» » Spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy)

Download Spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy) fb2

by Spinoza,Jonathan Israel,Michael Silverthorne

  • ISBN: 0521824117
  • Category: Other
  • Author: Spinoza,Jonathan Israel,Michael Silverthorne
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Other formats: mbr rtf lit txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (May 28, 2007)
  • Pages: 330 pages
  • FB2 size: 1569 kb
  • EPUB size: 1905 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 447
Download Spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy) fb2

Spinoza's l Treatise (1670) is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period. This is a very important work in the history of enlightened beliefs, science, philosophy, biblical criticism, and politics.

Spinoza's l Treatise (1670) is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period. It is presented here in a translation of great clarity and accuracy by Michael Silverthorne and Jonathan Israel, with a substantial historical and philosophical introduction by Jonathan Israel. Jonathan Israel is Professor of Modern European History at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Anyone interested in that history should get this book. 5 people found this helpful.

Spinoza wrote his l Treatise after his Ethics as a kind of explanation, as a defense against attacks against him of heresy .

Spinoza wrote his l Treatise after his Ethics as a kind of explanation, as a defense against attacks against him of heresy, as a demonstration of the philosophical principles in action which he had previously laid out in the highly theoretical Ethics, and - so it has been many times claimed - as to make his views readable to a much wider audience. It is presented here in a new translation of great clarity and accuracy by Michael Silverthorne and Jonathan Israel, with a substantial historical and philosophical introduction by Jonathan Israel. He is author of Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity 1650-1750 (2001).

Series: Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy. His Treatise has profoundly influenced the subsequent history of political thought, Enlightenment 'clandestine' or radical philosophy, Bible hermeneutics, and textual criticism more generally.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press.

Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy. Spinoza's l Treatise (1670) is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period

Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy. Spinoza's l Treatise (1670) is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period.

Written by the Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, the Tractatus (TTP) or Treatise was one of the most controversial texts of the early modern period

Written by the Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, the Tractatus (TTP) or Treatise was one of the most controversial texts of the early modern period. It was a preemptive defense of Spinoza's later work, Ethics, published posthumously in 1677, for which he anticipated harsh criticism. The treatise was published anonymously in 1670 by Jan Rieuwertsz in Amsterdam.

This page intentionally left blank SPINOZA’S L .

This page intentionally left blank SPINOZA’S L TREATISE Spinoza’s l Treatise was published anonymously in  and immediately provoked huge debate. He is currently working on a book on the l Treatise. donald rutherford is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, San Diego. His writings have appeared in the Journal of the History of Philosophy, History of European Ideas, and the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Acknowledgments We wish to thank Hilary Gaskin and Joanna Garbutt from Cambridge University Press for their encouragement and help.

Spinoza's l Treatise (1670) is one of. . Spinoza eventually settled in The Hague, where he lived quietly, studying philosophy, science, and theology, discussing his ideas with a small circle of independent thinkers, and earning his living as a lens grinder. He corresponded with some of the leading philosophers and scientists of his time and was visited by Leibniz and many others.

Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise (1670) is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period. In it Spinoza discusses at length the historical circumstances of the composition and transmission of the Bible, demonstrating the fallibility of both its authors and its interpreters. He argues that free enquiry is not only consistent with the security and prosperity of a state but actually essential to them, and that such freedom flourishes best in a democratic and republican state in which individuals are left free while religious organizations are subordinated to the secular power. His Treatise has profoundly influenced the subsequent history of political thought, Enlightenment 'clandestine' or radical philosophy, Bible hermeneutics, and textual criticism more generally. It is presented here in a translation of great clarity and accuracy by Michael Silverthorne and Jonathan Israel, with a substantial historical and philosophical introduction by Jonathan Israel.
Reviews about Spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy) (7):
Modimeena
Published in 2007, this is the most recent translation of the Theological-Political Treatise by Spinoza. This is not considered his "major" work (Ethics is), but is still an enormous accomplishment for someone writing in the 17th century.

In this volume, Spinoza outlines many things regarding religion and politics, an unusual amalgam, but understandable with regard to his intent. His real intent in this work is to present reasoning for why people should have the freedom to think for themselves and not be persecuted for what they think. He argues that it is in the government's best interest to allow freedom of thought...freedom of religion. Seems like he may have had an influence on the values of the U.S. founders.

This treatise is also seen as one of the earliest cogent attempts at biblical criticism; he shows by some of the same methods used today by many biblical experts and theologians that the biblical documents have errors, contradictions, absurdities, and disputable authorship. He argues against the believability of miracles, and shows that anything called a miracle would have to be something that occurs within the natural scheme of things...not supernatural events.

Einstein said he believed in Spinoza's god. If one is not already familiar with what that is, it becomes clear after reading this volume carefully. He was a pantheist, which essentially means he just thought of nature and natural laws as god, so did not believe in a personal god. So, when he refers to god, he is not referring to the god his readers may think of, which is confusing, but understandable considering the stigma and persecution attached to such thinkers of his day.

While he talks seemingly respectfully in regard to the beliefs of the day, a careful reading will pick up on the biting sarcasm directed to the ignorant commoners and elite...with all due respect, of course. In his introduction, he makes it clear he does not intend the treatise for the eyes of the common people, but only for the educated elite, which is why he wrote it in Latin. He knew the prejudice of common beliefs, but the elite had much the same prejudices. He had to publish it anonymously as well.

This is a very important work in the history of enlightened beliefs, science, philosophy, biblical criticism, and politics. Anyone interested in that history should get this book.
Deorro
Spinoza's "Theological-Political Treatise" originally in Latin was edited by Jonathan Isreal,Enlightenment authority, and translated into English by Israel and Michael Silverthorne.Benedictus' treatise opened the Enlightenment era and is very important philosophy for the modern era. It has been about two years sibce I labored over the words, but I believe Spinoza broke the barriers of church/state orthodoxy and caused free thinking to blossom 1670-1800.The universe was mechanistic and followed natural laws, there were natural laws, but no supernatural laws...Science, separation of church/state, the demise of Divine Right,natural rights of man etc all follow his lightening strike! I often refer to his Moses/Ten Commandment analysis when confronting Tea Party nihilists and government haters with Spinoza's belief that when the hunter/gatherer Hebrews accepted the limitaions of the Ten Commandments from Moses, the Hebrews became more secure and more free because they had Jaweh's protection and the services of the Jewish State to give them security and happiness thus actually more freedom.Spinoza attacked Bible literalism( Fundamentalism) and wrote "how pernicious for both religion and state to allow ministers of things sacred to acquire the right to make decrees or handle the business of government." And for all the Occupy Movement Spinoza wrote "for everyone is guided ny their own pleasure, and the mind is often preoccupied with greed,glory,jealousy,anger etc, that there is no room for reason." Take heed GOP!Needless Spinoza was "verboten" by Orthodoxy...and expelled from his synangogue. Oh, the travails of free thinking and rational discernment!
JUST DO IT
Dr Yalom has a very pleasant way of feeding a lot of knowledge into this interesting story about Spinoza. I was inspired by this book to read a bit more of Spinoza's philosophy as well as venturing further into some instructive material about the same. A good tale of intrigue and humanity and an easy introduction into the thinking of a great philosopher.
Garr
Spinoza wrote his Theological-Political Treatise after his Ethics as a kind of explanation, as a defense against attacks against him of heresy, as a demonstration of the philosophical principles in action which he had previously laid out in the highly theoretical Ethics, and - so it has been many times claimed - as to make his views readable to a much wider audience. The result is a highly readable, extended meditation on the history of biblical interpretation. He makes a persuasive case for the total lack of consistency among religious authorities who have laid down the law before, raising questions about their claims to having access to a true or pure understanding. In fact, his expose impresses upon the reader that every attempt at interpretation of the bible will inevitably be political. That is, no matter how well intentioned and how well informed, all attempts at interpreting the bible cannot help but be shaped by the cultural, historical, and political context of the interpretor. Of course, from the very outset of this work, Spinoza makes a concerted effort to show that all claims of prophetic authority are unfounded.

I found it particularly engaging and interesting to watch Spinoza make these incredible daring (for the time) arguments while at the same time always being careful to insist that he is a deeply religious person and that this work is -- and all his works are -- neither scandalous nor subversive. There are times when it seems like he is engaged in defensive maneuvers to save his life, and other times when his equivocal positioning seems a virtuoso act of rhetorical fencing.

This particular edition comes with Cambridge's usual high quality scholarly reference material throughout.

Related to Spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy) fb2 books: