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by David F. Musto

  • ISBN: 0195052110
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: David F. Musto
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Other formats: mobi doc lrf mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; Exp/Rep edition (January 14, 1988)
  • Pages: 400 pages
  • FB2 size: 1255 kb
  • EPUB size: 1367 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 784
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According to Dr. Musto, Americans' attitudes toward drugs have followed . .

Today's campaign to "crack down on crack" and the controversy surrounding mandatory drug-testing make the coverage of narcotics control in The American Disease timely and important. A classic study of the development of drug laws in the . the book examines the relations between public outcry and the creation of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War to the present day. (Originally published in 1973, the book is now updated by the addition of a new chapter and introduction to cover developments in the past 15 years. According to Dr. Musto, Americans' attitudes toward drugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Musto makes a persuasive case for thoughtful deliberation when framing a policy against the use and abuse of drugs. He is a national asset. The American Disease is a classic study of the development of drug laws in the United States. Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward drugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint. -the late Fred W. Friendly, former Director of Seminars on Media and Society, Columbia Graduate School of Journalism.

The American Disease is a classic study of the development of drug laws in the United States. Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward drugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint, author David F. Musto examines the relationz between public outcry and the creation of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War up to the present. Here, Musto thoroughly investigates how our nation has dealt with such issues as the controversies over prevention programs and mandatory minimum sentencing, the catastrophe of the crack epidemic, the fear of a heroin revival, and the continued debate over the legalization of marijuana.

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Musto, David . 1936-2010. New York : Oxford University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Results from Google Books. 5. State and Local Narcotic Control. 6. The Federal Assault on Addiction Maintenance. 9. Marihuana and the Federal Bureau of Narcotics. 10. Federal Support of the Medical Approach. 7. The Narcotic Clinic Era. 8. The Troubled Twenties. 11. The Return of Drug Toleration, 1965-1985. 12. Renewed Efforts at Control, 1986-1997. 13. The Dynamics of Narcotic Control.

Monastic Philosophy of the Origins of University Education. Charles Ogundu Nnaji. 54028 2 476 Downloads 3 167 Views Citations. Pub. Date: March 26, 2015.

The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control. David Franklin Musto (January 8, 1936 – October 8, 2010) was an American expert on . 1 daughter and 3 sons. drug policy and the War on Drugs who served as a government adviser on the subject during the Presidency of Jimmy Carter. He wrote extensively on the history of licit and illicit drugs and the process by which many of them were placed under governmental control.

Today's campaign to "crack down on crack" and the controversy surrounding mandatory drug-testing make the coverage of narcotics control in The American Disease timely and important. A classic study of the development of drug laws in the U.S., the book examines the relations between public outcry and the creation of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War to the present day. (Originally published in 1973, the book is now updated by the addition of a new chapter and introduction to cover developments in the past 15 years.) According to Dr. Musto, Americans' attitudes toward drugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint. Marshalling an impressive amount of evidence, he supports the theory that acceptance wanes over a 20 to 30-year period of extensive drug use and is followed by a period of intolerance, during which there is a danger of excessive restraints and false links between drug use and feared minorities. At the turn of the century, when cocaine changed suddenly from the all-American tonic to the most feared of all drugs, it was linked to fears of black Americans. Racial tensions in the American South increased, lynchings reached a peak, and law officers increased the caliber of their guns. Proponents of the closing of opiate-maintenance clinics, who succeeded with a 1919 Supreme Court decision outlawing the maintenance of "drug fiends," wildly exaggerated the number of drug users and linked them to feared immigrant groups such as the Chinese. The first federal anti-marijuana law, in 1937, was partly a response to the threat of laid-off Mexican farm workers, who cultivated the plant for personal use. In detailing the connection between waves of public repulsion and narcotics control, Musto examines American foreign policy and the role played by physicians and the emerging pharmaceutical industry. While not prescriptive, his book offers needed insights as we enter yet another phase of drug intolerance--the second this century. Musto raises critical questions lawmakers and other citizens must consider as they devise ways of curbing drug use while avoiding the sort of Draconian overkill that has in the past set the stage for a reactionary wave of drug enthusiasm. In particular, he expresses concern over the potential for drug testing to be overzealously applied in an attempt to "eliminate" drug abuse from American society.
Reviews about The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control (Oxford paperbacks) (7):
WtePSeLNaGAyko
An excellent book, although disturbing. As Santayana (no, not Santa Ana) said, "Those who do not learn from the past, are condemned to repeat it."
Covers a number of methods that were tried in the effort to control drug abuse, as well as other factors of that era that affected or were affected by narcotics addiction during the time period covered; id est, early 1800's through 1930
Landamath
This book is an excellent and detailed history of narcotic control/regulation. The author integrates the social attitudes, political climate and actors, as well as foreign policy issues. He discusses the prevailing medical theories of addiction and how these effected laws and enforcement. He included some information on cannabis but this is mostly about narcotic and cocaine control I learned quite a lot. I certainly recommend this book for the serious student of the historical antecedents of the current war on drugs.
Kulwes
WAS ONE OF THE MOST INFORMATIVE BOOK ON THE HISTORY OF THE SO CALLED "WAR ON DRUGS," ....THE AUTHOR MAKES COMPELLING ARGUMENTS AND PROOFS THAT THE CRIMINALIZATION OF RECREATIONAL DRUGS HAS ITS ROOTS IN WHITE FEAR OF ASIAN'S AND AFRICAN AMERICAN'S RATHER THEN SCIENCE. THE CONSEQUENCES OF WHICH WE ARE STILL LIVING WITH TODAY. THIS BOOK IS A MUST READ FOR ANYONE WISHES TO GET A BETTER UNDERSTANDING ON THE "WAR ON DRUGS".
Trash Obsession
I purchased this book for a college report and found a ton of unknown information that I personally did not know about Narcotics. Good report and good book.
Dellevar
this book is a must for a bookshelf of any scholar - or any informed layperson - in drugs / addictology.
salivan
Despite significant praise for this work I didn't find anything particularly interesting or authoritative in it. People have been stuffing natural substances in every orifice of their body to alter their state of consciousness in every known culture of the World for 8,000 years. Musto pretends this is an "American" problem.
Whilingudw
This is the book on the history of drug policy in the USA. Musto details the whole history of the regulation of addictive from the beginning of the 20th century to the years of the Clinton administration. There is particular emphasis on Federal drug policy. Musto shows well how drug policy has oscillated between relative tolerance and stringent efforts to crackdown on the use of potentially addictive drugs. Musto is particularly good at demonstrating how apparently extrinsic factors influenced strongly Federal response to narcotic regulation. Fears of Federal regulation by physicians, aspects of Progressive era reformist zeal, even foreign policy considerations are shown to be important influences on Federal drug policy. While this is not a social history of drug use, Musto is careful to show how attempts at regulation were often influenced by misperceptions of the extent of drug abuse. There are some surprising aspects to Musto's story. Federal regulation of narcotics, backed by important Supreme Court decisions, was an early example of expansive Federal power superceding state and local regulation. One of Musto's most interesting observations is the considerable extent to which racist fears of Chinese immigrants, Mexican migrants, and African-Americans influenced early efforts to control narcotics tightly. Readers will find this book very informative with a strong sense of deja vu; contemporary debates about drug policy are similar in many ways to debates occurring early in the 20th century. This fact illustrates the difficuly developing sensible and effective policies towards drugs with addictive potential.
I picked this up because of the ongoing "war on drugs" that politicians mention, as well as changing attitudes about certain drugs that I've noticed over the last decade. Musto gives a very thorough history of drug use, laws, and attitudes in the US over the last century. I would recommend this to anyone who has any interest in narcotics in the US. I found the writing to be a little dry, but unbiased. We've been riding a see-saw going back and forth between drug tolerance and drug intolerance, and the book wonderfully describes this.

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