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by James T. Bennett

  • ISBN: 1560003855
  • Category: Other
  • Author: James T. Bennett
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Other formats: mobi txt docx rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers; 1 edition (October 31, 1998)
  • Pages: 162 pages
  • FB2 size: 1728 kb
  • EPUB size: 1314 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 179
Download The Food and Drink Police: America's Nannies, Busybodies, and Petty Tyrants fb2

If you are of a particular political persuasion and want a book that caters to your views, go for it.

James T. Bennett is professor of economics at George Mason University and a prolific author. In addition to numerous articles in academic journals, he has authored many books, eleven of which have been published by Transaction, including Subsidizing Culture, Mandate Madness, and Corporate Welfare. It doesn't take long for Bennett and DiLorenzo to lauch into their diatribes and name-calling. The second paragraph of the first chapter takes off after their arch enemny, Michael Jacobson and the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). If you are of a particular political persuasion and want a book that caters to your views, go for it. Bennett and Thomas J. DiLorenzo expose this sort of convoluted advice in The Food and Drink Police, a. .It is only about a few organizations, which are only a thin slice of "America's nannies. Quite a useless book with a misleading title. DiLorenzo expose this sort of convoluted advice in The Food and Drink Police, a timely and important contribution to the cultural debate on government and private choice. Apr 24, 2011 David Robins rated it liked it.

Bennett, James T; DiLorenzo, Thomas .

Bennett, James T; DiLorenzo, Thomas J. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. We provide complimentary e-inspection copies of primary textbooks to instructors considering our books for course adoption. Politics & International Relations. Introductory Politics. BISAC Subject Codes/Headings: POL000000. POLITICAL SCIENCE, General.

This new book from Bennett and DiLorenzo is about them-America’s nannies, busybodies, and petty tyrants, as.Another malefactor is Jeremy Rifkin, a former left-wing activist turned food nanny. Progress of all kinds worries Rifkin, but progress in food leaves him especially queasy.

This new book from Bennett and DiLorenzo is about them-America’s nannies, busybodies, and petty tyrants, as their subtitle says. We have always had nags and scolds.

Author: James Bennett Thomas DiLorenzo.

James Beard Food & Drink Cookbook Hardback Non-Fiction Books in English. James Beard Food & Drink Cooking Cookbook Hardback Non-Fiction Books. Additional site navigation.

The food & drink police. America's nannies, busybodies & petty tyrants. by James T. Bennett, James Bennett, Thomas DiLorenzo. Published 1999 by Transaction Publishers in New Brunswick.

Written in a lively, engaging style, The Food and Drink Police is a thoroughgoing examination and critique of the efforts of government agencies and private organizations (including the Center for Science in the Public Interest, Mothers Against Drunk Driving, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, and the Food and Drug Administration) to regulate the dietary habits and choices of private citizens. Irreverent, yet always informed, the authors analyze the ideological motivations, spurious science, and assaults on freedom that underlie the activities of these groups. General readers, nutritionists and scientists in general, doctors, and government policymakers will find this indispensable reading.

Chapters such as "Eat, Drink, and Keel Over: Lasagna, Egg Rolls, and Popcorn Can Kill" discuss the "evils" of multicultural cuisine and coffee, and the "good news" about junk food. In "care for a Drink?" and "None for the Road" the authors provide an in-depth look at Prohibition 1990s-style; "Glow-in-the-Dark Eggs or Anal Leakage: Pick Your Poison" provocatively fuels the current debate on fake fats and irradiated beef.

In The Pleasure Police, David Shaw quotes the psychologist and advocate of "defensive" eating, Dr. Stephen Gullo, as advising his thin-obsessed patients to "drink tomato juice before ordering" in restaurants; tomato juice, after al, is "a natural appetite suppressant." To which Shaw adds, "I assume he also advises his clients to masturbate before making love." James T. Bennett and Thomas J. DiLorenzo expose this sort of convoluted advice in The Food and Drink Police, a timely and important contribution to the cultural debate on government and private choice.


Reviews about The Food and Drink Police: America's Nannies, Busybodies, and Petty Tyrants (3):
Laizel
If you are one who thinks the government had your best interest at heart when it took on the cigarette industry, you need to read this book because you'll find out here that the federal tobacco wars were only the beginning. Sugar, salt, fat, wine, beer, distilled spirits, and beef are all on the chopping block of federal nannies who want only what is best for us. And it's all "for the children." Bennett and Dilorenzo make an important contribution to the national debate over what role--if any--the federal government should play in providing for the happiness which Americans derive from their personal choices of food and drink. The authors skewer federal bureaucrats and their private sector "non-profit" cronies who use taxpayer money to try forcing their own self-righteous world views on all citizens. They show with bitter humor that prohibitions on food and drink will follow in the wake of recent success against tobacco companies. I'll put this slim, entertaining, alarming volume right up there with James Bovard's Lost Rights as a book which thoughtful Americans should read. If citizens don't start reining in their representatives in D.C., the executive branch bureaucrats will be free to continue spending our tax dollars to make us all miserable. And thin. And free of alcohol, beef, and pleasure. An important book.
Shem
I expected a lot more in the way of serious and thoughtful scholarship from two economics professors. Unfortunately, the constant ad hominem attacks and (almost) witty zingers directed at people the authors obviously don't like make it hard to take this book seriously.

It doesn't take long for Bennett and DiLorenzo to lauch into their diatribes and name-calling. The second paragraph of the first chapter takes off after their arch enemny, Michael Jacobson and the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). Right away CSPI and their allies are the "nutrition Nazis." They then pretend to know what Jacobson's motivition is - "a desire for control of other people's lives." And then (p4), they refer to Jacobson as a "nut." It goes on.

The authors slam one of the members of the CSPI board, actress Anne Bancroft, by claiming she should know something about junk food because she is "married to the slovenly slapstick comedian Mel Brooks." Sure, attack a relative instead of addressing the issue. They later try to give credence to the view that artificial flavorings are really good for us and may explain the falling rate of heart disease - well, why not? Maybe my doctor should prescribe a case of Twinkies for me. (Sorry, I'm doing exactly what the authors have done - resorting to sarcasm instead of reason.)

The ultra-conservative bent of the authors comes through loudest and clearest when they discuss the role of greed: "...it is precisely the greed of business people that is the surest guarantor of even safer and healthier products." Gordon Gecko lives. Those who brought down the the economy thorugh unfettered greed should be deemed heroes, not villains?

If you are of a particular political persuasion and want a book that caters to your views, go for it. But if you want to read something that is serious and thoughtful about an important topic, run. One could rationally criticize what CSPI and other similar groups are doing. But Bennett and DiLorenzo would rather show how clever they can be in putting down those with whom they disagree rather than seriously address the real issues.
Kulafyn
The authors provide no evidence or scientific basis for anything they claim. They engage in personal attacks only. They propose that greed is the very thing that will lead to innovation and top quality products. Really? So cigarettes are a top quality product?

Don't waste you money on this moronic book.

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