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by Diana B. Turk

  • ISBN: 0814782752
  • Category: Other
  • Author: Diana B. Turk
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Other formats: rtf lit txt lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: NYU Press (June 21, 2004)
  • Pages: 251 pages
  • FB2 size: 1515 kb
  • EPUB size: 1817 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 488
Download Bound By a Mighty Vow: Sisterhood and Women's Fraternities, 1870-1920 fb2

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Turk presents a mostly balanced treatment of women's fraternities. She fills in gaps left behind by previous scholars. Diana B. Turk is an assistant professor at the Steinhardt School of Education at New York University. Paperback: 251 pages. Publisher: NYU Press (June 21, 2004).

Diana Turk explores the founding and development of the earliest sororities (then called women's fraternities) and .

Diana Turk explores the founding and development of the earliest sororities (then called women's fraternities) and explains how these groups served as support networks to help the first female collegians succeed in the hostile world of nineteenth century higher education. Turk goes on to look at how and in what ways sororities changed over time. Sororities are often thought of as exclusive clubs for socially inclined college students, but Bound by a Mighty Vow, a history of the women's Greek system, demonstrates that these organizations have always served more serious purposes.

The North American fraternity and sorority system began with students who wanted to meet secretly, usually for . a b c d Turk, Diana B. (2004), Bound by a Mighty Vow: Sisterhood and Women's Fraternities, 1870–1920, New York: The NYU Press, p. 260, ISBN 0-8147-8282-5.

The North American fraternity and sorority system began with students who wanted to meet secretly, usually for discussions and debates not thought appropriate by the faculty of their schools. Today they are used as social, professional, and honorary groups that promote varied combinations of community service, leadership, and academic achievement.

Sisterhood, as Diana Turk's history of women's Greek-letter fraternities demonstrates, can be as deeply conservative as it. .

In the case of women's college sororities, founded during the 1870s, sisterhood created a "mighty vow," but it also drew some hard and fast social distinctions that were anything but democratic. Turk has tackled a subject that is nothing if not controversial. As she observes in her preface, "people are rarely neutral on the subject of Greek-letter fraternities" (p. vii).

History of women's soroties - originally called fraternities - and how that shapes women's experiences in college. Sororities are often thought of as exclusive clubs for socially inclined college students, but Bound by a Mighty Vow, a history of the women's Greek system, demonstrates that these organizations have always served more serious purposes

Diana Turk explores the founding and development of the earliest sororities (then called women's . Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. lt;br, Turk goes on to look at how and in what ways sororities changed over time. Published by NYU Press.

Diana B. Turk is the Director of Teacher Education in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human . Turk is the Director of Teacher Education in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is a co-author of the forthcoming Learning Through Doing: Project-Based Learning in US History Classrooms (Pearson), as well as co-author of Teaching Recent Global History (Routledge, 2014) and Teaching US History: Dialogues Between Teachers and Historians (Routledge, 2010), and author of Bound by a Mighty Vow: Sisterhood and Women's Fraternities, 1870-1920 (New York. University Press, 2004).

Sororities are often thought of as exclusive clubs for socially inclined college students, but Bound by a Mighty Vow, a history of the women's Greek system, demonstrates that these organizations have always served more serious purposes. Diana Turk explores the founding and development of the earliest sororities (then called women's fraternities) and explains how these groups served as support networks to help the first female collegians succeed in the hostile world of nineteenth century higher education.

Turk goes on to look at how and in what ways sororities changed over time. While the first generation focused primarily on schoolwork, later Greek sisters used their fraternity connections to ensure social status, gain access to jobs and job training, and secure financial and emotional support as they negotiated life in turn-of-the-century America. The costs they paid were conformity to certain tightly prescribed beliefs of how "ideal" fraternity women should act and what "ideal" fraternity women should do.

Drawing on primary source documents written and preserved by the fraternity women themselves, as well as on oral history interviews conducted with fraternity officers and alumnae members, Bound by a Mighty Vow uncovers the intricate history of these early women's networks and makes a bold statement about the ties that have bound millions of American women to one another in the name of sisterhood.


Reviews about Bound By a Mighty Vow: Sisterhood and Women's Fraternities, 1870-1920 (4):
Fecage
I almost wish this had been required reading when I was a pledge. It provides a really unique look at the early purposes of women's fraternities and sororities, and emphasizes what makes us similar rather than what makes us different. No sugar-coating -- details sororities keeping out "undesirables" of one form or another and the social leg-up membership provided in a day when that was even more important than today.

I'd love to see a 1920-2000 version, too. I understand why this history only covers the period through the early 1900s; a further history would be significantly more voluminous to cover all the challenges these groups have faced.
Ral
I am a sorority alumna and adviser. The best thing I got out of this book was an understanding of the true purpose of most sororities when they started and how they struggled to balance the needs of their collegiate and alumnae members as the organizations aged. So many people now think of sororities as simply social organizations that I think it would be amazing if they understood that these groups were created to encourage female students who were outnumbered and looked down upon as they integrated colleges and universities. As sororities aged their alumnae members faced many of the concerns and negative stereotypes that we are facing again and I hope we can learn something from the way they handled these problems a century ago.
Vaua
I bought this book because our sorority alumnae chapter chose it as a book club selection. Not one of the ladies was able to get through the book. The book should not list an author, instead list the person who compiled a bunch of other peoples ideas together. Most pages had more in the footnotes section than on the page. It was accurate - from what I read, but extremely dry and devoid of any life. What could have been a historically accurate depiction of the struggles that women went through to start their own collegiate social clubs, was instead a pieced together collection of excerpts from other books.
Fani
I am currently a doctoral candidate in the field of education and picked up this book more out of curiosity than anything else. I was really gripped from the beginning and what was originally going to be a hasty perusal became a deep and rich resource. Turk pushes preconceptions and notions of sororities by uncovering layers of meaning that these early fraternities had for the women involved in them. She is able to convey through a wide use of fascinating primary documents the ways these groups supported and encouraged women in early co-educational colleges. She also is able to create a convincing narrative of how they evolved from their original goals and purposes in response to changing situations for women and the historical context they reflect.

Overall I found this personally fascinating and professionally enlightening. It did much to alter my understanding of sororities and early college experiences for women in this country.

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