» » Louis Armstrong's New Orleans

Download Louis Armstrong's New Orleans fb2

by Thomas Brothers

  • ISBN: 039333001X
  • Category: Photo and Art
  • Author: Thomas Brothers
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Other formats: docx lrf txt lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (April 17, 2007)
  • Pages: 400 pages
  • FB2 size: 1988 kb
  • EPUB size: 1240 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 849
Download Louis Armstrong's New Orleans fb2

The story of Louis Armstrong's musical influences while growing up in early twentieth-century New Orleans is fascinating.

Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). The story of Louis Armstrong's musical influences while growing up in early twentieth-century New Orleans is fascinating. The time, place and characters are vividly recreated here in fine detail.

Louis Armstrong's New Orleans book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Louis Armstrong's New Orleans as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Louis Armstrong's New Orleans. Louis Armstrong's New Orleans. by. Thomas David Brothers. Armstrong, Louis, 1901-1971, Jazz musicians - United States - Biography, Jazz - Louisiana - New Orleans - History and criticism. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Read our guide to New Orleans jazz legend Louis Armstrong, and learn more about the lasting legacy of this .

Read our guide to New Orleans jazz legend Louis Armstrong, and learn more about the lasting legacy of this musical icon. However, Armstrong’s first contact with formal musical training came in 1912 at the Colored Waif’s Home for Boys, where he was sent after firing his step-father’s pistol into the air during a New Year’s Eve celebration. It was inside this detention facility that Armstrong claimed, ‘me and music got married.

Thomas Brothers has pulled off the near-impossible for a youngish man living in the 21st century

Thomas Brothers has pulled off the near-impossible for a youngish man living in the 21st century. He has managed to dissect and explain most of the complex social and musical interactions in New Orleans as they existed in the years when Louis Armstrong was growing up, coming of age, and learning his way around the horn and the music business. He adroitly explains how the social and cultural climate of New Orleans was exactly right for not only the formation of the music we call jazz, but also how it trickled down from the uptown African-Americans to the downtown Creoles

The best book ever produced about Louis Armstrong by anyone other than the man himself.

The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden Еще одно интересное место в Новом Орлеане. Сад скульптур - уникальный культурный проект, созданный прямо в городском парке Нового Орлеана

The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden Еще одно интересное место в Новом Орлеане. Сад скульптур - уникальный культурный проект, созданный прямо в городском парке Нового Орлеана. Он является частью Новоорлеанского Музея Искусств, куда мы, к сожалению, не попали. Кстати, вход в сам парк.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Louis Armstrong, Master of. .

"The best book ever produced about Louis Armstrong by anyone other than the man himself."―Terry Teachout, Commentary

In the early twentieth century, New Orleans was a place of colliding identities and histories, and Louis Armstrong was a gifted young man of psychological nimbleness. A dark-skinned, impoverished child, he grew up under low expectations, Jim Crow legislation, and vigilante terrorism. Yet he also grew up at the center of African American vernacular traditions from the Deep South, learning the ecstatic music of the Sanctified Church, blues played by street musicians, and the plantation tradition of ragging a tune.Louis Armstrong's New Orleans interweaves a searching account of early twentieth-century New Orleans with a narrative of the first twenty-one years of Armstrong's life. Drawing on a stunning body of first-person accounts, this book tells the rags-to-riches tale of Armstrong's early life and the social and musical forces that shaped him. The city and the musician are both extraordinary, their relationship unique, and their impact on American culture incalculable. 16 pages of illustrations
Reviews about Louis Armstrong's New Orleans (7):
Vudogal
Thomas Brothers has pulled off the near-impossible for a youngish man living in the 21st century. He has managed to dissect and explain most of the complex social and musical interactions in New Orleans as they existed in the years when Louis Armstrong was growing up, coming of age, and learning his way around the horn and the music business. He adroitly explains how the social and cultural climate of New Orleans was exactly right for not only the formation of the music we call jazz, but also how it trickled down from the uptown African-Americans to the downtown Creoles.

I only give the book four stars, however, for one reason. Mr. Brothers does not include or describe the jazz music created by Jack "Papa" Laine, Tom Brown and THEIR bands in the further downtown white districts. Laine was leading jazz bands from the mid-1890s on, and his graduates included virtually all the better-known white jazz musicians such as Nick La Rocca, Larry Shields, Eddie Edwards and Alcide "Yellow" Nunez. While it is true that the "Original" Dixieland Jazz Band claimed credit for music that was not their own, the same was true of "blues composer" W.C. Handy, whose wholesale theft of folk material was exposed by Jelly Roll Morton in 1938; of Clarence Williams, who routinely stole songs from everyone (Brothers even blithely credits him with stealing "I Wish That I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate" from Armstrong); and of Benjamin and Reb Spikes, who stole songs from EVERYBODY, black, Creole or white. As a matter of fact, the ODJB's original clarinetist, Alcide "Yellow" Nunez, even stole "Livery Stable Blues" from his former bandmates, copyrighting it under his name and that of white bandleader Vincent Lopez! So much for honor among thieves.

Despite this oversight, the book is excellent in every respect. Armstrong's development, musically, intellectually and socially, is explained in painstaking detail. (One of my few complaints is that Mr. Brothers overuses the word "hegemony" as much as Gene Santoro overuses th word "zeitgeist.") Very well written, thoroughly researched, and a full explanation of exactly "how" jazz developed, especially in New Orleans, and how this development affected the greatest early jazz soloist of them all. Highly recommended.
Xal
Best history of the origins of jazz.
Mavegar
Having known Louie for some years, this book is an fine account of a superior life and artist!
Mavivasa
It gives a great overview of the NOLA Satchmo grew up in.
Doomwarden
The book looks at the history of Louisiana, Louis Armstrong and music as a complex organism, and it was and is. Great Book.
Lamranilv
The story of Louis Armstrong's musical influences while growing up in early twentieth-century New Orleans is fascinating. The time, place and characters are vividly recreated here in fine detail. Unfortunately, this story is buried within a continuing, intrusive commentary that attempts to force the facts into the context of the author's own particular theory of the evolution of jazz. Being a professor of music, it seems he cannot resist his academic tendencies. On the one hand, this explains the exquisite scholarship: there is an extensive bibliography and 45 pages of closely-spaced footnotes to prove it. On the other hand, what could have been an engaging, enlightening narrative for anyone is rendered distant and plodding by the frequent use of arcane musical terminology and social editorializing. The personalities and events detailed here, often described in the words of contemporaries, would have been compelling enough on their own. When such passages pop up here, they shine through. A future edition that hewed closer to these direct observations and left out the commentary would probably be enjoyed by a much larger readership. In the meantime, those more interested in Armstrong's development than musical theory would probably be better served by a biography like Bergreen's or Satchmo's autobiography.
Dianalmeena
.a bit to drawn out. skimmed a lot, not a lot of narrative here, but probably useful to a certain type of reader
It is amazing, beautiful, and triumphant that African Americans, who at the beginning of the 20th-century were mostly despised by the dominant White culture and subject to wanton and homicidal violence in the South, should at the same time have created jazz -- the only original American music and which, in its origins, is essentially happy and upbeat.

In Mr. Brothers's superb new book, he examines the reasons for this aspect of jazz, as well as many other aspects. As he says in his introduction to "Louis Armstrong's New Orleans", it is not so much a biography of Satchmo as it is an attempt to place him and jazz in the historical, social, political, and musical contexts into which the man and the music were born.

Satchmo was the perfect person in the perfect place at the perfect time. The aftermath of the defeat of Reconstruction and the institution of Jim Crow laws was the impetus for 40,000 ex-slaves to flee the plantations and move to New Orleans. Among their possessions they brought their music. This music and its players fused African rhythms and tonalities with Western instruments. The old plantation bands, which were composed mostly of string instruments, began the tradition of "ragging" the tune; that is, taking the melody, breaking it apart, and riffing on it.

When this music arrived in New Orleans, it was translated into wind instruments such as the clarinet and trombone, but especially the cornet. Blues structure also developed at the same time. At the beginning of the 20th century, brass bands were flourishing in New Orleans. Buddy Bolden, a cornetist who played the blues, became the first jazz soloist. The music took off. Into this fecund world, Louis Armstrong was born (1901).

The son of a teenage mother and absent father, Louis roamed the streets of New Orleans selling newspapers, carrying the instruments of band players, and getting himself into trouble occasionally. Trouble sent him to school where he got his own instrument and emerged as a cornetist who, at the age of 14, was good enough to be a substitute in bands. By 17 he was renowned in his hometown and by his mid-twenties he had moved to Chicago as part of the Great Migration of Blacks to the north. He had come to Chicago by invitation of his cornet mentor, Joe "King" Oliver. Soon, Satch would be cutting the records -- with his Hot Five and Hot Seven bands -- that first made his reputation and then made him a planetary legend.

All of this Mr. Brothers tells in a literate, compulsively readable style. But he brings more to the table. What is crucial in his book is the understanding of the many strands of context so important to a full picture of any artist's achievement. One example: Mr. Brothers highlights how important the cornet was to the origins of jazz in New Orleans because it was a brass instrument that could be played LOUD and with dexterity. In fact, everybody who remembered Buddy Bolden remarked on the fact that he played loudly (Bolden went insane around 1907 before he could be recorded). This was important because the music mostly took place outdoors in the streets and could be heard a mile or two away. Thus audiences flocked to the bands. Of equal importance in this analysis is that jazz developed before there were automobiles; consequently, cities were quiet enough so that a band could be heard from two miles away.

Another thread of analysis Mr. Brothers foregrounds: The established Creole musicians of New Orleans. They lived downtown on the west side of Canal Street. They were of French heritage and classically trained because of it. They looked down on the "raggy" people, i.e., Blacks, who lived uptown on the other side of Canal. Eventually the Jim Crow laws caught up with the Creoles, and so there grew some empathy between the groups as outsiders trapped by White racism. This social and political dynamic eventually brought the musicians together and benefited both ethnic groups. Many Black musicians learned to read music from the Creole example, and many Creole musicians learned how to "rag time," i.e., play jazz. Sidney Bechet (note the French last name), the greatest of early jazz clarinetists, is the most famous example of a Creole jazz musician. Jelly Roll Morton may have been partly Creole as well.

There is some examination of jazz in Mr. Brothers's book that requires an understanding of very basic music theory. It is helpful to know the fairly rigid and repetitive musical structure of 12-bar blues. It is also of use to know that 4/4 "flat" time means that every beat in a 4-bar measure is of equal weight -- unlike European music in which the first and third beats are accented. Knowing what a melody is and that the heart and soul of jazz is to take the melody apart ("rag" it) is also necessary. I confess to being a musician, but still, these are minor matters, not major ones in appreciating this terrific book. Finally: One highly recommended companion to "Louis Armstrong's New Orleans", is Lee Friedlander's book of photographs, "The Jazz People of New Orleans."

Related to Louis Armstrong's New Orleans fb2 books: