sprung up outside American cities in the 19th and early 20th centuries to current-day sprawling exurbs where residents spend as much as four hours each day commuting. Along the way she shows why suburbia was unsustainable from the start and explores the hundreds of new, alternative communities that are springing up around the country and promise to reshape our way of life for the better.Not all suburbs are going to vanish, of course, but Gallagher’s research and reporting show the trends are undeniable. Consider some of the forces at work:    • The nuclear family is no more: Our marriage and birth rates are steadily declining, while the single-person households are on the rise. Thus, the good schools and family-friendly lifestyle the suburbs promised are increasingly unnecessary.   • We want out of our cars: As the price of oil continues to rise, the hours long commutes forced on us by sprawl have become unaffordable for many. Meanwhile, today’s younger generation has expressed a perplexing indifference toward cars and driving. Both shifts have fueled demand for denser, pedestrian-friendly communities.   • Cities are booming. Once abandoned by the wealthy, cities are experiencing a renaissance, especially among younger generations and families with young children. At the same time, suburbs across the country have had to confront never-before-seen rates of poverty and crime.Blending powerful data with vivid on the ground reporting, Gallagher introduces us to a fascinating cast of characters, including the charismatic leader of the anti-sprawl movement; a mild-mannered Minnesotan who quit his job to convince the world that the suburbs are a financial Ponzi scheme; and the disaffected residents of suburbia, like the teacher whose punishing commute entailed leaving home at 4 a.m. and sleeping under her desk in her classroom.Along the way, she explains why understanding the shifts taking place is imperative to any discussion about the future of our housing landscape and of our society itself—and why that future will bring us stronger, healthier, happier and more diverse communities for everyone.
Reviews about The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving (7):
Khiceog
A very interesting book. It prompts the reader to critically think about the different stories that are told--on many occasions I found myself pausing and thinking how the scenario suggested has played out, or may play out, in my own community. I thought a lot about what I, as an American, want from the house I just bought and whether or not Ms. Gallagher had correctly judged my generation's desires from my own perspective. That being said, Ms. Gallagher is a resident of the country's most urban environment and may not necessarily be well placed to pass judgement on the types of communities she has clearly personally rejected as "good."

The most interesting parts were the discussion how we got here and some of the challenges presented for the future by the current housing stock. The introduction to New Urbanism was also very interesting, as I'm familiar with, but could never name these distinct communities.

I think the discussion around future drivers of change in housing demand lacked much support, however. We get a massive amount of detail around the creation of suburban communities thanks to GM-inspired futurism, how they no longer encourage "neighborliness" because there are less children around, and how their street designs discourage human contact while encouraging traffic accidents etc etc. But besides these "negative" innate characteristics of suburban communities (which are likely considered positives when viewed differently by many of the residents of these homes), the author doesn't really suggest more than one reason why everyone will be abandoning them which she strongly suggests will happen.

That one reason? Gas prices.

This seems like an massive over-simplification. There was no discussion of the major technological changes happening to automobiles a this very moment. Gas prices are likely to be much less important to consumers 20 years from now than they are today. Even more critically, the author does not mention the massive technological revolution that has changed how many, many people work. The requirement to actually go and sit in a physical office day in and day out is on the decline in most every industry. Cheap telephony and the rise of the internet enable people to stay in communication wherever they are and fewer and fewer people are making the trek into the office each day. Additionally, many of these offices are no longer in the urban core as companies move closer to where their employees live. This will expand, rather than contract, some people's choices on housing. I was really quite surprised at the omission. Sometimes key data or perspectives appear to be left out because they would conflict with the author's overall message and personal opinion.

Finally, I was disappointed that there was no discussion on what's next for suburbs other than to suggest that farther flung ones will be abandoned and will turn into ghettoes. This is not terribly helpful. If the author believes that the suburbs do not provide the housing stock people of the future will want, I'd love to hear ways people have for transforming the already built environment into something that WILL be what people want. There is limited amounts of land around metropolitan areas and most of it has been developed. And much of it is suburban housing stock. These homes cannot be just discarded if people want to avoid all this driving, as the author suggests they do. It is likewise not possible to simply bulldoze them and re-zone the land. Homes in these communities will remain desirable because of where they are located particularly in pricey coastal cities, even if the community's character is not people would design today. So what can we do to revitalize these places for the future Ms. Gallagher?

I recommend this--it seems to have some missing pieces--but it made me think a lot before I would agree or disagree with each premise proffered. That is the sign of a good book.
Cheber
This book is a quick read, and hits all the major points of its thesis very well. Proofreading could have been better, though. A sprinkling of misspelled words, a scattering of weird sentence constructions. Did any actual human check this text?

The book sometimes reads as advice and explanations to housing developers, sometimes as a study of historical forces and sociological trends. It is a good overview for the casual reader who is interested in our changing society and the shift that happened after the housing meltdown.

— from Mrs. CyberDad
Burilar
Really enjoyed this book. Helped that the author lived minutes from where I grew up so I was very familiar with her tome. Unfortunately I am now living in the exurbs as she describes but at least I know I'm not as alone in this as I thought I was. Hopefully she will write another book about how to escape this type of living that I feel trapped in. She was so right with so many statements that my husband has told me were in my mind. I'm leaving this type of life, with or without him. Exurbs of nothing lead to nothing and to me are pointless. Still wondering why I wasted a fortune going to a top university to marry and end up here. DH isn't from here. This happened by fluke.
Vareyma
I thought I was pretty knowledgeable about this topic since I'm a real estate agent focused on urban properties and I see the movement of people from the suburbs into the city, but there was a lot of information in this book that I didn't know. It was very readable and well researched, it's like reading a New York Times feature article -- very enjoyable and interesting!
Gosar
The writer makes market trends and demographics shifts entertaining to read. What more could you ask for? I have lived in rural and urban areas, but I really thought I knew something about suburban life since it's so prominent in pop culture. Oh, boy, there's a lot I didn't understand about the suburban experience and how it's changing! I gulped this book down and am recommending it to everyone I know involved in policy. There's a counterintuitive epiphany on every page. Read it on the Kindle and might buy it in paperback to let people borrow it.

Related to The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving fb2 books: