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by Rosalie Riegle Troester

  • ISBN: 1566390591
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Rosalie Riegle Troester
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Other formats: azw lrf mobi docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Temple University Press (September 29, 1993)
  • Pages: 597 pages
  • FB2 size: 1463 kb
  • EPUB size: 1914 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 832
Download Voices From the Catholic Worker fb2

The intellectual ferment at the Catholic Worker comes across in this book, which includes views ranging from . Aine, one of the house coordinaters, loaned me her copy of Voices from the Catholic Worker to read.

The intellectual ferment at the Catholic Worker comes across in this book, which includes views ranging from those of prominent people to those of children. Catholic Workers are fiercely independent thinkers who take ideas seriously. Their roundtable discussions are not unlike those of the Transcendentalists at Boston and Brook Farm in the 1840s. An avid reader herself, she pointed out a couple in the book and directed my attention to a hand-written script in the first pages. To Mary and Pat {Murray}, True Catholic Worker "lifers" and an inspiration to me.

Voices From Catholic Worker book. In the sixtieth anniversary year of the Catholic Worker, Rosalie Riegle Troester reconfirms the diversity and commitment of a movement that applies basic Christianity to social problems.

Author note: Rosalie Riegle Troester is Professor of English at Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan. Founded in 1933 by Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin, the Catholic Worker has continued to apply the principles of voluntary poverty and nonviolence to changing social and political realities.

Troester, Rosalie Riegle (1993). Voices from the Catholic Worker. Temple University Press. Riegle, Rosalie G. (2003). Dorothy Day: Portraits by Those who Knew Her. Orbis Books. ISBN 978-1-56639-059-0. ISBN 978-1-57075-467-8. Hand, Stephen (2005). Catholic Voices in a World on Fire. ISBN 978-1-4116-5777-9. Douglass, James W. (2008).

Rosalie Riegle Books, Evanston, Illinois. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Page created – 13 October 2013. St. Kateri Catholic worker. Community organisation. Voices for Creative Nonviolence. Witness Against Torture.

Rosalie is an oral historian who taught English at Saginaw Valley University from 1969 to 2003

Rosalie is an oral historian who taught English at Saginaw Valley University from 1969 to 2003. The author of two books on the Catholic Worker movement, Voices from the Catholic Worker and Dorothy Day: Portraits by Those Who Knew Her, she raised four daughters and cofounded two Catholic Worker houses in Saginaw, Michigan.

It's full of interviews from people with many connections to the Catholic Worker movement and its first leaders, Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin. One of those interviews is with Michael Harrington, perhaps best known for his influential book The Other America which was instrumental in inspiring the War on Poverty in the 1960s. Harrington tells Troester about why he abandoned the Catholic church of his youth:. the immediate issue that caused me to leave the church,".

Voices from the Catholic Worker". Book by Rosalie Riegle Troester (p. 114), 1993. The Voices of Silence". Book by Andre Malraux, Doubleday, Part IV, Chapter VI, 1953.

An oral historian in the tradition of Studs Terkel, Rosalie Riegle has written books on the history of the Catholic Worker movement, the non-violence movement and women's history. We also talk about the organizational lessons of the AA movement and Douglas Rushkoff's terrific book, Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus. Episode (Rosalie Riegle interview on the Catholic Worker movement) by Dorothy's Place is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Seems a little quiet over here.

Rosalie Riegle Troester’s oral history of the Worker movement, Voices From the Catholic Worker, is an utterly singular contribution

Rosalie Riegle Troester’s oral history of the Worker movement, Voices From the Catholic Worker, is an utterly singular contribution. Troester’s method levels the playing field, making room for the full range of voices that constitute a decentralized movement made up of independent lay communities. Catholic Worker scholarship will never be the same.

This rich oral history weaves a tapestry of memories and experience from interviews, roundtable discussions, personal memoirs, and thorough research. In the sixtieth anniversary year of the Catholic Worker, Rosalie Riegle Troester reconfirms the diversity and commitment of a movement that applies basic Christianity to social problems.

Founded in 1933 by Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin, the Catholic Worker has continued to apply the principles of voluntary poverty and nonviolence to changing social and political realities. Over 200 interviews with Workers from all over the United States reveal how people came to this movement, how they were changed by it, and how they faced contradictions between the Catholic Worker philosophy and the call of contemporary life.

Vivid memoirs of Dorothy Day, Peter Maurin, and Ammon Hennacy are interwoven with accounts of involvement with labor unions, war resistance, and life on Catholic Worker farms. The author also addresses the Worker's relationship with the Catholic Church and with the movement's wrenching debates over abortion, homosexuality, and the role of women.


Reviews about Voices From the Catholic Worker (5):
Flas
The intellectual ferment at the Catholic Worker comes across in this book, which includes views ranging from those of prominent people to those of children. Catholic Workers are fiercely independent thinkers who take ideas seriously. Their roundtable discussions are not unlike those of the Transcendentalists at Boston and Brook Farm in the 1840s. But they don't live in ivory towers. They are in the front lines of the struggle for social justice. Practicing hands-on Christianity, they live with the broken people they serve, and have stories to tell that most people cannot even imagine! I especially liked the one about the Catholic Worker activist who was sentenced by a judge to do community service. I already do that, she replied, to the consternation of the judge.

This provocative book of practical philosophy covers the movement from every angle: why people join, why they leave, what they think about war and peace, usury and capitalism, going to jail for justice, community and family life, abortion, homosexuality, feminism, the Catholic church, and many other issues. No evasion of thorny issues here! There are insights from many Worker communities in the U.S. and Canada, plus interesting accounts of the history and personalities of the movement. A very lively and candid discussion! Catholic Workers try to live according to the Christian gospels; this book is a discussion of how they apply those gospel principles to the issues of today.
Qiahmagha
The intellectual ferment at the Catholic Worker comes across in this book, which includes views ranging from those of prominent people to those of children. Catholic Workers are fiercely independent thinkers who take ideas seriously. Their roundtable discussions are not unlike those of the Transcendentalists at Boston and Brook Farm in the 1840s. But they don't live in ivory towers. They are in the front lines of the struggle for social justice. Practicing hands-on Christianity, they live with the broken people they serve, and have stories to tell that most people cannot even imagine! I especially liked the one about the Catholic Worker activist who was sentenced by a judge to do community service. I already do that, she replied, to the consternation of the judge.

This provocative book of practical philosophy covers the movement from every angle: why people join, why they leave, what they think about war and peace, usury and capitalism, going to jail for justice, community and family life, abortion, homosexuality, feminism, the Catholic church, and many other issues. No evasion of thorny issues here! There are insights from many Worker communities in the U.S. and Canada, plus interesting accounts of the history and personalities of the movement. A very lively and candid discussion! Catholic Workers try to live according to the Christian gospels; this book is a discussion of how they apply those gospel principles to the issues of today.
Ddilonyne
Troester is only the editor of this book. The actual text is taken from interviews of Catholic Workers all over N America. Because of this, it's an all-encompassing book...with voices who are Catholic, Jewish, Athiest, Buddhist, and in-between...people who practice hospitality in different ways, running Shelters, Soup Kitchens, Farms, and also homes for kids...people with all sorts of different opinions and ages...and stories of all different sorts. No one person could possibly have written such an excellent book. Also, if you're hesitating about reading this book because you think it may be too Catholic, or too political, or too do-gooder, too conservative or too radical or what have you...then I suggest that there are so many voices in this book that this need not be a concern. Somewhere in this book there is a story of profound value for everyone.
Marad
Four months ago I started volunteering at a fairly new Catholic Worker house in Akron, OH. I knew virtually nothing about The Worker; of course, I'd heard of Dorothy Day and even stayed in a Worker house on a weekend retreat but never thought to inquire into its history and philosophies. A good friend asked me to help her out at the Casa de la Paz (the Akron House), to get me out of the full-time work/college grind. I agreed and fell in love with the folks I came in contact with. Quickly I sank deeper and deeper into the house's struggles and joys (mostly joys) and picked up on the philosophies behind the movement. Aine, one of the house coordinaters, loaned me her copy of Voices from the Catholic Worker to read. An avid reader herself, she pointed out a couple in the book and directed my attention to a hand-written script in the first pages. "To Mary and Pat {Murray}, True Catholic Worker "lifers" and an inspiration to me. Love, Rosalie" I delved into the book and learned of a truly blessed movement through the mouths and lives of the people that helped withstain it. Folks like the Murrays, the Zarrellas, and other common people whose lives were transformed forever. Troester weaves the memories of Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin and other prominent figures into a cohesive history that reads like a campfire conversation. Strangely intimate and familiar, one feels a friendship with the storytellers that delves the reader into the book and arrests his/her interest in the present. (My teapot screamed for minutes before I shook myself out of my reverie and answered its wail.) One of the best books I've read this year, it's a necessary read for those searching for a more intimate recount of the Catholic Worker history.
asAS
It's the small human touches that make connections that make a difference. Riegle has done an inspiring job of recording them in a book that's encouraging to read especially at a time when success is measured in mergers and Web billions.

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