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by Rebecca West,J. Christopher Herold

  • ISBN: 0809436558
  • Category: No category
  • Author: Rebecca West,J. Christopher Herold
  • Other formats: lit azw rtf docx
  • Language: French
  • Publisher: Time-Life Books (1981)
  • Pages: 647 pages
  • FB2 size: 1611 kb
  • EPUB size: 1884 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 807
Download Mistress to an Age: A Life of Madame de Stael (Time Reading Program Special Edition) fb2

Mistress to an Age book. Paperback, special, 614 pages.

Mistress to an Age book. Published January 1st 1958 by Time Life Medical. Mistress to an Age: A Life of Madame de Staël. 0809436558 (ISBN13: 9780809436552). Madame de Stael was courageous and prolific in her contacts with important personages of her age. A prolific letter writer, she also wrote novels and drama. In the 1790s she established a salon at Coppe This is a marvelous introduction to an amazing woman who participated in the beginnings of Romanticism.

The Time Reading Program (TRP) was a book sales club run by. .Time revived the program in the early 1980s, with many of the same titles. Mistress to an Age: A life of Madame de Staël, J. Christopher Herold. Christ Stopped at Eboli, Carlo Levi.

The Time Reading Program (TRP) was a book sales club run by Time–Life, the publisher of Time magazine, from 1962 through 1966. Time was known for its magazines, and nonfiction book series' published under the Time-Life imprint, while the TRP books were reprints of an eclectic set of literature, both classic and contemporary, as well as nonfiction works and topics in history. The Bridge Over the River Kwai, Pierre Boulle and Xan Fielding.

Madame de Stael was an important figure, but not as important as the length of this book merits. Also, his prose is mediocre. Maybe that's asking a lot of an historian who isn't a literary man (like Nicolson), but there are other biographers and historians who write much more readably.

Результаты поиска по книге. Arvin's portrait of Melville snagged a National Book Award (NBA) in 1950 and is still a leading title on the sailor turned. J. Time, Incorporated, 1964.

Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers & Technology Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English . by. Herold, J. Christopher.

Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers & Technology Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Radio Programs. Librivox Free Audiobook. Spirituality & Religion Podcasts.

J. ISBN 10: 080943654X ISBN 13: 9780809436545. Publisher: Time-Life Books, 1981.

Herold was perhaps best known for Mistress to an Age: a Life of Madame de Stael, a Bookof-theMonth Club selection that won the National Book Award for nonfiction in 1958

Herold was perhaps best known for Mistress to an Age: a Life of Madame de Stael, a Bookof-theMonth Club selection that won the National Book Award for nonfiction in 1958. The author was a slim man of medium height who wrote in longhand and liked to work against a deadline. He was born in Czechoslovakia of Austrian parents. Mr. Herold's grandfather was the late pianist Artur Schnabel. In 1939, after the family had moved to Germany, it was he who urged the young Mr. Herold to immigrate to the United States.

GERMAINE DE STAËL: Mistress to an Age. An aristocrat and daughter of great wealth, she assisted at the birth of the French Revolution; her days and nights a turmoil of political and amorous intrigue, she wrote novels at the breakfast table and pamphlets while she changed her clothes. Disciple of constancy and the grand passion, she carried on ardent, profound love affairs with four brilliant, demanding men at the same time-and satisfied and tortured them all. Genius, great heart, great lover, any man who knew Germaine was hers forever. Lc Classification Number.

Christopher Herold vigorously tells the story of the fierce Madame de Stael, revealing her courageous opposition to Napoleon, her whirlwind affairs with the great intellectuals of her day, and her idealistic rebellion against all that was cynical, tyrannical, and passionless. Germaine de Stael's father was Jacques Necker, the finance minister to Louis XVI, and her mother ran an influecntial literary-political. Time was known for its magazines, and nonfiction book series' published under the Time-Life imprint, while the TRP books were reprints of an eclectic set of literature, both. Anne Louise Germaine de Staël-Holstein, commonly known as Madame de Staël, was a French woman of letters and historian of Genevan origin whose lifetime overlapped with the events of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era.

New paperback.
Reviews about Mistress to an Age: A Life of Madame de Stael (Time Reading Program Special Edition) (7):
Doomblade
This biography won the National Book Award, but I don't think it rises to even that level.

Madame de Stael was an important figure, but not as important as the length of this book merits. Harold Nicolson wrote a much shorter (and much better) biography of Constant, de Stael's sometime lover, and Herold needed an editor to reduce the number of pages.

Also, his prose is mediocre. Maybe that's asking a lot of an historian who isn't a literary man (like Nicolson), but there are other biographers and historians who write much more readably.

The book is invaluable in part, but it's not to be read for leisurely pleasure and information, like Taylor's bio of Beaverbrook or Crankshaw's of Bismarck. Skipping around is recommended.
Ferri - My name
Madame De Stael was a pivotal character and intellect of her times. Even though hysterical and definitely unreasonable in her personal dealings she was a major player in the downfall of Napoleon and had political impact on the notion of what a liberal human government should look like in the following decades. She would fit in today beautifully. Would have loved to attend one of her parties .
Mavegelv
I've always loved reading about European history, and several times over the years I've read about the famous salon of Madame de Stael. However, none of the books ever said anything except that it was a meeting place for the great intellects of the time and that Madame de Stael was a brilliant conversationalist. I wanted to know more about this woman, and was very happy to come across this biography by J. Christopher Herold. I just finished the book, and can say without hesitation that it's one of the best biographies I've ever read. It reads like a novel; indeed, Mr. Herold has the insight into character of a great novelist. Additionally, he writes well and is extremely witty. He is not blind to the faults of his subject. Actually, her faults probably outweighed her positive traits. She was remarkably selfish. Her needs were the only thing that mattered. Everyone had to be at her beck and call. She was also extremely manipulative. When one of her numerous lovers would threaten to break off with her she would threaten to kill herself or find some other way to make them so guilty that they would come back. She was fickle. She would write to one man and tell him that her life revolved around his love. Of course, at the same time she might be writing to two or three other men, telling them the same thing! Despite her reputation as a staunch foe of Napoleon, she could sometimes put her self-interest ahead of principle. She was willing to turn her head the other way and stop criticizing Napoleon when she thought that Bonaparte, as a quid pro quo, would be willing to repay some money that the government had owed her father. One of the difficulties in remaining open-minded concerning Madame de Stael's intellectual achievements is that her rather unruly and pathetic personal life tends to color one's judgement. At her home in Switzerland she surrounded herself with various intellectuals who were either past lovers, current lovers, or those hoping to be future lovers. The scenario played out like a Marx Brothers movie, with Madame de Stael as the Margaret Dumont character. Everyone lived in the same house, yet when it came to dealing with feelings rather than with intellectual topics everyone communicated by letter rather than by discussion. Everyone engaged in histrionics- there was much swooning and talk of suicide. One man, August Schlegel, in a letter which is reproduced in the book, promised to be Madame de Stael's willing slave. Some lovers, such as Benjamin Constant, would break free but when summoned by Germaine would crawl back like a whipped dog. The home of Madame de Stael was a bouillabaisse of the debased. One thing that Mr. Herold can never satisfactorily explain is how Germaine was able to exert this gravitational grip on the men in her orbit. Despite having flashing eyes and an ample bosom, she was not attractive. Mr. Herold tells us that she had superhuman energy and was a brilliant conversationalist. Perhaps that is where the problem lies......we can't be present at the conversations, and Madame de Stael lived in the days before radio and newsreels. But, somehow, she attracted the "best and the brightest" of her day, and that was enough to worry Napoleon and cause Germaine's exile from Paris. One amusing thing about Madame de Stael is that she was always tongue tied in Napoleon's presence. Mr. Herold relates a story concerning one time when Germaine was invited to attend a function where Napoleon would be present. She vowed she would be ready for the occasion and prepared answers for every possible question. Unfortunately, on the big night Napoleon took one look at her low-cut dress and merely remarked that is was obvious she must have "fed" her own children when they were babies. Alas, Germaine once again didn't know what to say. She did get her revenge years later when Napoleon's second wife gave birth to a male heir, the King of Rome. When asked to say something "nice", Germaine thought a moment and said, "I hope they find a good wetnurse!" Score one for Madame de Stael....
Ochach
The average reader may not be familiar with the name Germaine Necker de Stael. However, Herold paints a vivid portrait of a woman who dominated thinking and philosophy during a tumultuous time in Europe's history.

He shows us a fearless, intelligent, uncompromising woman who pursued both intellectual fulfillment and passion equally.

Herold not only gives a fair accounting of the events of the time period as background, but does so without allowing them to dominate the story of this amazing woman.
Raniconne
An interesting, factual story about the life of a woman close to those in power during the turbulent time of
the French Revolution. Her father was a one-time minister to royalty, and she moved in similar circles.
Gela
Dull but interesting. Highly recommended for slow readers!
Oghmaghma
The book was in fine condition which means it had probably never even been opened since it was printed in 1957. It is a thick book (paperback). The minute I opened it the cover flew off. That was okay with me as it made it easier to turn the pages. After about 150 pages of the book, I found it a bore so that said 'enough already!' and I am now off to another book.
For $35.00 we purchased and expected a new book and we received a used book. Cover and pages were worn and turned.

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