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by malcolm mackay

  • ISBN: 023076620X
  • Category: No category
  • Author: malcolm mackay
  • Other formats: lrf txt rtf docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: MANTLE; 1ST edition (2013)
  • FB2 size: 1923 kb
  • EPUB size: 1434 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 909
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Lewis Winter – Twenty-five years of criminal activity, and still near the bottom. One good deal can change all that. Zara Cope – It’s not the life she’d have chosen, an older man wanting her to settle down.

Lewis Winter – Twenty-five years of criminal activity, and still near the bottom. Nate Colgan – You do what Nate tells you, when he tells you. Even his employers know that.

And Mackay takes the reader by the throat and immerses the hapless plonker who happens to pick up this ambitious trilogy into the . I’m looking forward to the 2nd instalment in the trilogy about Glasgow’s criminal underworld, How A Gunman Says Goodbye

And Mackay takes the reader by the throat and immerses the hapless plonker who happens to pick up this ambitious trilogy into the underworld of organized crime without mercy. It's ieasy to kill a man. It's hard to kill a man well. I’m looking forward to the 2nd instalment in the trilogy about Glasgow’s criminal underworld, How A Gunman Says Goodbye. Incidentally this book won the Deanston Scottish Crime Book of the Year prize.

Everyone is treated as a friend. How much of that warmth is real, only Frank ever knows. He has a policy, though: welcome them in, treat them as friends and listen carefully. He has a policy, though: welcome them in, treat them as friends and listen carefully h, but it has helped keep him at the top of the game all these years. Everyone who knows what Frank does for a living also knows that he’s the best. He isn’t anything any more. That’s what he keeps telling people. Coming back stronger and better than ever before.

Malcolm Mackay's acclaimed debut series, the Glasgow Trilogy, has been nominated for countless international prizes

Malcolm Mackay's acclaimed debut series, the Glasgow Trilogy, has been nominated for countless international prizes. The first of the series, The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter, was shortlisted for the CWA John Creasey New Blood Dagger Award, the Theakson Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Award, and longlisted for the the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger for Best Thriller of the Year Award. Mackay was born in Stornoway on Scotland's Isle of Lewis, where he still lives.

Электронная книга "The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter", Malcolm Mackay. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

One murder gets the police interested, two gets them excited. When Jamieson hires Calum for the Lewis Winter hit, he considers Calum, who paces his jobs carefully, not too hot, not too cold, but just right. A Goldilocks employee. In The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter, freelance hitman Calum MacLean takes a job from crime lord Peter Jamieson to kill a fairly lowlevel drug dealer who is poaching on Jamieson's turf. Calum, who prefers the freedom of freelance work, takes the one-off job with no reservations and applies his usual precautions.

Malcolm Mackay's award-winning The Glasgow Trilogy continues in How A Gunman Says Goodbye and The Sudden Arrival . They call this genre Tartan Noir and absolutely The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter is a first class member of that’ Lee Child. I finished it almost in a sitting.

Malcolm Mackay's award-winning The Glasgow Trilogy continues in How A Gunman Says Goodbye and The Sudden Arrival of Violence. The prose is spare and taut and pulls the reader into the minds of the disparate characters. beautifully and truthfully written with the deceptive simplicity of a fine short story’ Ann Cleeves, creator of VERA. A remarkably original debut. this is a book that it would be hard not to finish in one sitting. a wholly believable and unnerving portrait of organised crime’ Observer.

Malcolm Mackay's remarkably original thriller shines a light on Glasgow's criminal . The hard way has consequences. Even the talented must be wary of that fact.

Malcolm Mackay's remarkably original thriller shines a light on Glasgow's criminal underworld, writes Alison Flood. Malcolm Mackay's The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter – the first in a trilogy – is an intriguingly odd, remarkably original debut. It's the story of a murder, but it stands out in a crowded market by being virtually back to front. There's no quest for an unknown murderer, no race to avert a death – in fact, the detective character isn't even introduced until some way into the novel.

Listen to the first chapter from the audiobook of The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter by Malcolm Mackay, read by Angus King. The second book in the Glasgow Trilogy How A Gunman Says Goodbye will follow soon. com/book/malcolmm. oflewiswinter. An arresting, gripping novel of dark relationships and even darker moralities: introducing a remarkable new voice in crime fiction. A man lives alone in his Glasgow flat. The telephone rings; a casual conversation, but behind this a job offer. The clues are there if you know to look for them. Malcolm Mackay The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter Glasgow crime.

Malcolm Mackay was born and grew up in Stornoway where he still lives. The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter, his much lauded debut was the first in the Glasgow Trilogy, set in the city's underworld. It won the Crime Thriller Book Club Best Read and was shortlisted for the CWA John Creasey New Blood Dagger Award for Best Crime Debut of the Year and the Scottish First Book of the Year Award. How A Gunman Says Goodbye, the second book in the series, won the Deanston Scottish Crime Book of the Year Award. The Sudden Arrival of Violence is the final book in the trilogy.


Reviews about The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter (The Glasgow Trilogy) (7):
Frei
The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter. How a Gunman Says Goodbye. 2013. The Sudden Arrival of Violence. 2014.

These are MacKay’s first published novels and all three appeared within the space of a year. Given how assured the writing and plotting is in all three of them, that blows the mind. The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter was shortlisted for the CWA John Creasey New Blood Dagger Award for best crime debut of the year and the Scottish First Book of the Year Award. How a Gunman Says Goodbye won the Deanston Scottish Crime Book of the Year Award.

They form a true trilogy, with a story line that stretches across all three but each book has a story strong enough and compelling enough that the reader can read any of the three novels alone and not suffer. Reading all three in sequence, though, completes the story of how crime goes on in Glasgow, and what goes on in the heads of the hard guys and cops who oppose each other on that embattled turf. On balance, it’s more about hard guys than it is about coppers though and what MacKay has to say about them is fascinating. Once you start one of these books, it’s awfully hard to put it down.

At the heart of the narrative is the story of two hit men, one (Frank) who is growing old, the other (Callum) who is younger but seasoned also. Frank’s gone in for a hip operation. Callum’s called upon to replace him. Frank’s comfortable working within an organization. Callum’s not. Neither of them really has friends. Callum is Frank’s protégé and his candidate to replace him whenever he can’t continue at his job, but when the possibility arrives that it might actually happen, Frank isn’t happy at all. No one (with one exception) is truly friends with anyone else in this bleak crime noir series, which owes a debt to old masters Hammett and Chandler. MacKay writes –no! he thinks—more like Hammett than like Chandler. Like the master, he has the lingo and mindset of the tough guys and the cops down cold, and he captures the corroding cynicism that infuses all of Hammett’s writing as well.

The series starts with a contract on a minor drug dealer who’s made the mistake of encroaching on mid-level crime boss Peter Jamieson’s drug empire. Jamieson and his cold-blooded second-in-command John Young manipulate players with brutal disregard for anyone’s comfort but their own. The series ends with two deaths, a money man’s and a grass’s, but the event spirals into increasing levels of insecurity, paranoia and ultimately violence.

It’s told by a third person narrator but the perspective shifts from player to player, even within the chapters. Short choppy sentences dominate: you follow not only their actions but, step by step, how they reason through to them.

There’s no question. The Glasgow Trilogy (the publisher’s name for these three books) is the real thing and MacKay is a talent to watch. He is apparently already working on a fourth book, but with different characters.
Hawk Flying
I've read the entire trilogy, tried to enjoy the ride, kinda did, but feel compelled to review the collection because of my frustration with opportunities missed or lost. Many other readers have summarized the plot and main character so I won't be redudant. I suppose I'm a minority amongst most of the reviewers, but I did have a few problems. Among them:

The series might as well have taken place in Glasgow, Jamaica, or Glasgow, Delaware. Yes, those places really exist and yes, I'm being hyperbolic, but my point is Mackay appears to have made a choice not to organically use Glasgow, Scotland, as a setting. (Think Marlowe's L.A. or Warshawski's Chicago, for example.) I never got the feeling that the city and its culture informed the characters and enriched their stories. I'm not talking about name checking streets and restaurants but the 'Glasgow' inhabited by these characters is a blank slate and thus made the books a poorer reading experience.

Mackay's occasional habit of addressing the reader as 'you' was annoying. He would write that a character is reading a book then add, 'if you must know what...' and then tell the reader the book title. This kind of thing happened too often for me. I'm reading fiction and really don't wish to be patronized or have the fourth wall broken. Either describe what the character is reading - which can go a long way to informing who the character is w/o doing endless backstory or do endless backstory and make it interesting. Same goes for names, as in, 'if you care, her name is...' etc. Well, if Mackay is making a point that a character is reading a book or has a name, just say what it is and don't be so cute about it. Was annoying and unnecessary.

Character POV: I'm not a huge believer in The Inviolate Rules Of Writing, but the constant 'head hopping' in the middle of scenes between different characters thoughts was jarring - and unnecessary. It felt lazy. Doing it a couple of times for effect might be cool, but just shifting points of view without any seeming motivation other than to more easily move along the exposition had the effect of taking me out of the story.

Last, and this may be semantics, but to me the use of the word 'trilogy' means a financial rip-off. You're really buying one book for the price of three because the first two don't really 'end'. They're not really stand-alones. If the reader is invested in what ultimately happens to Callum, you need to buy all three as neither the first two books have a strong ending. They just ask you to continue the journey. (One might argue that the second book does have a proper ending; I'm not going to spoil the plot by spelling it out -- it's in the title.)

I wish this review wasn't so negative because Mackay can write - when he tries, and when he uses all the tools in the toolbox. Hopefully, the next ones improve.
adventure time
Lee Child recommended this author. OK, I thought. The first few chapters didn't read well; I didn't like the unusual writing style. But as I got into the rhythm of the story it hooked me. I'm glad I stuck with the book long enough to appreciate it!
INvait
Without realizing it was part of a trilogy by Malcolm Mackay, I first read the second book in this series ("How a Gunman Says Goodbye"). I loved "Gunman" and so quickly went to this book, the first in the series. "The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter" is not quite as perfectly plotted, structured and written as “Gunman” but I am not going to quibble because it still stands tall above most others in the "crime / thriller" genre in all those respects. It is impressive how Mackay tightly plotted and interwove the two novels and I expect that will continue through the third in the series, The number of characters who move through the stories is large but manageable and most come off a fully-formed rather than as stereotyped cut-outs.
Moronydit
Economically told yet complex, taut crime story. This is the start of a trilogy, and I hadnt read or heard of Malcolm Mackay, but I raced through the three books. His style including lots of interior monologue for explication, is crystal clear, dry and sometimes funny, but after a while felt claustraphobic, even though the plot had expanded. The characters are all bad guys but human. the setting is Edinburgh, but there's no local color - it could be any town big enough to have rival mobsters. The author has a fine feel for how hitmen, gang bosses, lowlifes, women who get involved, and corrupt as well as honest cops function. Fast reading, always good in down'n'dirty noirs.

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