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by Philip J. Cook

  • ISBN: 0691125201
  • Category: Other
  • Author: Philip J. Cook
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Other formats: doc docx lit txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (August 5, 2007)
  • Pages: 280 pages
  • FB2 size: 1867 kb
  • EPUB size: 1885 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 595
Download Paying the Tab: The Costs and Benefits of Alcohol Control fb2

Paying the Tab makes a powerful case for a policy course correction Paying the Tab, the first comprehensive analysis of this complex policy issue, calls for broadening our approach to curbing destructive drinking

Paying the Tab makes a powerful case for a policy course correction. Paying the Tab, the first comprehensive analysis of this complex policy issue, calls for broadening our approach to curbing destructive drinking. Over the last few decades, efforts to reduce the societal costs-curbing youth drinking and cracking down on drunk driving-have been somewhat effective, but woefully incomplete. In fact, American policymakers have ignored the influence of the supply side of the equation.

Philip Cook's book, Paying the Tab, is an excellent book for academics, policy analysts, and graduate students to use as a. .

Philip Cook's book, Paying the Tab, is an excellent book for academics, policy analysts, and graduate students to use as a primary source on . Cook sets precedence for all other authors who write on substance abuse policy should follow. He provides both an in-depth analysis of one drug by examining it through historical, economic and social viewpoints. -Dwight Vick, International Journal of Drug Policy. It is certain to become a landmark in the fields of health, economic, and public policy.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. A brief history of the supply side The alcoholism movement Drinking : a primer Prices and quantities Alcohol control as injury prevention Long term effects : hearts and minds The drinker's bonus Evaluating interventions Regulating supply Taxing the alcohol industry Youth as a special case Alcohol control policy for the twenty-first century. Rubrics: Alcoholism Government policy United States Prevention Alcoholic beverages Taxation. Download now Paying the tab : the costs and benefits of alcohol control Philip J. Cook.

Every American is paying for alcohol abuse. Paying the Tab, the first comprehensive analysis of this complex policy issue, calls for broadening our approach to curbing destructive drinking

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Every American is paying for alcohol abuse.

In Paying the Tab, Philip J. Cook offers a compre-. hensive historical, economic, and public policy. Cook scours the literature in. this terrain and argues fervently that higher taxes. on alcohol would improve health and safety and. perspective on alcohol control policies of the past. His main message is that American.

Paying the Tab, the first comprehensive analysis of this complex policy issue, calls for broadening our approach to curbing destructive drinking.

Philip J. Cook: Paying the Tab. is published by Princeton University Press . A number of these pioneers published. control has focused on these issues. The fate of alcohol control contrasts.

No part of this book may be reproduced in any form. a brief, elegant book in 1975 with sponsorship from the World Health. markedly with the recent success of advocates promoting tobacco control.

Every American is paying for alcohol abuse

Every American is paying for alcohol abuse.

Cook argues that American policymakers have failed to adequately consider the supply-side policies such as higher excise taxes that could be used to reduce the health and economic consequences of alcohol misuse and abuse

Cook argues that American policymakers have failed to adequately consider the supply-side policies such as higher excise taxes that could be used to reduce the health and economic consequences of alcohol misuse and abuse. He offers a justification for the use of government power to alter the behavior of individuals. Though thought-provoking and thorough, the book would have benefited from a deeper exploration of financial incentives and an analysis of alcohol policies in other countries. Still, it is clear that more must be done to control the consumption of alcohol.

What drug provides Americans with the greatest pleasure and the greatest pain? The answer, hands down, is alcohol. The pain comes not only from drunk driving and lost lives but also addiction, family strife, crime, violence, poor health, and squandered human potential. Young and old, drinkers and abstainers alike, all are affected. Every American is paying for alcohol abuse.

Paying the Tab, the first comprehensive analysis of this complex policy issue, calls for broadening our approach to curbing destructive drinking. Over the last few decades, efforts to reduce the societal costs--curbing youth drinking and cracking down on drunk driving--have been somewhat effective, but woefully incomplete. In fact, American policymakers have ignored the influence of the supply side of the equation. Beer and liquor are far cheaper and more readily available today than in the 1950s and 1960s.

Philip Cook's well-researched and engaging account chronicles the history of our attempts to "legislate morality," the overlooked lessons from Prohibition, and the rise of Alcoholics Anonymous. He provides a thorough account of the scientific evidence that has accumulated over the last twenty-five years of economic and public-health research, which demonstrates that higher alcohol excise taxes and other supply restrictions are effective and underutilized policy tools that can cut abuse while preserving the pleasures of moderate consumption. Paying the Tab makes a powerful case for a policy course correction. Alcohol is too cheap, and it's costing all of us.


Reviews about Paying the Tab: The Costs and Benefits of Alcohol Control (6):
KiddenDan
“Alcohol abuse remains our leading ‘drug’ problem,” writes Philip J. Cook. But our presidents never identify alcohol as the drug that causes the most harm to society. Americans support using taxes and other regulations to curb smoking, but there is an aversion to using such policies to curb alcohol abuse. Cook attributes that aversion to the aftereffects of Prohibition.

A professor of public policy and economics at Duke University, Cook is a veteran in researching and writing about alcohol and public policy. His book surveys decades of research in explaining how much excess drinking costs society, and which policies work and which don’t to curb the harm.

The cost to society, aka the “bar tab,” is “much larger than it needs to be or should be.” One reason is that the cost of alcoholic beverages has declined in constant dollars since the 1950s. That’s because the federal excise tax on alcohol in the 1950s, in inflation adjusted dollars, was more than six times as high as it is today. The excise tax is based upon volume, not value, and the tax has been raised only once since 1951.

The research is clear that a higher “user fee” would save lives while imposing most of the cost on the ten percent of drinkers who consume the most alcohol. There is no question that price increases for cigarettes reduce sales and underage smoking. That happens even though almost all smokers are dependent, compared to perhaps one in ten drinkers. Prices matter with alcohol as well. When prices are cut in half at a happy hour, both casual and heavy drinkers quaff twice as much.

The alcohol industry is aware that higher taxes reduce sales, which is why the industry lobbies so tenaciously against tax hikes. The research shows that young people are particularly price sensitive. “Contrary to conventional wisdom, prices even matter for chronic heavy drinkers...The evidence supporting the public health benefits of increased alcohol taxes is every bit as strong as for cigarette taxes.”

Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop recognized that the social costs of alcohol abuse far exceed the declining value of the excise taxes. Consequently, he “strongly recommended” a nickel a drink increase in the alcohol user fee. The evidence suggests that a nickel a drink increase would reduce consumption by 12 percent, motor vehicle deaths by 7 percent, suicides by 6 percent and the cirrhosis death rate by 32 percent.

Another reason for the big bar tab is that public policy is mainly used to address only one source of harm from excess drinking, namely DUI. As a result, DUI has declined markedly since the early 1980s. But the alcohol problem is not limited to the highways, and other harms get neglected. Among those are suicide, the transmission of STDs, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. One more is from violence that occurs in barroom brawls, date rape, domestic battery and murder. Drinking is involved in at least two out of five injury deaths.

When it comes to tobacco, the public recognizes that availability matters. Consequently, cigarette vending machines were eliminated, and tobacco ads were taken off the air. The public is doubtful, however, that such regulations would work with alcohol. Cook’s review of the research finds that availability does matter: “A ten percent increase in per capita drinking is associated with a 5 percent increase in homicide and suicide, a 9 or 10 percent increase in accidents, and a 15 percent increase in cirrhosis deaths.”

The reformers who abolished Prohibition, such as John D. Rockefeller, Jr., advocated a variety of controls on drinking to prevent abuse. He recommended state monopolies for distribution and retail sales in order to eliminate the private profit motive, and with it the motive to stimulate sales and increase intemperance. Seventeen states did adopt a monopoly system of wholesale distribution for liquor though some included wine as well.

The Illinois Liquor Control Act of 1934, which is still on the books, reflects that Rockefeller attitude by explicitly advocating moderation: “This Act shall be liberally construed, to the end that the health, safety, and welfare of the People of the State of Illinois shall be protected and temperance in the consumption of alcoholic liquors shall be fostered and promoted by sound and careful control and regulation of the manufacture, sale, and distribution of alcoholic liquors.”

Interesting facts:
• The whiskey tax was the first internal revenue measure imposed by the first Congress in 1791. It was advocated by Alexander Hamilton, who contended the liquor tax would produce adequate revenue as well as encourage moderation.

• The whiskey tax was replaced as the main source of federal revenue when the Sixteenth Amendment passed in 1916 authorizing the income tax. Thus the Sixteenth Amendment made possible the 18th Amendment for Prohibition.

• Though Prohibition was a political failure, it nevertheless resulted in a substantial reduction in consumption, particularly of beer.

• After the repeal of Prohibition, bootleggers continued to supply 45 million gallons per year until enforcement was ramped up and deflated the black market within four years.

• If the top ten percent who drink the most could reduce their consumption to that of the next highest drinking decile, then alcohol sales would drop by 60 percent.

• Opponents of raising the alcohol user fee call it a regressive tax, even though the heaviest drinkers would pay most of it, while teetotalers wouldn’t be affected, and light drinkers would hardly notice. Besides, alcohol is not a necessity, like food or electricity, and people of modest means could avoid paying more by reducing how much they drink.

• When it comes to the age-21 laws, the allure of forbidden fruit exists. But research shows that those laws have the overall effect of reducing the likelihood minors will drink and abuse alcohol.

“Alcohol is the source of great enjoyment and also great harm.” Cook makes a persuasive case that the social costs can be significantly reduced without infringing on the enjoyment, by employing effective public policies to reduce the harm.. ###
Negal
Author Philip J. Cook really knows what he is talking about. He presents data showing (among other things) that the alcohol industry makes most of its sales to very heavy drinkers - many of whom are likely alcoholics. The average consumption in this group is 74 drinks per week. So the foundation upon which the alcohol industry rests is, shockingly, addiction and alcohol abuse. Big Alcohol is essentially following in the footsteps of Big Tobacco. The author carefully reviews ways of curbing the damage caused by alcohol. A book well worth reading.
Jube
This book was a textbook in one of my wife's college classes. I decided to thumb through it, if for nothing else, casual curiosity. However, once I started reading it, the text drew me in, and I ended up surprising myself by flipping electronic pages until presented the five-star lottery. Cook's analysis is both thorough and interesting. Read it yourself and decide.
Sharpbinder
thank you. Very nice.
Shadowbourne
This careful study, clearly written, explores and analyzes the social science literature of alcohol control in the United States since the repeal of Prohibition in 1933. The author explains the social costs of alcohol use and, especially, misuse as scientists have come to understand the subject. Professor Cook examines public policy toward alcoholic beverages, including their taxation. The relative costs of alcoholic beverages for the consumer have declined, especially since the 1950s, because of structural changes in the industries that supply them (especially in the brewing industry) and of the industries that distribute them. Those costs have also declined because of public policy decisions, including decisions to lower the effective rate of taxation as Americans have experienced inflation. The result, Cook concludes, is that the social costs of alcohol misuse are not covered by the tax revenues gained form the sales of alcoholic beverages.
Uthergo
Major typo on page 18 which incorrectly states the effective date of the Volstead Act as January 16, 2000. The correct date is January 16, 1920.

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