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by Victor S. Johnston

  • ISBN: 0738203165
  • Category: Other
  • Author: Victor S. Johnston
  • Subcategory: Science & Mathematics
  • Other formats: doc lit mbr docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (April 7, 2000)
  • Pages: 220 pages
  • FB2 size: 1816 kb
  • EPUB size: 1513 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 540
Download Why We Feel: The Science of Human Emotions (Helix Books) fb2

Victor S. Johnston received his P. from the University of Edinburgh. The 1st chapter in this book is entitled 'The Grand Illusion

Victor S. He is currently Professor of Biopsychology at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces. The 1st chapter in this book is entitled 'The Grand Illusion.

Why do we get angry? Anxious? In this intriguing book, biopsychologist Victor Johnston explores the origins of human emotions

Why do we get angry? Anxious? In this intriguing book, biopsychologist Victor Johnston explores the origins of human emotions. Drawing on computer science, neurobiology, and evolutionary psychology, he shows us that emotions are not some strange accident of nature, but are instead the basis of learning an Why do we think some people are beautiful? Why do orgasms feel good? Why do we get angry? Anxious?

In this intriguing book, biopsychologist Victor Johnston explores the origins of human emotions

In this intriguing book, biopsychologist Victor Johnston explores the origins of human emotions.

Download books for free. An excellent study draws new connections between emotions and intelligence. Download (pdf, 2. 3 Mb) Donate Read.

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This book describes the stories of 25 emerging South African young female scientists as a means to inspire young girls and women in South Africa. It tells stories of how young women scientists have overcome a wide spectrum of obstacles to obtain their PhD degree, and embark on successful careers, and who are engaged in science for society work. The aim of this book is to give the non-specialist a feel for the science and technology that underpin a truly international beverage. As such it is is a perfect combination of an interesting topic and excellent science. Almost every chemistry teacher will find examples to use in class.

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HELIX BOOKS PERSEUS PUBLISHING Cambridge, Massachusetts. Why We Feel is an adventure story about the evolution of human feelings, and how they have become woven into the fabric of our brain. Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. It is a story about consciousness, emotions, free will, learning, memory, reasoning, ethics, aesthetics, and the enormous creative potential that has been bestowed upon us by our ancestral history. I hope that you enjoy the journey.

Biopsychologist Victor Johnston explores the origins of human emotions.

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Biopsychologist Victor Johnston explores the origins of human emotions. Drawing on computer science, neurobiology, and evolutionary psychology, he argues that emotions are not an accident of nature, but are instead the basis of learning and reasoning, and help us to adapt to a complex, rapidly changing environment. In the process, he offers a new view of reality - what we see, hear, smell and feel is not an accurate representation of the world around us; rather, our feelings are illusions, shaped by millions of years of evolution.
Reviews about Why We Feel: The Science of Human Emotions (Helix Books) (7):
Thetahuginn
I thought this book was going to talk more about specific emotions and why they are necessary for evolution and survival. It's actually a technical cog-sci evolution book, and somewhat disappointing. The last chapter summarizes what Johnston says in a complicated, redundant way for the rest of the book. The strong points are: his explanations of evolutionary opportunism, how evolution works, his "face prints" computer program, and the various computer models that simulate selection and genetics. His thesis is that the brain structures that allow emotions have evolved because they aided survival and thus gene reproduction. The feelings we have today were therefore necessary in ancestral environments, though not necessarily in modern environments. He also discusses the role of learning (which allows us to adapt to changing environments). Also interesting, his presentation of sensations and emotions, not as realities in the outside world (there is no "redness", only light waves), but as brain-created realities which don't necessarily mirror reality accurately, but in fact amplify some things to aid survival. I wonder if Jared Diamond does it better in The Third Chimpanzee?
tamada
Important and interesting research.
Dusar
Good book.
Silly Dog
The 1st chapter in this book is entitled 'The Grand Illusion.' This is not some pessimistic assessment of the human condition, like we've all been fooling ourselves for naught all the long; this is merely the same caveat that the likes of the ancient Buhddists, the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (himself often accused of pessimism), and modern science writer Torr Norretranders have also elucidated: namely, we're sort of idealistic in how we process what we perceive to be the external (and internal) world. It's not so very egregious that we're like a bunch of asylum escapees, hallucinating some vastly inaccurate version of a reality we can never hope to know, it's just that neither are we ice cold observers of an objectively understandable interaction between our organismal selves and reality. It's a subtle distinction but one well worth knowing. Dr. Johnston does such a good job of delineating this concept that I had to rate this book the maximum of 5 stars. It is even more germane that he does so in the context of evolutionary psychology by stating that we, evolved primates that we are, did not nor did we need to evolve an ability to perceive and understand reality directly; that would have been nice and all, but what we did, and by virtue of it having happened, what we needed to accomplish was some means by which to survive and leave offspring in the field (remember, the way things are is no endorsement of any normative value for or against). Not only do we perceive and process reality in very creative ways, but we also color the heck out of it to squeeze the maximum utility out of it, hence, sugar (high quality nutrient) is sweet and good, and sharp teeth and gutteral growling sounds (the theme of not a few scary, supernatural movies) are bad, nay, downright evil! Thus, by the very acts of perceiving and cognizing, do we add and embellish hedonic tone to our experience. In general, this book is a good cummulative grouping of modern cognitive science research findings sans the fluff. It's too bad Daniel Dennett has already claimed the title "Consciousness Explained" and Steven Pinker "How the Mind Works." Either title would have suited Dr. Johnston's work very well.
Akirg
The core of this book is a few chapters on the evolutionary benefit of emotion. I found the theory rich and convincing, and the writing clear; the theory explains, for example, why one emotion (positive or negative) evolved into multiple emotions, each related to a different aspect of gene survival, such as satisfying hunger, finding a mate, etc. Johnston's theory of emotion is a special application of a more general theory of consciousness. The rest of the book is kind of a grab bag. Johnston devotes too much space to refuting an alternative theory of human consciousness which he never adequately explains, and I suspect he is creating a straw man to argue against. There are a few chapters devoted to Johnson's own simulations and special interests, and a quick review of evolutionary processes in general. The review may be too quick for the unfamiliar reader. The simulations involve genetic algorithms and neural networks. I found the discussion of the former clear, but I was already familiar with the topic. I am also somewhat familiar with neural networks, and the book is inadequate here: Johnson seems to despair of explaining neural networks in a simple way, so kind of assumes the reader already understands them. Outside of his special areas of expertise, Johnson may be prone to error. Certainly, he is unaware of all the research on the socialization skills of primates, and I suspect that some of his statements on early child development are overly simplified.. All in all, this was a five star book for me, but it may not be for others with different backgrounds, either because they know less than me, or know more than me.

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