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by Vicki; Howard Kottler Halper

  • ISBN: 0924335254
  • Category: No category
  • Author: Vicki; Howard Kottler Halper
  • Other formats: lrf azw mbr lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tacoma Art Museum; First Edition edition (2004)
  • FB2 size: 1614 kb
  • EPUB size: 1475 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 314
Download Look Alikes: The Decal Plates of Howard Kottler fb2

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Over sixty illustrations of the decal plates show the range of Kottler's imagery and the piquancy of his humour. In the late 1960s influential ceramist Howard Kottler (1930-1989) began to experiment with commercial decals and store-bought plates. Kottler altered the decals, often with political intent, by cutting and combining them, then adhering them to cheap white porcelain plates he purchased in bulk. Kottler's apparent rejection of the hand-made object and embrace of the conceptual over the tactile were unique among the revolutionary ceramists of the 1960s and 1970s.

The plate featured on the cover reflects this Northwest artist's gay theme. A chronology spans early surrealism to Kottler's death in 1989. Also included is text from Kottler's 1969 self-published catalog titled Howard Kottler.

In the late 1960s influential ceramist Howard Kottler (1930-1989) began to experiment with commercial decals and store-bought plates.

Halper, Vicki (2004). Seattle, WA: Tacoma Art Museum.

Originally trained as an optometrist, Kottler graduated from Ohio State University in 1952 with a Bachelor of Arts in Biological Sciences. While working on his undergrad, he took a university ceramics course in 1952 that shifted his focus and returned to Ohio State to study ceramics. Halper, Vicki (2004).

Seattle, WA: Tacoma Art Museum. Howard Kottler's Plates and Politics". Minneapolis, MN: American Craft Council. Retrieved 25 July 2013. Shaykett, Jessica (27 December 2012). a b "Howard Kottler: A Retrospective Look". a b c d Schwartz, Judith S (1995).

Howard Kottler 1930–1989 - Homage to Gertrude (four works). Howard Kottler 1930–1989. Howard Kottler 1930–1989 - Untitled.

Seattle, WA: Tacoma Art Museum, 2004. Howard Kottler: An Irresistibly Irreverent Iconoclast. Ceramics: Art and Perception 22, (1995). Confrontational Ceramics

Seattle, WA: Tacoma Art Museum, 2004. Confrontational Ceramics. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008.

This collection of works from the American Supperware series includes: Drip Dry, Made in the USA, and Exhausted Glory. Howard Kottler (Artist).

In English. Northwest Perspective Series. 76 pp. with 79 ills. (71 color). 26 x 21 cm. LC 2004-107170. Documents an exhibition of some 60 works by American ceramist Kottler (1930-1989) that focused on his playful and often subversive works of the 1960s and 70s in which he manipulated commercial ceramic decals typically used for souvenir china, before applying them to store-bought blank porcelain plates. Kottler's apparent rejection of the hand-made object and embrace of the conceptual over the tactile were unique among the revolutionary ceramists of the 1960s and 1970s. Kottler's messages were often as profoundly anti-establishment as his medium. As a Viet Nam war protester, he cut and rearranged the American flag to create Made in the USA As a gay man, he changed the couple in Grant Wood's American Gothic into identical males and turned seemingly innocuous images into sexual double entendres. He positioned his work squarely within the rich tradition of wit, irony, appropriation, and gender-bending epitomized by modernist Marcel Duchamp. including formal, boxed sets now in museum collections. Over sixty illustrations of the decal plates show the range of Kottler's imagery and the piquancy of his humor. In the late 1960s influential ceramist Howard Kottler (1930-1989) began to experiment with commercial decals and store-bought plates. Kottler altered the decals, often with political intent, by cutting and combining them, then adhering them to cheap white porcelain plates he purchased in bulk.

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