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by Margaret Sayers Peden,Susan Sontag,Juan Rulfo

  • ISBN: 0802133908
  • Category: Other
  • Author: Margaret Sayers Peden,Susan Sontag,Juan Rulfo
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Other formats: mobi azw docx mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Grove Press; Reprint edition (March 10, 1994)
  • Pages: 124 pages
  • FB2 size: 1889 kb
  • EPUB size: 1590 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 823
Download Pedro Paramo fb2

PEDRO PARAMO By Juan Rulfo. Translated by Margaret Sayers Peden. Foreword by Susan Sontag.

PEDRO PARAMO By Juan Rulfo. 124 pp. New York: Grove Press.

Juan Rulfo, Margaret Sayers Peden (Translator)

Juan Rulfo, Margaret Sayers Peden (Translator). Susan Sontag (Foreword). A classic of Mexican modern literature about a haunted village. As one enters Juan Rulfo's legendary novel, one follows a dusty road to a town of death. Pedro Páramo Pedro Paramo (1955), Juan Rulfo Pedro Paramo is a novel written by Juan Rulfo about a man named Juan Preciado who travels to his recently deceased mother's hometown, Comala, to find his father, only to come across a literal ghost townpopulated, that is, by spectral figures. Paramo was a key influence on Latin American writers such as Gabriel García Márquez.

Juan Rulfo Susan Sontag was born in New York City on January 16, 1933.

Margaret Sayers Peden received a bachelor's degree in 1948, a master's degree in 1963, and doctorate degree in 1966 from the University of Missouri. She was a professor of Spanish at the University of Missouri until her retirement in 1989. Susan Sontag was born in New York City on January 16, 1933. from the University of Chicago and did graduate work in philosophy, literature and theology at Harvard University and Saint Anne's College, Oxford University.

Pedro Páramo is a novel written by Juan Rulfo about a man named Juan Preciado who travels to his recently deceased mother's hometown, Comala, to find his father, only to come across a literal ghost town─populated, that is, by spectral figures

Pedro Páramo is a novel written by Juan Rulfo about a man named Juan Preciado who travels to his recently deceased mother's hometown, Comala, to find his father, only to come across a literal ghost town─populated, that is, by spectral figures. Initially, the novel was met with cold critical reception and sold only two thousand copies during the first four years; later, however, the book became highly acclaimed. Páramo was a key influence on Latin American writers such as Gabriel García Márquez.

When Susan Sontag, in her foreword to this book, calls Pedro Páramo 'one of the masterpieces of 20th-century world literature,' she is not being hyperbolic.

Juan Rulfo, Margaret Sayers Peden, Susan Sontag. As one enters Juan Rulfo's legendary novel, one follows a dusty road to a town of death

Juan Rulfo, Margaret Sayers Peden, Susan Sontag. Time shifts from one consciousness to another in a hypnotic flow of dreams, desires, and memories, a world of ghosts dominated by the figure of Pedro P?ramo - lover, overlord, murderer. Rulfo?s extraordinary mix of sensory images, violent passions and unfathomable mysteries has been a profound influence on a whole generation of Latin American writers including Carlos Fuentes, Mario Vargas Llosa and Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Rulfo, Juan; Peden, Margaret Sayers. In one such village of the mind, Comala, he set his classic novel Pedro Paramo, a dream-like tale that intertwines a man's quest to find his lost father and reclaim his patrimony with the father's obsessive love for a woman who will not be possessed, Susana San Juan. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Pedro Paramo By : Margaret Sayers Peden Juan Rulfo. New York Herald Tribune" When Susan Sontag, in her foreword to this book, calls Pedro Paramo one of the masterpieces of 20th-century world literature, she is not being hyperbolic. Views: 345. Author: Margaret Sayers Peden Juan Rulfo. Publication Date: 10/03/1994. With its dense interweaving of time, its routine interaction of the living and the dead, its surreal sense of the everyday, and with simultaneousand e of apparently incompatible realities, this brief novel by the Mexican writer Juan Rulfo strides through unexplored territory with a sure and determined step.

Pedro Paramo was originally published in Mexico in 1955, though this is the first translation in England. Susan Sontag provides an eloquent foreword to the novel. She is surely right to assert that: 'Pedro Paramo is a classic in the truest sense

Pedro Paramo was originally published in Mexico in 1955, though this is the first translation in England. Despite the fact that Rulfo wrote only this novel and the short stories of The Burning Plain, he has been universally acknowledged as one of the masters of recent Mexican writing, both because of the sobriety and resonant understatement that he consistently achieves, and because of the way he uses these gifts to capture the emptiness and despair of rural Mexico. She is surely right to assert that: 'Pedro Paramo is a classic in the truest sense. It is a book that seems, in retrospect, as if it had to be written.

Margaret Sayers Peden’s superb translation renders the novel as poetic and mysterious in English as it is in Spanish

Margaret Sayers Peden’s superb translation renders the novel as poetic and mysterious in English as it is in Spanish. Josephine Sacabo’s photographs tell, in her words, "the story of a woman forced to take refuge in madness as a means of protecting her inner world from the ravages of the forces around her: a cruel and tyrannical patriarchy, a church that offers no redemption, the senseless violence of revolution, death itself. Deserted villages of rural Mexico, where images and memories of the past linger like unquiet ghosts, haunted the imaginations of two artists-writer Juan Rulfo and photographer Josephine Sacabo

Dentro de su brevedad, determinada por el rigor y la concentración expresiva, Pedro Páramo sintetiza la mayor parte de los temas que han interesado siempre a los mexicanos, ese misterio nacional que el talento de Juan Rulfo ha sabido condensar por medio de los cotidianos habitantes de Comala, región inscrita ya en la mitología literaria universal.
Reviews about Pedro Paramo (7):
Fomand
My review at the bottom but.....please do not review if.....
- you did not enjoy the book because your Spanish is not that great (why give it a bad review for your lack of language skills?)
- You did not enjoy the book because it was too confusing (it's complex, not confusing, was Shakespeare a bad writer for his complexity?)
- ***If you found it too "depressing" and "dark"*** (Any book who makes you "feel" deep emotions accomplished a rare thing, if you felt depressed, well that's personal, very personal.

This book is taught in many universities and given to people who are just learning Spanish, why??
It must be read by someone who can understand Spanish fluently and more...
I recommend first buying it in English if your Spanish vocabulary is too narrow.

******This is simply a MASTERPIECE, one that doesn't fade in time, history or between cultures,
such a masterpiece that even the grand Gabriel Garcia Marquez from "100 years of solitude" knew the book
by memory (it's a small novel) and said after reading it he had such powerful emotions that he had only encountered very few times in his life.

This novel will make you feel you are hanging through time and space, and gets you inside the minds of the deceased who still mourn their religious sins, imposed by the Catholic church. Yes, it is dark, and can be as some say "depressing"..... but I call it deep and magical, and remember that Mexican people do not view death as other cultures do.

This novel sends you to old Mexico, the torn one, where people are jailed between time and space (how he accomplishes this, amazing!), between religion and freedom, between poverty and wealth.

The time of this novel is set during either the Mexican revolution or "the Cristero War"
What it is clear is that this novel is set during the times in Mexico where "Hacendados" (Landowners) who lived in "Haciendas" controlled entire towns (Very similar to the FEUDAL and SERF times in Europe)

Here Juan Rulfo gets deep into the conscious and the sub-conscious mind of the people from such towns, you get into the minds and hearts of the deceased who still mourn their sins.

It is one of those novels that sticks to you for a long time, often without conclusion, it makes you "feel" but nothing is concrete.
It is powerful, mysterious, humorously dark and very real.

Attached is some the photography by Juan Rulfo, as I feel it depicts his only written novel as well......
Llbery
I bought this book because I am learning Spanish. I also bought the English translation. I saw one review that said that this is written in old Spanish which I think may be true. I am still not 100 percent fluent, but this book seems to be harder to read than more modern material. However I think that this has been helpful by pushing me harder. I do wish that I had bought one of the versions on the Kindle as it is hard to read between two actual books. The story is a great read and although I can easily comprehend the English version I like the Spanish version better, it seems to be somhow more impactful.
Ger
I read this book because I had read in an article that it was one of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's favorites and that he had memorized the whole book!

I was fascinated by the first half of the book and couldn't put it down. Not a word was wasted. The characters and landscape so well described and the magical quality/experiences/scenes so well integrated into the narrative that it was perfectly believable. I would recommend reading it simply for this first part alone.

However, I was less satisfied with the second part. It felt a bit too gloomy, dark, unbelievable to me. The "magic" was less... magical. If it had not been so short, I would likely have not finished it.

That being said, I would read the first part again for its unique rendering of hope and anticipation and magic.
Mildorah
The only book I ever read, that the minute I finished it, I started it over again. Yes, I read it twice in one day. It reminds me of the movie, The Sixth Sense(only spookier the whole way through), in that when you finish it, you can't believe how it comes out, so you have to experience it all over again, to make sure you aren't losing your sense of how reality fits together.
Nikohn
This title was recommended to me by a Spanish speaking friend, so I bought this English version. My gut says there is a lot of loss in translation AND/OR the person who translated it was not a native Spanish speaker. I expected fragmented writing, lack of plot, etc. but there were parts that simply didn't make sense in English at all, and I think those are the areas in which Spanish probably more elegantly illustrates the existentialist tone of the story.
Agarus
Muy buen libro, bastante perturbador pero a la vez inspirante a ser agradecido por las muchas cosas que han cambiado a travez de los años.
Agalen
Deceptively short, opaque, mystical myth of Mexico. Stands shoulder to shoulder with Ulysses, War & Peace, and a hundred other classics; one of the Great Books of the Twentieth Century. I discovered this book by accident when I took a class. We didn't end up covering Pedro Paramo, but I read it on my own time and it impressed me more than Cortazer, Marquez, or Esquivel, who are "not exactly lightweights, Dude". They are all great, but this writer is above and before them.
Clasico de la literatura en espan'ol imperdible para lectores con imaginaci'on relatable la vida de las personas a prrincipios del siglo 19 !!!!esquisito

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