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by Richard M Capobianco

  • ISBN: 1442641592
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Richard M Capobianco
  • Subcategory: Philosophy
  • Other formats: lit azw mbr docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division (April 24, 2010)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • FB2 size: 1429 kb
  • EPUB size: 1573 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 701
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Series: New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Customers who bought this item also bought. Heidegger's Way of Being clearly and calmly focuses on the point that Being is The Subject for Heidegger. Capobianco has a clear mastery of Heidegger's texts, and explicates them in a way that demonstrates Heidegger's own clarity on the topic. Robert Mugerauer, University of Washington. Series: New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics.

New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics

New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics. By (author) Richard Capobianco. TABLE OF CONTENTS Engaging Heidegger by Richard Capobianco Acknowledgments Foreword by William J. Richardson Introduction I The Fate of Being II Ereignis: (Only) Another Name for Being Itself III The Turn Toward Home IV From Angst to Astonishment V Lichtung: The Early Lighting VI Plato's Light and the Phenomenon of the Clearing VII Building: Centering, Decentering, Recentering VIII Limit and Transgression Afterword.

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Items related to Engaging Heidegger (New Studies in Phenomenology an. .Capobianco gives special attention to Heidegger's resonant terms Ereignis and Lichtung and reads them as saying and showing the very same fundamental phenomenon named ‘Being itself ’.Capobianco, Richard M Engaging Heidegger (New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics). ISBN 13: 9781442641594.

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Heidegger's Way of Being (New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics). by. Richard M. Capobianco. In Heidegger’s Way of Being, the follow-up to his 2010 book, Engaging Heidegger, Richard Capobianco makes the case clearly and compellingly that the core matter of Heidegger’s lifetime of thought was Being as the temporal emergence of all beings and things. Drawing upon a wide variety of texts, many of which have been previously untranslated, Capobianco illuminates the overarching importa.

Richard Capobianco’s book, Engaging Heidegger, is an example of the best type of scholarship in Heidegger studies. He offers eight careful studies that trace developments, changes, turns and returns in Heidegger’s thought as they relate to specific themes and topics

Richard Capobianco’s book, Engaging Heidegger, is an example of the best type of scholarship in Heidegger studies. He offers eight careful studies that trace developments, changes, turns and returns in Heidegger’s thought as they relate to specific themes and topics.

In this vein, Heidegger and his followers spoke of hermeneutics, the art of.

In this vein, Heidegger and his followers spoke of hermeneutics, the art of interpretation in context, especially social and linguistic context. 3) We analyze the form of a type of experience. Indeed, phenomenology and the modern concept of intentionality emerged hand-in-hand in Husserl’s Logical Investigations (1900–01). In Being and Time Heidegger approached phenomenology, in a quasi-poetic idiom, through the root meanings of logos and phenomena, so that phenomenology is defined as the art or practice of letting things show themselves.

Thomas Langan presents his exegesis study of Martin Heidegger’s .

Thomas Langan presents his exegesis study of Martin Heidegger’s phenomenology with a critical discourse of Heidegger’s epistemology and ontology. For Langan, Heidegger developed a new position in philosophy that fits his existential notions of being. The phenomenology of Martin Heidegger influenced the existentialist philosophers in France especially, the Jean Paul Sartre’s famous work ‘L'Être et le néant: Essai d'ontologie phénoménologique’ or ‘Being and Nothingness’, was based on the writing of Heideggerian philosophy.

One of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century, Martin Heidegger was primarily concerned with the ‘question of Being.’ However, recent scholarship has tended to marginalize the importance of the name of Being in his thought. Through a focused reading of Heidegger's texts, and especially his late and often overlooked Four Seminars (1966-1973), Richard Capobianco counters this trend by redirecting attention to the centrality of the name of Being in Heidegger's lifetime of thought.

Capobianco gives special attention to Heidegger's resonant terms Ereignis and Lichtung and reads them as saying and showing the very same fundamental phenomenon named ‘Being itself ’. Written in a clear and approachable manner, the essays in Engaging Heidegger examine Heidegger's thought in view of ancient Greek, medieval, and Eastern thinking, and they draw out the deeply humane character of his ‘meditative thinking.’


Reviews about Engaging Heidegger (New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics) (5):
Fato
So many people struggle with Heidegger's writings, but Richard gives the reader a one-stop-shop for understanding the main concepts. If one wants to get the implications of Heidegger's thought and don't want to spend a curriculum investigating, this is the place. The similarities to Buddhism are apparent but desire doesn't have to be eradicated. The most important take away is to stop trying to control what is uncontrollable, notice the interdependence of all "things", and be grateful for the ride of life. Anybody interested in Heidegger's mode of thinking should try Terrence Malick's movies to get a sense of the fluidity of experience when living this way.
Winenama
This is a book for anyone interested in Heidegger, phenomenology and/or Continental Philosophy. Capobianco offers a refreshing (and accurate) perspective to the litter of Heideggerian work focusing, for some reason, on the grim, anxiety-ridden, finite, wounded, etc. individual existing subject. While Heidegger, of course, does outline some of these facets of Dasein (the human kind of being), they are certainly not the centerpiece of his work, nor do they occupy most of Heidegger's attention. Heidegger's thinking is a sustained reverie, reflection, meditation upon Being and our relationship to Being. Capobianco reflects the whole of Heidegger's work and makes it accessible -- no small feat.
Golden freddi
Richard Capobianco's 'text' (highest compliment for 'book') "Engaging Heidegger is both 'delight' and extremely thought provoking. A putative defense of Heidegger's use of the concept of Being/Beyng to organize the entirety of his (Heidegger's) oeuvre, it proves so much more. It is, among other things, a thoughtful excursus across the entirety of the Heideggerian oeuvre such that it could be used as a propaedeutic, and it should have as much interest for the professional scholar as it did for me, a 'professional' novitiate. There just is something for everyone. Anyone struggling to come to grips with the difficult work of Heidegger could do worse than to start here. Up front, Capobianco provides a schema of most, if not all, of the names that Heidegger used to 'indicate' Being/Beyng along with the Greek counterparts and English translations. 'It' of itself is worth the price of admission but it proves only to be the icing on Capobianco's idiomatic thinking that just is 'syncretic.' Capobianco brings Heidegger to a definition of Being/Beyng in his own syncretic way and that definition is just worth contemplating, worth subjecting to the silence of 'a' thinking. Buy this book!
Kieel
This book is a discussion, in eight essays, of several key issues in Heidegger's thinking. It is an excellent analysis of these issues although it is not a "front door" to Heidegger--it is not an introduction to the thinker because it assumes prior familiarity with his writing, with some of these issues, with Greek, and perhaps with German. I have enough of most of them to appreciate what the book offers, and I have learned enough German vocabulary not to be lost in the complex etymologies and comparisons. The book does advance significantly the study of one of the Twentieth Century's most important philosophical figures.

A primary issue addressed in perhaps most of the essays concerns Heidegger's famous "Kehre" or turn: the question whether or not he changed his mind and the direction of his thinking over the course of his career. The first two essays, on Being and Ereignis (appropriation or enownment) respectively, seem to answer that umbrella issue in the negative. Capobianco makes what appears to be a very good case, with citations from different of Heidegger's texts, that Being itself remains the one over-arching concern from perhaps before the writing of "Being and Time" and throughout his career. Ereignes, a term introduced later than "Being and Time", is argued to be "(only) another name for Being itself". And Being, however it is spoken of, remains the fundamental matter for thought.

However beyond the first couple of essays a "turn" is discerned in the "mood" of Dasein in the world. Early in his career, Heidegger analyzes Dasein as "not-at-home" in the world, as immersed in Angst, anxiety, when confronting its being in the world authentically. This famously is a primary direction of Heidegger's existentialism early in his career, perhaps the only direction noticed by some other thinkers such as Sartre. Later, however, Heidegger speaks of the human as able to be at home in Being, and he utilizes the term "Dasein" itself less and less. "The ultimate destination of the human being is 'home', dwelling near the Source, the Origin, Being as such." (p. 62) In the third and fourth essays Capobianco describes Heidegger as turning from the mood of Angst as primary for Dasein to the moods of awe, wonder, and astonishment for the human being realizing the shining forth of Being, the astonishing fact that there are any beings in Being at all.

Another important shift or turn, documented in the fifth and sixth essays, concerns Heidegger's use of terms seeming related to "light"--the lighting itself and, later, the "clearing". Early in his career he emphasizes the metaphor of light, but later he denies that light as such has anything to do with the metaphor of the (forest) clearing, both terms being etymologically related in German. The reason for this unacknowledged shift apparently, according to Capobianco, has to do with Heidegger's perception that "light" carries too much baggage from the Western metaphysical and theological traditions. The "clearing" is able to allow the light but also the emptiness of or withdrawal of Being, the Dark that opens for the light, the concealedness of truth, the No-thing.

The final two essays are concerned with dwelling and Heidegger's influence on architecture, and with a comparison of his and Jacques Lacan's ideas on human limitation, both thinkers using "Antigone" as a theme for the human's confrontation with fate and transgression of limits. And a final, short Afterword summarizes the primary findings of the book. "The Simple--Being itself--is the temporal-spatial flow of all beings: the coming and going, appearing and disappearing, arriving and departing of beings; the emerging and lingering and passing away of all that is." (p. 142) "To release ourselves to the inexhaustibly rich and ultimately mysterious temporal-spatial presencing of beings is to find ourselves not primarily anxious--though ontological anxiety remains--but, moreover, to find ourselves astonished and joyful and thankful that we exist 'at all'." (p. 143) These quotes effectively capture the mood of Capobianco's approach to Heidegger, and, since this approach is convincing, they present a valuable perspective on the fecundity of the late German's thinking.

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