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by Andrew Demshuk

  • ISBN: 1107020735
  • Category: Other
  • Author: Andrew Demshuk
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Other formats: mbr mobi azw lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (April 30, 2012)
  • Pages: 326 pages
  • FB2 size: 1360 kb
  • EPUB size: 1841 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 379
Download The Lost German East: Forced Migration and the Politics of Memory, 1945-1970 fb2

Demshuk's book brings together a new reading of expellee history in the early years of the Federal Republic. It also makes an important contribution to the wider fields of memory and migration studies.

Demshuk's book brings together a new reading of expellee history in the early years of the Federal Republic.

Andrew Demshuk's book is among the first scholarly works to move beyond the . After 1945, Germany was inundated with German refugees ethnically cleansed from territories ceded to East European states.

Andrew Demshuk's book is among the first scholarly works to move beyond the statements of official expellee spokesmen and to explore, sympathetically but critically, the complicated processes through which flesh-and-blood individuals gradually came to terms with the loss of the former homeland. Persuasively argued and elegantly written, The Lost German East does more than force us to rethink the Silesian German experience; it offers a template for understanding how refugees throughout the world have and can come to terms with their losses.

The Lost German East book. The Lost German East: Forced Migration and the Politics of Memory,. A fifth of West Germany's post-1945 population consisted of ethnic German refugees expelled from Eastern Europe, a quarter of whom came from Silesia.

Mobile version (beta). The Lost German East: Forced Migration and the Politics of Memory, 1945-1970. Download (pdf, . 2 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Enthusiasm of historians and sociologists to legitimize memory in Kaliningrad is met with political resistance.

Forced Migration and the Politics of Memory, 1945–1970. Enthusiasm of historians and sociologists to legitimize memory in Kaliningrad is met with political resistance. This work examines conditions and reasons for which certain forms of memory are celebrated and others yield for authentication in contemporary Kaliningrad.

At the close of the Second World War, the Allies expelled several million Germans from the eastern portion of the former Reich. More from New Books in Foreign Policy. Jan Kiely and J. Brooks Jessup, ed. Recovering Buddhism in Modern China (Columbia UP, 2016)added 2 years ago.

He shows that though most of the expellees made good in West Germany, they still thought often about the lost East.

In The Lost German East: Forced Migration and the Politics of Memory, 1945-1970 (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Andrew Demshuk answers many of these questions and thereby sheds considerable light on post-war German history. He shows that though most of the expellees made good in West Germany, they still thought often about the lost East. Not surprisingly given the twists and turns of nostalgia, they created an idealized image of these territories, one without Nazis

Andrew Demshuk (2012). The Lost German East.

Andrew Demshuk (2012). Forced migration and the politics of memory (1945 - 1970). Recommended by Jonas Grygier. Cambridge University Press. The Lost German East examines how and why millions of Silesian expellees came to terms with the loss of their homeland.

After 1945, Germany was inundated with ethnic German refugees expelled from Eastern Europe. Andrew Demshuk explores why they integrated into West German society. ENG. Number of Pages. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything.

The Lost German East examines how and why millions of Silesian expellees came to terms with the loss of their homeland. Applying theories of memory and stalgia, as well as recent studies on ethnic cleansing, Andrew Demshuk shows how, over time, most expellees came to recognize that the idealized world they mourned longer existed.

A fifth of West Germany's post-1945 population consisted of ethnic German refugees expelled from Eastern Europe, a quarter of whom came from Silesia. As the richest territory lost inside Germany's interwar borders, Silesia was a leading objective for territorial revisionists, many of whom were themselves expellees. The Lost German East examines how and why millions of Silesian expellees came to terms with the loss of their homeland. Applying theories of memory and nostalgia, as well as recent studies on ethnic cleansing, Andrew Demshuk shows how, over time, most expellees came to recognize that the idealized world they mourned no longer existed. Revising the traditional view that most of those expelled sought a restoration of prewar borders so they could return to the east, Demshuk offers a new answer to the question of why, after decades of violent upheaval, peace and stability took root in West Germany during the tense early years of the Cold War.
Reviews about The Lost German East: Forced Migration and the Politics of Memory, 1945-1970 (2):
Dynen
Imagine if you will Michigan State University having beaten University of Michigan in every catagory including football for 4 years in a row. Then the Governors of MI , OH, and IN decide that with this resounding defeat all of U of M and surrounding Ann Arbor will be given over to Michigan State to do as they please. And they do - they change names streets, titles and evacuate everyone residing in this area to live south of the boarder in Ohio. After many years and petitions having fallen on deaf ears the memories of what was U of M and Ann Arbor are left with a few. And these stories of what was would never be heard of again unless... what was swept undr the historical carpet of the new victors long ago is brought to light. (In Dr. Andrew Demshuk's book of the lost German East...has put into historical perspective the What if... I have tried to imagine if it were to happen on more personal perspective) So enjoy the book I did.
Leyl
Even though I am not a fan of history, I have to say that my brother did an excellent job on this book.

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