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by Charles S. Maier

  • ISBN: 0674025563
  • Category: Other
  • Author: Charles S. Maier
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Other formats: docx mbr mobi azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (October 30, 2007)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • FB2 size: 1170 kb
  • EPUB size: 1189 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 187
Download Among Empires: American Ascendancy and Its Predecessors fb2

In its multi-faceted erudition and its scrupulous ambivalence, Among Empires is in a league of its ow.

In its multi-faceted erudition and its scrupulous ambivalence, Among Empires is in a league of its own. I cannot praise it too highly. I envy its author's scholarship and the wonderful subtlety of his analysis. Professor Maier's "Among Empires" may be the most careful and balanced look yet at the similarities between late 20th and early 21st century America and the heights of both the Roman and British empires.

A preeminent American historian addresses these issues in light of the history of empires since antiquity. Eschewing the standard focus on current . foreign policy and the recent spate of pro- and anti-empire polemics, Charles S. Maier uses comparative history to test the relevance of a concept often invoked but not always understood. It confirms that the issue of empire must be a concern of every citizen.

Download books for free. Among Empires: American Ascendancy and Its Predecessors.

Though I thought his argument was very convincin In Among Empires: American Ascendancy and It’s Predecessors, Charles S. Maier develops a thought provoking thesis about America’s rise to empire.

Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History. Center for European Studies Room 121 27 Kirkland Street Cambridge, MA 02138 [email protected] Book Chapter (6). Journal Article (1). Publications By Year.

The latest book by Charles S. Maier is an interesting overview on the life of empire. However, after the theoretical part one cannot escape the impression that the books turns too detailed. It is doubtful whether the long discussions about the US foreign policy during the Cold War could help to understand the essence of empire

Others angrily reject the designation. What stakes would being an empire have for our identity at home and our role abroad? A pre-eminent American historian addresses these issues in light of the history of empires since antiquity devamı.

Book note for Charles S. Maier, Among Empires: American Ascendancy and its Predecessors. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006. cgi?article 3265&context jssw. The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, 2018

Among Empires: American Ascendancy and its Predecessors (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006). Maier, Charles S. (2015). History lived and history written : Germany and the United States, 1945/55-2015" (PDF). Bulletin of the German Historical Institute (Washington DC).

Among Empires: American Ascendancy and its Predecessors (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006). Leviathan . : Inventing Modern Statehood (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press,2014; also in Worlds Connected, Emily Rosenberg, ed. Harvard University Pres, 2012).

Contemporary America, with its unparalleled armaments and ambition, seems to many commentators a new empire. Others angrily reject the designation. What stakes would being an empire have for our identity at home and our role abroad?

A preeminent American historian addresses these issues in light of the history of empires since antiquity. This elegantly written book examines the structure and impact of these mega-states and asks whether the United States shares their traits and behavior. Eschewing the standard focus on current U.S. foreign policy and the recent spate of pro- and anti-empire polemics, Charles S. Maier uses comparative history to test the relevance of a concept often invoked but not always understood. Marshaling a remarkable array of evidence--from Roman, Ottoman, Moghul, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, and British experience--Maier outlines the essentials of empire throughout history. He then explores the exercise of U.S. power in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, carefully analyzing its economic and strategic sources and the nation's relationship to predecessors and rivals.

To inquire about empire is to ask what the United States has become as a result of its wealth, inventiveness, and ambitions. It is to confront lofty national aspirations with the realities of the violence that often attends imperial politics and thus to question both the costs and the opportunities of the current U.S. global ascendancy. With learning, dispassion, and clarity, Among Empires offers bold comparisons and an original account of American power. It confirms that the issue of empire must be a concern of every citizen.


Reviews about Among Empires: American Ascendancy and Its Predecessors (7):
Vaua
The latest book by Charles S. Maier is an interesting overview on the life of empire. The best part of it can be connected with the theoretical evaluation of the empire, especially regarding how the empire treats its borders.

However, after the theoretical part one cannot escape the impression that the books turns too detailed. It is doubtful whether the long discussions about the US foreign policy during the Cold War could help to understand the essence of empire. And Maier delicately avoids answering to the question whether US is empire or not. And sometimes the text may be difficult for non-American (I'm Estonian).

Still, the book can be recommended to the readers who are familiar with issues of the international relations and contemporary history. For the beginners the book may be too difficult.
Very Old Chap
Professor Maier's "Among Empires" may be the most careful and balanced look yet at the similarities between late 20th and early 21st century America and the heights of both the Roman and British empires. Unlike his fellow Harvard colleague Niall Ferguson's "The Roman Predicament" (which I also favorably reviewed), Maier does not assume American imperialism, but rather "compares some of the recurring elements of empires and asks to what extent the United States shares these attributes and what are some of the possible consequences for our current political choices."

Maier looks at these possible consequences and political choices both abroad and at home, arguing that the transnational structure of empire both depends on and consolidates "social cleavages throughout its domain," which seems to define the operative political mode in the U.S.

Whether or not the growing American hegemony benefits more than simply the powerful and well-connected, or even the citizens at home, Maier adduces many economic criteria, but the damage to cultures, ethnic identities, and values other than consumerism must be balanced against the potential for greater, though not always equitable, economic prosperity. If we are to continue the spread of American dominance, then discussions like these must be part of the public dialogue, because individual citizens can no longer simply ignore the rest of the world when making political choices. We have already seen the consequences of such complacency.
Arabella V.
With the demise of the former Soviet Union in 1991-92 and the attacks on Afghanistan and Iraq in the post- 9/11 period there has been an inordinate among of ink spilled in academic circles over the question of whether the United States has become the latest empire. In fact, this question has created something of a cottage industry. Professor Maier's book is a contribution, and not the worst, to this controversy. Militants of this generation who understand what is wrong with the drift of American society must confront the question of the imperialistic nature of the United States head-on. For my generation, the generation of 68, the imperialistic nature of the United States was a given. The question then really centered on what to do about it. For a variety of reasons we were not successful in taming the monster. Each generation must come to an understanding of the nature of imperialist society in its own way. And fight it. Thus, this book is a good place to start to understand that question.

A lot of the current controversy in academic circles (government and military circles have no such difficulties) about whether there is an American Empire gets tangled up in comparisons with past empires. True, the American Empire does not look like previous empires. The real problem is trying to pigeonhole the contours of empire based on past experiences. As if the builders of each empire doe not learn something from the mistakes of previous empires. Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin long ago analyzed the basis contours of modern imperialism in his seminal work Imperialism- The Highest Stage of Capitalism. That outline, although in need of updating to reflect various, mainly technological, in the global capitalist structure remains an important document for militants today. By his or virtually any other definition the United States gets the nod.

But let's get down to brass tasks. Hell, the American Empire, is the mightiest military machine the world has ever known defending a nationally-based global economic infrastructure. Previous empires, like the Roman and British, are punk bush league operations in comparison. Academics can afford to have an agnostic view about whether an empire exists or the effects of imperial power. However, when one's door is kicked in by a foreign, heavily armed soldier in some god forsaken village in Iraq or Vietnam, or your city is flattened in order to `save' it a ready definition of imperialism comes to mind. And a good one.

One of the issues that cloud the question of the American Empire is that there is no readily apparent imperialist ideology. In fact, it is argued, for historical reasons, that there is some kind of popular anti-imperialist ideology in America that has always countered the trend toward empire. I take exception to that notion. While there has always been a section of the chattering classes that has held this position it has never really taken popular root. What is really the dominating popular theme is more like-don't tread on me. That is a very different proposition. And it can be seen most unequivocally when a war, any war, comes along and virtually everyone- from the groves of academia to the local barroom- gets on board. Then the imperialist fist is bared for all to see.

With that caveat, this writer recommends this book. Agnostism on the question of empire in acceptable in the academy. It is the nature of such an institution-unless that heavily-armed soldier mentioned about comes kicking down those doors.
Ddilonyne
Charles Maier manages to create a book that pushes the reader to think in ways might not have before. His writing style is both engaging and brilliant. No other book I've read on the subject matches up. A must read for anyone interested in History.

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