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by Frances Stonor Saunders

  • ISBN: 156584596X
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Frances Stonor Saunders
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Other formats: txt lrf mobi doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The New Press (April 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 528 pages
  • FB2 size: 1844 kb
  • EPUB size: 1466 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 856
Download The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters fb2

Frances Stonor Saunders, an independent film producer and writer for the New Statesman, has now produced an authoritative modern history of the CIA and the Congress, as well as related organizations, focusing both on the global political dimen

Frances Stonor Saunders, an independent film producer and writer for the New Statesman, has now produced an authoritative modern history of the CIA and the Congress, as well as related organizations, focusing both on the global political dimen. She focuses on the global politics, but also on the individuals involved on all sides, the many prominent writers and intellectuals in the organizations, and what it looked like from the CIA's perspective, for which she makes use of newly declassified documents. She shows convincingly that the "non-Communist Left" was by and large bribed.

Who Paid the Piper? The CIA and the Cultural Cold War (. title The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters) is a 1999 book by Frances Stonor Saunders.

By Frances Stonor Saunders

By Frances Stonor Saunders. New York: The New Press, 2000. After the CIA established and funded the Congress for Cultural Freedom and Encounter magazine, did it then call all the shots? Did the Agency determine what the Congress should support or what Encounter should publish? Evidently, no.

Frances Stonor Saunders. Издательство: New Press. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Baroque & Rococo Architecture.

The Cultural Cold War book. In The Cultural Cold War, Frances Stonor Saunders reveals the extraordinary efforts of a secret campaign in which some of the most vocal exponents of intellectual freedom in the West were working for or subsidized During the Cold War, freedom of expression was vaunted as liberal democracy’s most cherished possession-but such freedom was put in service of a hidden agenda.

The cultural cold war. by. Frances Stonor Saunders. Central Intelligence Agency - Influence, Politics and culture - United States, Arts - Political aspects - United States, Arts, American - 20th century, Cold War - Social aspects - United States, Freedom and art - Political aspects - United States, United States - Cultural policy.

New book by Frances Stonor Saunders, The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of. .Ms. Stonor Saunders describes how the .

New book by Frances Stonor Saunders, The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters, details often absurd lengths to which Central Intelligence Agency went to spur anti-Communism, 1947-1967; cites scores of intellectual celebrities who directly or indirectly benefited from CIA largesse; notes CIA and its counterparts in other Western European nations spent freely to sponsor art exhibitions, intellectual conferences, concerts and magazines to press anti-Soviet agenda; drawings (M.

In The Cultural Cold War, Frances Stonor Saunders reveals the extraordinary efforts of a secret .

STONOR SAUNDERS, Frances, The Cultural Cold War: The CIA .

STONOR SAUNDERS, Frances, The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters, New York, The New Press, 2013, 427 pages, ISBN-10: 1595589147, 20 €, 17 . At one moment we hear Mary McCarthy’s voice in a letter to Hannah Arendt: The great effort of this new Right is to get itself accepted as normal. and this, it seems to me, must be scotched, if it’s not already too late (174). The fact is that, despite the revelations of late 1960s and the rise of the New Left, it was too late and is still too late today. As Saunders herself explains, the cultural Cold War did not simply end because of the revelations – rather it shamelessly continued.

Электронная книга "The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters", Frances Stonor Saunders

Электронная книга "The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters", Frances Stonor Saunders. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

During the Cold War, freedom of expression was vaunted as liberal democracy’s most cherished possession—but such freedom was put in service of a hidden agenda. In The Cultural Cold War, Frances Stonor Saunders reveals the extraordinary efforts of a secret campaign in which some of the most vocal exponents of intellectual freedom in the West were working for or subsidized by the CIA—whether they knew it or not.

Called “the most comprehensive account yet of the [CIA’s] activities between 1947 and 1967” by the New York Times, the book presents shocking evidence of the CIA’s undercover program of cultural interventions in Western Europe and at home, drawing together declassified documents and exclusive interviews to expose the CIA’s astonishing campaign to deploy the likes of Hannah Arendt, Isaiah Berlin, Leonard Bernstein, Robert Lowell, George Orwell, and Jackson Pollock as weapons in the Cold War. Translated into ten languages, this classic work—now with a new preface by the author—is “a real contribution to popular understanding of the postwar period” (The Wall Street Journal), and its story of covert cultural efforts to win hearts and minds continues to be relevant today.


Reviews about The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters (7):
interactive man
Wow, this will change your views on things regarding culture and popular culture. In a lot of way the post WWII art, music and literary culture was a creation of the CIA. One wonder if say the classical world had avoid a-tonal music and architect avoided just being about boxes what kinds of music and architecture we could have had. On the other hand, the CIA did pick out some talented folks to promote. If they hadn't, would there have been any kind of art scene in the US in the 50s, 60s, and 70s? One of the people cited in the book eventually created the TV show 8 IS ENOUGH which makes wonder about his taste and insights about art in general. In the book poets and English literature were more important than people who could write computer code.
Reighbyra
Most people are probably aware that the CIA sponsored a lot of activities, legal and extralegal, in the war against the Communist bloc known as the Cold War. But it is perhaps less well-known to what extent the CIA was involved in sponsoring, bribing and suborning writers, musicians, actors and intellectuals to agitate against the Soviet Union and its allies, as well as communism and Marxism in general. In particular the CIA-run organization "Congress for Cultural Freedom" and its flagship intellectual journal 'Encounter' had a great influence in the West in terms of effective propagandizing for the US point of view.

Frances Stonor Saunders, an independent film producer and writer for the New Statesman, has now produced an authoritative modern history of the CIA and the Congress, as well as related organizations, focusing both on the global political dimen. She focuses on the global politics, but also on the individuals involved on all sides, the many prominent writers and intellectuals in the organizations, and what it looked like from the CIA's perspective, for which she makes use of newly declassified documents. She shows convincingly that the "non-Communist Left" was by and large bribed or cajoled by the CIA, in so far as they didn't enthousiastically volunteer, into joining their propaganda front. She also shows that later denials by people such as Stephen Spender and Melvin Lasky of their knowledge of CIA involvement is extremely unrealistic and most likely just another lie.

That is not to say that this work is a polemic; far from it, Saunders writes very matter-of-factly and evenhandedly, and has little interest in discussing the merits of various political positions, though she does not fail to comment on the context of the Cold War at times, when she contrasts high-minded phrasery with the rather brutal and cynical realities of Vietnam, CIA activity in Latin America, the Soviet purges, the repression of Hungary, etc. The book is very extensive, making use of various sorts of sources, including interviews with important participants, in which they reflect remarkably often in a rather cynical way on their past activities. It's quite astounding how many famous writers, composers, intellectuals etc., from Nabokov's cousin to Stravinsky and from Russell to Stuart Hampshire, were involved in organized campaigns to attack and discredit their socialist colleagues. For that alone, this book is worth reading, that these crimes are not forgotten.
Androrim
One of the first books on this subject published in the 1970s, printed first in England under a different title, documenting Congressional initiated and funded C.I.A. activities in support of the arts and artists though government programs during the (1950s) "cold war." This, as a means of countering U.S.S.R. government sponsored art and literature propaganda. Interesting and revealing regarding possible influence that this Congressional support meant in the development of various styles of art in the U.S. Well documented and interesting to see the influence of these programs in the Cold War of the two great powers for the 10 - 20 years following the WW II.Well documented and footnoted, with comprehensive Bibliography. Reviews on Amazon demonstrate interesting opinions
Vaua
Very detailed and thoroughly researched into the post WWII history of the CIA and its efforts to rebut the Soviet propaganda using the CIA's own form of propaganda disguised as coming from the artists and intelligentsia.
Zeks Horde
There might be a few questions related to this book as in why was it present as it was and whom do authors like these represent within the modern police state but generally it is a great book that I hope is reprinted and around for a long time to come.
Arthunter
Fascinating. The chapter on abstract expressionism should be required reading.
Jox
Should be a must read for all students. Saunders has eloquently and meticulously unveiled the shadowy world behind the scenes.
The book was very well researched, I learned a lot about the actors in the cultural Cole War; however, where the author blames people like Koestler, Orwell, Josselson, Lasky etc. and often ridicules them, I admire them because they managed to destroy the Soviet Empire without a real war. Francis. S. Sounders even published some remarks that belong to the silliest ever made, for instance: "Hook's faith in Communism began to weaken after... a series of disastrous errors of judgement, theory and policy by Stalin." (p. 54) The author is really nice to Stalin, calling his mass murders "errors of judgement"!
F..S Sauders suffers by suffers by a very strong case of anti-Americanism.

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