» » Symbolists and Symbolism

Download Symbolists and Symbolism fb2

by Robert Delevoy

  • ISBN: 0333341309
  • Category: Photo and Art
  • Author: Robert Delevoy
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: azw lrf lit lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: MACMILLAN; 1982 Edition d' Art Albert Skira S. A., Geneva edition (1982)
  • Pages: 219 pages
  • FB2 size: 1504 kb
  • EPUB size: 1562 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 247
Download Symbolists and Symbolism fb2

Symbolists & Symbolism book.

Symbolists & Symbolism book.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. Are you sure you want to remove Symbolists and symbolism from your list? Symbolists and symbolism

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. Are you sure you want to remove Symbolists and symbolism from your list? Symbolists and symbolism. 1st paperback ed. by Robert L. Delevoy. Published 1982 by Skira, Rizzoli in Geneva, New York.

83 reproductions in full color. 228 b & w illustrations. 228 b&w illustrations. The Symbolist movement was one of the dominant forces in European art and literature from 1870 to 1900. Symbolism was less a school than the atmosphere of a period.

Symbolism and Allegory. Q: What does it mean to define, recognize, and explain?  See if you can explain what the following symbols mean: A symbol is often an event, object, person or animal to which an extraordinary meaning or significance has been attached.

Symbolism was a late nineteenth-century art movement of French, Russian and Belgian origin in poetry and other arts. In literature, the style originates with the 1857 publication of Charles Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du mal. The works of Edgar Allan Poe, which Baudelaire admired greatly and translated into French, were a significant influence and the source of many stock tropes and images. The aesthetic was developed by Stéphane Mallarmé and Paul Verlaine during the 1860s and 1870s

Symbolism in literature was a complex movement that deliberately extended the evocative power of words to express the feelings, sensations and states of mind that lie beyond everyday awareness.

Symbolism in literature was a complex movement that deliberately extended the evocative power of words to express the feelings, sensations and states of mind that lie beyond everyday awareness.

Many of the symbols included in THE UNITED SYMBOLISM OF AMERICA have become so familiar that most of us don't give them a second glance, let alone a second thought. Unfortunately, our patriotic symbols today have become so commonplace that, at best, we associate them with politicians. At worst, some believe that all American symbols are evil and Satanic. Unlike other writers on this topic, Hieronimus includes the historical background and the artistic influences behind the official design of each of these landmarks.

He is quite adept at using the words of his subjects-in journals, diaries, critical writings, and especially in their letters to one another-to underscore his points, and he quotes them generously, but - and this is a major frustration - there is not a single annotation in the entire volume.

I have used Symbolists and Symbolism by Robert L Delevoy, Legendary and Mythological Art by Clara Erskine Clement . The books of Albert Pike and . Waite on Freemasonry fall into the baggy Victorian monster category.

I have used Symbolists and Symbolism by Robert L Delevoy, Legendary and Mythological Art by Clara Erskine Clement, Hieronymus Bosch by Wilhelm Fraenger, Symbols in Christian Art by Edward Hulme, Three Lectues on Art by René Huyghe - particularly good on El Greco - The Occult in Art by Fred Gettings, The Two Children by David Ovason, Marcel Duchamp by Octavio Paz on Marcel Duchamp .


Reviews about Symbolists and Symbolism (2):
Ausstan
This is a highly idiosyncratic study, by turns appealing and informative or equally annoying and frustrating--but in general quite engaging. The author is at his best and clearest when addressing specific matters like the differences between and interrelationships among the various Symbolist groups--Les XX, La Libre Esthétique, the Munich Secession, Vienna Secession, etc.--and discussing individual artists and their works. But when he tries to relate such practical matters to their philosophical antecedents in Nietzsche, Schopenhauer and others or tries to draw syntheses from abstract concepts, his prose can become impenetrable to the point of opacity. This is annoying, because it is clear that he is as intimately acquainted with the general intellectual currents of the time as with the persons and works of the artists themselves. This is as it should be, because if there is one thing he is most keen to demonstrate, it is that Symbolism was far less a "school" or "movement" than it was an intellectual/artistic tendency, state of mind, or Zeitgeist. Mr. Delevoy has very suggestive things to say about the Symbolists' reception of figures like Wagner and Freud and their use of mythology and earlier painting, especially that of the Pre-Raphaelites. He is quite adept at using the words of his subjects--in journals, diaries, critical writings, and especially in their letters to one another--to underscore his points, and he quotes them generously, but -- and this is a major frustration -- there is not a single annotation in the entire volume. Coupled with the absence of any selected bibliography, the reader's potential quest for more information is unfortunately stymied. There is a general index combined with a "dictionary" of Symbolism so that one can get a capsule summary of an index entry along with the page references. One of the main merits of the volume is the copious illustration; the jacket text informs us that there are 228 black-and-white and eighty-three full-color illustrations, which run the range from easel paintings to photographs to many graphics from the periodicals.

The organizational principle of his book is a combination of theme and chronology, from the first chapter, entitled "The Unreality of the Image, 1870-1876," to Chapter 8, "The Space of Dream, 1900 . . .," in which we move gradually from Arnold Böcklin and Gustave Moreau to Gustav Klimt. Exactly why we start and end there and take the route we do is not determined by any inexorable logic, but by the author's eclectic view; this is probably dictated by the nature of the subject. The opening sentence of Chapter 6, "Signs in Their Proper Place, 1894-1896," is fairly indicative of his procedure: "Another account of our subject which cannot be omitted by anyone who wishes to cover the main evidence was . . ." (141). There follows discussion of the lectures on Symbolist poetry given by Ferdinand Brunetière at the Sorbonne in 1893, but what I would emphasize is that Symbolism was such a divergent, internationally widespread and encompassing tendency (that, we should remember, generally took the "Gesamtkunstwerk" as an ideal) that perhaps any study of it can do no more than hope to "cover the main evidence." There is a great deal of material here, and I learned quite a lot from this book, although I do think it could have been more informative if it had been more straightforward and less willfully eccentric. But it is unquestionably one of the more important studies of its subject and one that anyone seriously interested in Symbolism should have. As irksome as it occasionally is, I am sure that I will be returning to it from time to time, not only for its excellent illustrations but also to reconsider some of its provocative judgments and conclusions.
Naa
The illustrations are clear and well-chosen. The text includes literary and musical contributions to the movement. Many artists were introduced to me in this book, along with the usual representatives of Symbolist art.

Related to Symbolists and Symbolism fb2 books: