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by David M. Rosenthal

  • ISBN: 0195046706
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: David M. Rosenthal
  • Subcategory: Philosophy
  • Other formats: lrf lrf mobi mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (March 21, 1991)
  • Pages: 656 pages
  • FB2 size: 1732 kb
  • EPUB size: 1918 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 727
Download The Nature of Mind fb2

We seem to understand the mind readily enough from our own experience. What causes problems is articulating what we know objectively, that is, in terms that are independent and of our own case.

The Nature of Mind book. Since the dawn of history philosophers have speculated about the. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. David M. Rosenthal. Since the dawn of history philosophers have speculated about the nature of mind.

David M. Rosenthal is a philosopher at the City University of New York (CUNY) who has made significant contributions to the philosophy of mind, particularly in the area of consciousness. He was educated at the University of Chicago and then Princeton University.

Consciousness and Mind presents David Rosenthal's influential work on the nature of consciousness. The first four essays develop various aspects of that theory. The next three essays present Rosenthal's homomorphism theory of mental qualities and qualitative consciousness, and show how that theory fits with and helps sustain the HOT theory.

by. Rosenthal, David M. Publication date. New York : Oxford University Press.

This anthology brings together readings mainly from contemporary philosophers, but also from writers of the past two centuries, on the philosophy of mind. Some of the main questions addressed are: is a human being really a mind in relation to a body; if so, what exactly is this mind and how it is related to the body; and are there any grounds for supposing that the mind survives the disintegration of the body?

Since the dawn of history philosophers have speculated about the nature of mind.

Since the dawn of history philosophers have speculated about the nature of mind.

Oxford University Press, 1991. Materialism and the mind-body problem. Hackett Publishing, 2000. The independence of consciousness and sensory quality. Philosophical issues 1, 15-36, 1991.

Since the dawn of history philosophers have speculated about the nature of mind. What kind of thing is the mind?

Since the dawn of history philosophers have speculated about the nature of mind.

Publication Date - March 1991.


Reviews about The Nature of Mind (5):
Groll
The print is too small. The content is excellent.
Blueshaper
I'm taking a course right now called Philosophy of Mind, and this is one of our textbooks. The topic is fascinating to me, has been for years, in fact is something I have been discussing for years with my philosophy-professor-brother-in-law.

But gosh, did they have to use such a teeny tiny typeface? It's giving me a headache! And when they have a quoted passage within an article, THAT is even TINIER! Oh my! Please pass the Excedrin!

Okay, given that it's a somewhat sizable book, and HEAVY for its size, and using a larger font would make the book larger - okay, so make the book larger! It could stand to grow a bit! The too-small print is costing you 2 stars! Seriously! I really do have a headache, and it's not from the topic!
Olwado
Editor David Rosenthal wrote in the Introduction to this 1991 collection, "Despite our seemingly immediate grasp of mental states, it is often hard to put into words what we know about mind. We seem to understand the mind readily enough from our own experience. What causes problems is articulating what we know objectively, that is, in terms that are independent and of our own case. This raises a problem about how the study of mind should proceed. Are mental processes subject to scientific study, as other natural phenomena are? Or is the study of mind limited to our everyday, commonsense descriptions of mental states? If there can be a science of mind, what is its status relative to the other sciences? The readings collected here reflect these concerns." (Pg. 3-4) A wide variety of papers and excerpts are included (including from Descartes, Locke, and Thomas Reid), but the vast majority of the collection is given over to contempory philosophers, such as Ryle, Anscombe, Strawson, Rorty, Putnam, Smart, Block, Quine, Chisholm, Dennett, Sellars, Nagel, Stich, Searle, etc.

D.M. Armstrong argues, "But, in fact, the apprehension of something must be distinct from the thing apprehended. For if not, we are faced with a flagrant circularity. Having a pain logically involves apprehension of---what? The pain itself! This is as bad as saying that to be a cat logically involves being the offspring of cats. It seems, therefore, that there must always be a distinction between BEING in a certain mental state and BEING AWARE that we are in that state. Hence there can be no indubitable introspective knowledge." (Pg. 129)

J.J.C. Smart explains the Identity Theory (or "topic-neutral") theory of mind: "Let me first try to state more accurately the thesis that sensations are brain-processes... in so far as 'after-image' or 'ache' is a report of a process, it is a report of a process that HAPPENS TO BE a brain process... the thesis does not claim that sensation statements can be TRANSLATED into statements about brain processes. Nor does it claim that the logic of a sensation statement is the same as that of a brain-process statement. All it claims is that in so far as a sensation statement is a report of something, that something is in fact a brain process. Sensations are nothing over and above brain processes." (Pg. 170) He adds, "if the brain process theory and dualism are equally consistent with the facts, then the principles of parsimony and simplicity seem to me to decide overwhelmingly in favor of the brain-process theory." (Pg. 175)

D. M. Armstrong says, "My view is that the identification of mental states with physical states of the brain is a perfectly intelligible one... The analysis proposed may be called the Causal analysis of the mental concepts. According to this view, the concept of a mental state essentially involves, and is exhausted by, the concept of a state that is apt to be the cause of certain effects or apt to be the effect of certain causes." (Pg. 183)

In a paper on left/right hemisphere differences, Thomas Nagel says, "I do not wish to claim that the line between conscious and unconscious mental activity is a sharp one. It is even possible that the distinction is partly relative, in the sense that a given item of mental activity may be assignable to consciousness of not, depending on what other mental activities of the same person are going on at the same time." (Pg. 436)

J.A. Fodor asserts, "Searle gives no clue as to why he thinks the biochemistry is important for intentionality and, prima facie, the idea that what counts is how the organism is connected to the world seems far more plausible. After all, it's easy enough to imagine ... how the fact that my thought is causally connected to a tree might bear on its being a thought about a tree. But it's hard to imagine how the fact that ... my thought is made out of hydrocarbons could matter, except on the unlikely hypothesis that only hydrocarbons can be causally connected to trees in the way that brains are." (Pg. 521)

This is an excellent collection, for anyone studying the philosophy of mind---particularly the contemporary debates.
Auau
This collection of articles is one of the best available in phil. of mind. Its range and completeness is amazing, starting from selections of Descartes, Locke and Reid up to papers on eliminative materialism and machine functionalism. I'd definitely recommend this for anybody willing to get serious about the subject. If you haven't already studied the papers contained here, do it, for they 're absolutely fundamental to our current understanding of the problems in the phil. of mind.
Shadowbourne
"Since the dawn of history philosophers have speculated about the nature of mind." Nice.

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