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by Laura A. Belmonte

  • ISBN: 0812221192
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Laura A. Belmonte
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Other formats: mobi doc lrf txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (August 3, 2010)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • FB2 size: 1196 kb
  • EPUB size: 1111 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 395
Download Selling the American Way: U.S. Propaganda and the Cold War fb2

Professor Belmonte's book interview ran here as cover feature on April 14, 2009.

Laura A. Belmonte is Associate Professor of History at Oklahoma State University. Professor Belmonte's book interview ran here as cover feature on April 14, 2009.

Selling the American Way . Propaganda and the Cold War. Laura A. Belmonte. 272 pages 6 x 9 10 illus. Belmonte has produced an invaluable contribution that should be examined by everyone interested in understanding public diplomacy and in building an effective public diplomacy campaign. In 1955, the United States Information Agency published a lavishly illustrated booklet called My America.

Selling the American Way book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Selling the American Way: . Propaganda and the Cold War as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Propaganda and the Cold War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The book's first main goal is to explore how American information strategists developed a. .

The book's first main goal is to explore how American information strategists developed a basic conception of America and then consider how this conception often clashed with the cultural and social realities of the late 1940s and 50. Belmonte's work offers an excellent analysis of the intersection between information and propaganda programs with . cultural diplomacy during the Cold War. Readers will note a few weaknesses, however.

Selling the American Way" examines the context, content, and reception of . 2008 272 pages 6 x 9 10 illus. information experts defined the national interest not only in geopolitical, economic, and military terms. Through radio shows, films, and publications, they also propagated a carefully constructed cultural narrative of freedom, progress, and abundance as a means of protecting national security.

Selling the American Way examines the context, content, and reception of . As world war II ended, . policymakers relished their nation’s new predominant status.

Published by: University of Pennsylvania Press. Selling the American Way examines the context, content, and reception of .

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Request PDF On Jun 1, 2009, Gregory Mitrovich and others published Selling the American Way: . Russian emigre literature was more an arm of the Cold War than a literary venture in its own right. The sound of a superpower: Musical Americanism and the cold war. January 2018. Classical composers seeking to create an American sound enjoyed unprecedented success during the 1930s and 1940s.

Selling the American Way documents how . Though hyperbolic, My America was, as Laura A. Belmonte shows, merely one of hundreds of pamphlets from this era written and distributed in an organized attempt to forge a collective defense of the "American way of life.

Cold War movie posters are propaganda pieces of their own. Using bold fonts, color palettes and characters that recall imagery found in.Selling the American Way: . Propaganda and the Cold War by Laura A. Belmonte

Selling the American Way: . Red Scared! The Commie Menace in Propaganda and Popular Culture by Michaeal Barson and Steven Heller. Television and Cold War Propaganda, 1947-1960 by Nancy E. Bernhard.

In 1955, the United States Information Agency published a lavishly illustrated booklet called My America. Assembled ostensibly to document "the basic elements of a free dynamic society," the booklet emphasized cultural diversity, political freedom, and social mobility and made no mention of McCarthyism or the Cold War. Though hyperbolic, My America was, as Laura A. Belmonte shows, merely one of hundreds of pamphlets from this era written and distributed in an organized attempt to forge a collective defense of the "American way of life."

Selling the American Way examines the context, content, and reception of U.S. propaganda during the early Cold War. Determined to protect democratic capitalism and undercut communism, U.S. information experts defined the national interest not only in geopolitical, economic, and military terms. Through radio shows, films, and publications, they also propagated a carefully constructed cultural narrative of freedom, progress, and abundance as a means of protecting national security. Not simply a one-way look at propaganda as it is produced, the book is a subtle investigation of how U.S. propaganda was received abroad and at home and how criticism of it by Congress and successive presidential administrations contributed to its modification.


Reviews about Selling the American Way: U.S. Propaganda and the Cold War (3):
Boyn
School
Biaemi
Very even-handed discussion of the Cold War period, following WW II, and how the two nuclear powers dealt with what could have been a "hot" war, but wasn't due to the cleverly pitted propaganda programs of the two countries. The U.S. handled it by emphasizing individual freedom in writing, art and music as opposed to the U.S.S.R. which used governmental oversight and control of what was considered the "peoples' art. The interesting information in the book, which is not readily available, is the U.S. influence and promotion of various art forms, such as abstract expressionism and various musical forms through government financed programs and exhibits, as well as C.I.A. supported programs through Congressional government agencies. Well documented with citations, footnotes, and bibliography, the book is useful in reviewing how during the "cold war" art styles and artists were promoted by (sometimes) financial support of governments,which may have influenced art dealers, museums, and galleries over the 10-20 years of the cold war period.
Bad Sunny
"Selling the American Way" is on the ROROTOKO list of cutting-edge intellectual nonfiction. Professor Belmonte's book interview ran here as cover feature on April 14, 2009.

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