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by Garma C.C. Chang

  • ISBN: 0042940761
  • Category: Politics
  • Author: Garma C.C. Chang
  • Subcategory: Philosophy
  • Other formats: txt mbr doc azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Allen & Unwin (July 20, 1972)
  • Pages: 296 pages
  • FB2 size: 1677 kb
  • EPUB size: 1261 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 636
Download Buddhist Teaching of Totality: The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism fb2

Pennsylvania State University Press (1971). Similar books and articles Buddhism and Transgression: The Appropriation of Buddhism in the Contemporary West. Adrian Konik - 2009 - Brill

Pennsylvania State University Press (1971). Similar books and articles. The Taoist Influence on Hua-Yen Buddhism: A Case of the Sinicization of Buddhism in China. Buddhism and Transgression: The Appropriation of Buddhism in the Contemporary West. Adrian Konik - 2009 - Brill. Entry Into the Inconceivable: An Introduction to Hua-Yen Buddhism. Thomas Cleary - 1983 - University of Hawai'i Press. Nālandā- Buddhism and the World: Golden Jubilee Volume. R. Panth (e. - 2001 - Nava Nalanda Mahavihara.

The Hwa Yen school of Mahayana Buddhism bloomed in China in the 7th and 8th centuries . Today many scholars regard its doctrines of Emptiness, Totality, and Mind-Only as the crown of Buddhist thought and as a useful and unique philosophical system and explanation of man, world, and life as intuitively experienced in Zen practice.

Following an introductory section describing the essential differences between Judeo-Christian and Buddhist philosophy, Professor Chang provides an extensive, expertly developed section on the philosophical foundations of Hwa Yen Buddhism dealing with the core concept of True.

Following an introductory section describing the essential differences between Judeo-Christian and Buddhist philosophy, Professor Chang provides an extensive, expertly developed section on the philosophical foundations of Hwa Yen Buddhism dealing with the core concept of True Voidness, the philosophy of Totality, and the doctrine of Mind-Only. A concluding section includes selections of Hwa Yen readings and biographies of the patriarchs, as well as a glossary and list of Chinese terms.

This book is highly recommended to advanced students of Buddhism and to Westerners whose interests in Buddhism incline toward the metaphysical and phenomenological.

That The Buddhist Teaching of Totality is a unique and long-needed contribution to Buddhological literature in English cannot be denied. This book is highly recommended to advanced students of Buddhism and to Westerners whose interests in Buddhism incline toward the metaphysical and phenomenological.

The Hwa Yen school of Mahāyāna Buddhism bloomed in China in the 7th and 8th centuries . For the first time in any Western The Hwa Yen school of Mahāyāna Buddhism bloomed in China in the 7th and 8th centuries .

The finest quality of this book is the clarity and simplicity with which Professor Chang discusses these topic. t is certainly to be recommended. Journal of Asian Studies. This would be a highly useful book for any college or university library. Highly recommended for purchase. Part One: The Realm of Totality. Part Two: The Philosophical Foundations of Hwa Yen Buddhism. Part Three: A Selection of Hwa Yen Readings and the Biographies of the Patriarchs.

Chang, Garma C. C. Verfasser. Publication, Distribution, et. Univ.

The Buddhist Teaching of Totality, The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism (1971). Asanga: The 4th century Indian master who founded the Yogcara or Mind Only School of Buddhist philosophy

The Buddhist Teaching of Totality, The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism (1971). Joy Peach Gender Imagery Lotus Sutra. ACI Course Book 2-Buddhist Refuge, Level 1 of Prajna Paramita. Asanga: The 4th century Indian master who founded the Yogcara or Mind Only School of Buddhist philosophy. He is said to have directly received the instructions of the celestial Bodhisattva Maitreya, which he transcribed in the form of five works known as the Five Treaties of Maitreya. Ashoka: A Buddhist monarch of 300 . the third emperor of the Mauryan Dynasty, who unified most of India under his rule and fostered the dissemination of Buddhism.

THE BUDDHIST TEACHING OF TOTALITY The Philosophy of H wa Yen .

THE BUDDHIST TEACHING OF TOTALITY The Philosophy of H wa Yen Buddhism THE BUDDHIST TEACHING OF TOTALITY THE BUDDHIST TEACHING OF TOTALITY The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism Garma C. Chang THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS University Park and London Previous Books in English by Garma C. Chang include: THE PRACTICE OF ZEN THE TEACHINGS OF TIBETAN YOGA THE HUNDRED THOUSAND. The Hwa Yen Siitra has one central concern: to reveal the Buddha-Realm of Infinity.


Reviews about Buddhist Teaching of Totality: The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism (7):
Zan
The book is well written with very good and clear explanations and examples/parables to enhance the meanings. However, the ereader version has many typo errors.
Legend 33
Thanks. No problems..
Marad
For an easy ride, visit Disneyland. C.C. Chang's study of the Hua Yen is a demanding work, because it presuposes that the reader wishes to find such insight - through practice. The Hua Yen Ching is said to have been expounded immediately after the Buddha's own enlightenment. It is one of the few sutras that actually endeavour to hint about the enlightened state itself- positively, rather than obliquely, by referring to it in relation to what it is not (viz. asrava, klesa defilements, trsna, dualism) - the 'neither-nor' aspect. Hua Yen deals with the 'mutually inclusive' dimension(s) of totality. Beware! Too many Western writings on Hua Yen (Kegon) jump straight into shih-shih wu ai - the 'non-obstruction between thing-events.' But actually, without insight into li-shih wu ai, seeing 'form' as grounded in the kung or 'void' aspect, nobody knows anything about shih-shih wu ai. C.C. Chang had the best Chinese and Tibetan teachers. He writes with authority - because he writes with eperiential insight into what the Hua Yen teaches. I've savoured Chang's work for 25 years, yet it remnains as inspiring and stimulating, as the day I first saw it. A lifelong study this. Find the meaning in your own experience. Candy is for the kids!
Jare
The Hwa Yen school, which drew chiefly from the Avatamsaka Sutra (translated by Cleary), emphasizes Dharma from the perspective of realization, or enlightened mind. Like the Lotus Sutra, The Avatamsaka Sutra is equally an evocation of a state of mind as a presentation of information. The Hwa Yen thinkers of Sung China used this as their starting point to paint a dazzling portrait of our universe filled with mind-blowing images and rich ideas.
This is a pretty good introduction to Hwa Yen Buddhism, although the reader will have to wade through a fair amount of unapologetic sectarianism. Hwa Yen, we learn, is the "highest" and "most advanced" form of Buddhism, and Chang clearly considers himself to have full knowledge of what Buddha "really meant" in his teachings. Despite this sometimes tedious lack of modesty, the book is a good overview of the history and doctrine of this school. Given the unfortunate paucity of material on this intriguing movement, that is a welcome addition.
Nagis
The first reviewer says skip this and go to Thomas Cleary. I would assume that means "Entry into the Inconceivable". I have both actually, and I like "The Buddhist Teaching of Totality" better.
To me, the Cleary approach seems to be just to pick you up and dump you right into the middle of things. By page 24, you're already into the four dharmadatu's. These are very subtle concepts that require serious preparation to understand deeply. They may be interesting doctrines if you're into that kind of thing, but I personally like to see how all the pieces fit together. In that sense, I'm totally lost. The Garma Chang book covers a lot more basics before going into the heavy stuff. The pace may be slower, but in the end, I have a much clearer picture. And after that, the Cleary book becomes much more palatable.
Another reviewer mentioned that Garma Chang seems to think he knows everything. I don't know, but from the writing, it's clear that he has a great deal of personal experience on the subject at hand. His discussion on emptyness, for example, is particularly subtle and insightful. Thomas Cleary, on the other hand, doesn't seem to show much opinion of his own. Much of the "Entry into the Inconceivable" text is translated from Chinese works. Same goes for his translation of the Avatamsaka Sutra itself as well. Even the introduction is paraphrasing of Chinese text. Not that translation is not useful of course...
A bonus included in the Garma Chang book is an almost complete translation of "The Great Vows of Samantabhadra". It is important because it's supposed to give one a good feel for what the complete Avatamsaka is like. It is the last part of the Forty Hwa Yen and is often treated as a separate sutra on its own. (It's also classified as one of the Five Sutras of Pure Land) And it's not in Cleary's English translation of Avatamsaka Sutra, which is strictly a translation of Eighty Hwa Yen.
In any case, I'd probably get both books. They serve different purposes. Seems to me that the person who says to skip this one is treating the meaning of the books as self-existent and real and therefore their relative merit should be completely self-evident. We all know that is not true right?

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