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by Theodor Adorno

  • ISBN: 0415271002
  • Category: Other
  • Author: Theodor Adorno
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Other formats: docx mbr txt rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 2 edition (November 23, 2001)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • FB2 size: 1283 kb
  • EPUB size: 1329 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 639
Download The Stars Down to Earth (Routledge Classics) (Volume 113) fb2

When Adorno prepared the book for its original publication in 1964, he was well aware of how much the jargon had come to permeate every space of our culture

When Adorno prepared the book for its original publication in 1964, he was well aware of how much the jargon had come to permeate every space of our culture. Adorno's critique is a rigorously philosophical one-executed in accordance with the critical categories of the Frankfurt School and his own daring Neo-Marxist application of them.

Theodor W. Adorno (/əˈdɔːrnoʊ/; German: ; born Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund; September 11, 1903 – August 6, 1969) was a German philosopher, sociologist, psychologist, musicologist, and composer known for his critical theory of so. . Adorno (/əˈdɔːrnoʊ/; German: ; born Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund; September 11, 1903 – August 6, 1969) was a German philosopher, sociologist, psychologist, musicologist, and composer known for his critical theory of society

Paperback, 176 pages.

Adorno argues that the column promotes psychological dependency and social conformism in much the same way as fascist propaganda. Paperback, 176 pages. Published December 21st 1994 by Routledge (first published 1975). This volume also includes some excellent short essays on anti-Semitism and For anyone who reads horoscopes, this is a brilliant Freudo-Marxist reading of the forces at work whenever we look to the newspaper for a hint at our future successes.

Haunted by the ugly side of American culture industries he used the different angles provided by each of these three essays to showcase the dangers inherent in modern obsessions with consumption. He engages with some of his most enduring themes in this seminal collection, focusing on the irrational in mass culture - from astrology to new age cults, from anti-semitism to the power of neo-fascist propaganda.

Originally published: London ; New York : Routledge, 1994. Includes bibliographical references and index. Theodor Adorno was one of the giants of twentieth-century thought. This volume presents four of his key writings on the irrational in mass culture : From Astrology to Fascism ; from anti-Semitism to to the Occult.

By (author) Theodor Adorno. About Theodor Adorno. Theodor Adorno (1903 - 1969). Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Place of Publication. German philosopher who was a leading member of the Frankfurt School. Country of Publication. Foreword by. Stephan Crook.

Categories: nonfiction, sociology. ISBN 13: 9780203519844. org to approved e-mail addresses.

Stephan Crook's introduction grounds Adorno's arguments firmly in the present where extreme religious and political organizations are commonplace - so commonplace in fact that often we deem them unworthy of our attention. Half a century ago Theodore Adorno not only recognised the dangers, but proclaimed them loudly. We did not listen then. Maybe it is not too late to listen now.

The Stars Down to Earth shows us a stunningly prescient Adorno. Haunted by the ugly side of American culture industries he used the different angles provided by each of these three essays to showcase the dangers inherent in modern obsessions with consumption. He engages with some of his most enduring themes in this seminal collection, focusing on the irrational in mass culture - from astrology to new age cults, from anti-semitism to the power of neo-fascist propaganda. He points out that the modern state and market forces serve the interest of capital in its basic form. Stephan Crook's introduction grounds Adorno's arguments firmly in the present where extreme religious and political organizations are commonplace - so commonplace in fact that often we deem them unworthy of our attention. Half a century ago Theodore Adorno not only recognised the dangers, but proclaimed them loudly. We did not listen then. Maybe it is not too late to listen now.
Reviews about The Stars Down to Earth (Routledge Classics) (Volume 113) (5):
Era
Adorno brings his considerable intellect to bear on a seemingly trivial subject -- Astrology -- but it is valuable to go through this exercise on how mass culture provides ways of coping with complexity. Adorno's is ultimately an empathic approach these issues. Since he is a central figure in the tradition of critical theory, he of course looks at astrology as a modern reincarnation of ancient tropes that used to serve humankind but are now irrevocably lost. It is a corrupted remnant of what used to be absolutely true for humans. Modern astrology becomes quasi-scientific, muddled in "facts" and generally lives in a world of plausible deniability, and a mingling of personal agency with deterministic celestial commands to take the edge off the heavy burden of being a lone individual in mass society. In short, it is symptomatic of our long, continuing crisis of modernity.
spacebreeze
Theodor W. Adorno (1903–1969) was a German sociologist, philosopher and musicologist who was also a leading member of the Frankfurt School. He wrote other books such as Dialectic of Enlightenment,Negative Dialectics,Prisms, etc.

The Editor’s Introduction to this posthumously-published book states, “This volume brings together four texts written by Theodor Adorno between the late 1930s and the mid-1950s. The longest, ‘The Stars Down to Earth’ is for the most part a content analysis of an astrology column in the Los Angeles Times which Adorno wrote in 1952-3 during a return visit to the United States from Germany… The title of the final piece, ‘Anti-Semitism and Fascist Propaganda’ explains its topic clearly enough. Published in 1946, the paper draws extensively on a much longer study which Adorno had written in 1943, but which was not published in his lifetime.” (Pg. 1)

In the essay on astrology, he says, “It pretends to a higher level of scientificness than the supposedly more primitive forms of esoteric wisdom without, however, entering into the argument itself: the lack of a transparent interconnection between astronomical observations and inferences pertaining to the fate of individuals or nations… Astrology attempts to get away from crude and unpopular fatalism by establishing outward forces operating on the individual’s decision, including the individual’s own character, but leaves the ultimate choice to him… Astrology undertakes the constant encouragement of people to take decisions, no matter how inconsequential they may be. It is practically directed towards action in spite of all the lofty talk about cosmic secrets and profound meditation. Thus, the very gesture of astrology, its basic presumption that everyone has to make up his mind at every moment falls in line with what will later come out with respect to the specific content of astrological counseling: its leaning towards extroversion.” (Pg. 44)

Later, he adds, “the column tends to reinforce guilt feelings, compulsive patterns and various other unconscious motivations instead of working against them. It tends to make the socially dependent even more dependent psychologically.” (Pg. 105) He asserts, “astrology mirrors exactly the opaqueness of the empirical world and implies so little transcendent faith, is so opaque itself that it can be easily accepted by supposedly skeptical, disillusioned people. The intellectual attitude it is expressive of is one of disoriented agnosticism. The cult of God has been replaced by the cult of facts, just as the fatal entities of astrology, the stars, are themselves viewed as facts, things, ruled by mechanical laws. One could not grasp the specificity of astrology and of the whole frame of mind it stands for if one would simply call it a reversion to older states of metaphysics: what it is characteristic of is the transfiguration of a world of things into quasi-metaphysical powers.” (Pg. 116)

He observes, “During the so-called enlightened era of the last 200 years, no stratum of the population has been free from anti-Semitism.” (Pg. 142)

After quoting Fr. Charles Coughlin, he comments, “The transformation of Christian doctrine into slogans of political violence could not be cruder than in this passage… The actual shedding of blood is advocated as necessary because the world has supposedly been redeemed by the shedding of Christ’s blood. Murder is invested with the halo of a sacrament… Psychologically, all fascist propaganda is simply a system of such symbols.” (Pg. 170)

This is clearly not one of Adorno’s “major works”; but he comments on subjects that he does not treat elsewhere in his better-known works.
Onath
Theodor W. Adorno (1903–1969) was a German sociologist, philosopher and musicologist who was also a leading member of the Frankfurt School. He wrote other books such as Dialectic of Enlightenment,Negative Dialectics,Prisms, etc.

The Editor’s Introduction to this posthumously-published book states, “This volume brings together four texts written by Theodor Adorno between the late 1930s and the mid-1950s. The longest, ‘The Stars Down to Earth’ is for the most part a content analysis of an astrology column in the Los Angeles Times which Adorno wrote in 1952-3 during a return visit to the United States from Germany… The title of the final piece, ‘Anti-Semitism and Fascist Propaganda’ explains its topic clearly enough. Published in 1946, the paper draws extensively on a much longer study which Adorno had written in 1943, but which was not published in his lifetime.” (Pg. 1)

In the essay on astrology, he says, “It pretends to a higher level of scientificness than the supposedly more primitive forms of esoteric wisdom without, however, entering into the argument itself: the lack of a transparent interconnection between astronomical observations and inferences pertaining to the fate of individuals or nations… Astrology attempts to get away from crude and unpopular fatalism by establishing outward forces operating on the individual’s decision, including the individual’s own character, but leaves the ultimate choice to him… Astrology undertakes the constant encouragement of people to take decisions, no matter how inconsequential they may be. It is practically directed towards action in spite of all the lofty talk about cosmic secrets and profound meditation. Thus, the very gesture of astrology, its basic presumption that everyone has to make up his mind at every moment falls in line with what will later come out with respect to the specific content of astrological counseling: its leaning towards extroversion.” (Pg. 44)

Later, he adds, “the column tends to reinforce guilt feelings, compulsive patterns and various other unconscious motivations instead of working against them. It tends to make the socially dependent even more dependent psychologically.” (Pg. 105) He asserts, “astrology mirrors exactly the opaqueness of the empirical world and implies so little transcendent faith, is so opaque itself that it can be easily accepted by supposedly skeptical, disillusioned people. The intellectual attitude it is expressive of is one of disoriented agnosticism. The cult of God has been replaced by the cult of facts, just as the fatal entities of astrology, the stars, are themselves viewed as facts, things, ruled by mechanical laws. One could not grasp the specificity of astrology and of the whole frame of mind it stands for if one would simply call it a reversion to older states of metaphysics: what it is characteristic of is the transfiguration of a world of things into quasi-metaphysical powers.” (Pg. 116)

He observes, “During the so-called enlightened era of the last 200 years, no stratum of the population has been free from anti-Semitism.” (Pg. 142)

After quoting Fr. Charles Coughlin, he comments, “The transformation of Christian doctrine into slogans of political violence could not be cruder than in this passage… The actual shedding of blood is advocated as necessary because the world has supposedly been redeemed by the shedding of Christ’s blood. Murder is invested with the halo of a sacrament… Psychologically, all fascist propaganda is simply a system of such symbols.” (Pg. 170)

This is clearly not one of Adorno’s “major works”; but he comments on subjects that he does not treat elsewhere in his better-known works.
Thetalen
Studies demonstrating Adorno's 'authoritarian personality' conceptual model. His fascinating analysis of the LA Times astrology column demonstrates the power and mechanisms of primitive belief forms in modern society. I would say the very reaction of the person who gave this book one star because they didn't realize it was a critique of astrology (LOL) rather shows Adorno hit a nerve! The reader is sure to recognize the entirely contemporary propaganda techniques of the right-wingnut media in Adorno's razor-sharp insights. Alone making the book a worthy addition to one's shelf is the accompanying essay on Anti-Semitism; an absolute must-read. The introductory materials are furthermore top notch and very helpful.

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