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by James L. Peck

  • ISBN: 1558495371
  • Category: Other
  • Author: James L. Peck
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Other formats: rtf docx lrf lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press; annotated edition (September 26, 2006)
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • FB2 size: 1336 kb
  • EPUB size: 1201 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 132
Download Washington's China: The National Security World, the Cold War, and the Origins of Globalism (Culture, Politics, and the Cold War) fb2

This book addresses a central question about the Cold War that has never . by James L. Peck (Author).

This book addresses a central question about the Cold War that has never been adequately resolved. Why did the United States go to such lengths not merely to contain the People's Republic of China but to isolate it from all diplomatic.

Washington's China book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Washington's China book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Washington's China: The National Security World, the Cold War, and the Origins of Globalism as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Why did the United States go to such lengths not merely to "contain" the People's Republic of China but to isolate it from all diplomatic, cultural, and economic ties to other nations?

This book addresses a central question about the Cold War that has never been adequately resolved.

Series: Culture, Politics, and the Cold Wa.

Published by: University of Massachusetts Press. Coming from an educated upper-middle-class moderate Republican family, I was not particularly critical of Kennedy’s policies at first. Yet I had been uneasy with the militant Cold War tone of his presidential campaign-so uneasy that at the age of sixteen I had stuffed envelopes for Richard Nixon at the local Republican campaign headquarters.

Nuclear Freeze in a Cold War The Reagan Administration . Washington's China The National Security World, the Cold War, and the Origins o. .

Nuclear Freeze in a Cold War The Reagan Administration, Cultural Activism, and the End of the Arms Race. William M. Knoblauch. Redefining Science Scientists, the National Security State, and Nuclear Weapons in Cold War America. In Whose Eyes The Memoir of a Vietnamese Filmmaker in War and Peace. Tran Van Thuy and Le Thanh Dung. The End of Victory Culture Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation. Washington's China The National Security World, the Cold War, and the Origins of Globalism.

Washington's China : The National Security World, the Cold War, and the Origins of Globalism. Part of the Culture and Politics in the Cold War and Beyond Series).

The Cold War was reflected in culture through music, movies, books, television and other media, as well as sports and social beliefs and behavior. One major element of the Cold War was the threat of a nuclear war; another was espionage

The Cold War was reflected in culture through music, movies, books, television and other media, as well as sports and social beliefs and behavior. One major element of the Cold War was the threat of a nuclear war; another was espionage. Many works use the Cold War as a backdrop, or directly take part in fictional conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union. The period 1953–62 saw Cold War themes first enter the mainstream culture as a public preoccupation

During the early Cold War era, Democrats were generally supportive of increased military spending, while . Hogan, Michael (1998) A Cross of Iron: Harry S. Truman and the Origins of the National Security State, 1945–1954. New York: Cambridge University Press

During the early Cold War era, Democrats were generally supportive of increased military spending, while Republicans were critical. After the mid-1960s, Democrats increasingly tended to oppose larger military budgets, while Republicans more often favored them. This article presents evidence about the process through which this change took place. New York: Cambridge University Press. Holsti, Ole R. (1998–99) A widening gap between the . military and civilian society? International Security 23: 5–42.

This book addresses a central question about the Cold War that has never been adequately resolved. Why did the United States go to such lengths not merely to "contain" the People's Republic of China but to isolate it from all diplomatic, cultural, and economic ties to other nations? Why, in other words, was American policy more hostile to China than to the Soviet Union, at least until President Nixon visited China in 1972?The answer, as set out here, lies in the fear of China's emergence as a power capable of challenging the new Asian order the United States sought to shape in the wake of World War II. To meet this threat, American policymakers fashioned an ideology that was not simply or exclusively anticommunist, but one that aimed at creating an integrated, cooperative world capitalism under U.S. leadership―an ideology, in short, designed to outlive the Cold War.In building his argument, James Peck draws on a wide variety of little-known documents from the archives of the National Security Council and the CIA. He shows how American ofcials initially viewed China as a "puppet" of the Soviet Union, then as "independent junior partner" in a Sino-Soviet bloc, andnally as "revolutionary model" and sponsor of social upheaval in the Third World. Each of these constructs revealed more about U.S. perceptions and strategic priorities than about actual shifts in Chinese thought and conduct. All were based on the assumption that China posed a direct threat not just to specic U.S. interests and objectives abroad but to the larger vision of a new global order dominated by American economic and military power. Although the nature of "Washington's China" may have changed over the years, Peck contends that the ideology behind it remains unchanged, even today.
Reviews about Washington's China: The National Security World, the Cold War, and the Origins of Globalism (Culture, Politics, and the Cold War) (2):
The Rollers of Vildar
This should be required reading for every U.S. citizen. This is about so much more than our relationship with China. It is about how those in control of power in our country outside of the democratic scrutiny, engineer a society they prefer. Knowing that it would probably not meet with the general citizenry's approval, they not only operate in secrecy, but pull out all the stops to keep the electorate in the dark, including lying and misrepresentation. It's systematic, based on reams of National Security documents, offering quotes of every American foreign diplomat you could have ever heard of. Highly recommend.
Shalinrad
I am torn between giving this book a three or four star review. Peck's argument centers around how Washington saw the division between the Soviet Union and Communist China. However, I am not sure if Peck offers an argument. Instead, he tracks the US National Security Council perspectives on how China would emerge if it continued down its path of nationalism. He offers commentator and arguments from George Kennan, but Peck's analysis seems to come up short. That being said, the book reads well from a historical aspect. Readers who want to know the mindset of Washington as they watched the Soviet Union falter in keeping China under their imperialist thumb would find this book interesting; Peck hones on to the late 1940s-1960s. I think Peck stops short of not including a chapter on President Nixon's rapprochement with China; he ends with the Johnson administration. This would have better contributed to Peck's argument of China's origins of globalism (as stated in the title of the book). Overall, this book was worth the read, but I am hesitant on offering my recommendation as it left me wanting more.

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