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by Kevin Major

  • ISBN: 0385658869
  • Category: No category
  • Author: Kevin Major
  • Other formats: docx txt doc lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor Canada (2001)
  • FB2 size: 1513 kb
  • EPUB size: 1695 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 429
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I thought No Man’s Land extraordinary for the searing, clear-eyed honesty of its approach. The simple but skilled construction creates an enormous accumulation of tension and foreboding towards an inexorable and heart-breaking conclusion

I thought No Man’s Land extraordinary for the searing, clear-eyed honesty of its approach. The simple but skilled construction creates an enormous accumulation of tension and foreboding towards an inexorable and heart-breaking conclusion. In obsessively reanalyzing the appalling, sometimes criminal foolishness of World War I, we may too easily dismiss the great hearts that fought it. This book will help us appreciate them afresh. Robert MacNeil, PBS news anchor.

Kevin Major is among the best Canadian writers of his generation. He has established himself as a figure of singular importance in our literature.

Although I read this book several years ago, it had a lasting effect on my thoughts of war. Kavin Major's writing brings the characters to life in your mind, showing you the fear, the heroism, and the humanity that lie in war. As a Newfoundlander, I had learned about the battle of Beaumont Hamel and the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, but this book painted a vivid picture of the battle in my mind.

1995 – No Man's Land. ISBN 1-894463-71-4 and 2005 – No Man's Land: A Play.

ISBN 0-88899-579-2 (nominated: Books in Canada First Novel Award; winner: Governor General's Award, Book-of-the-Year CACL, Ruth Schwartz Award; placed on Hans Christian Honour List). 1980 – Far From Shore. ISBN 0-88899-568-7 (winner: Canadian Young Adult Book Award). 1984 – Thirty-Six Exposures. 1995 – No Man's Land. 1997 – Gaffer: A Novel of Newfoundland.

1)No Man’s Land by Kevin Major takes place during the Battle of Somme and is about a a few soldiers that were sent overseas and were in the Canadian regiment that participated in the great push during the battle of the somme in World War one: the last sentence represents th. .

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1)No Man’s Land by Kevin Major takes place during the Battle of Somme and is about a a few soldiers that were sent overseas and were in the Canadian regiment that participated in the great push during the battle of the somme in World War one: the last sentence represents the connection between Martin and his chaps that came with him. (2) Throughout the book, there are 2 main conflicts or more like challenges, they are the enemy machineguns and the artillery; although the men never see them in person it is takes a great toll to the ending of the story.

However, "No Man's Land" is associated with trenches being set up on both sides. The time period can be set in between October 1914 and November 1918 (sorry). Can anyone give me a summary about No Mans Land by Kevin Major? Did man really land on the moon in 1969? RUDE and MEAN DJ interviews Kevin Jonas!! (All JB Fans MUST read!) YouTube vid!? More questions. Is anyone else tired of Kevin Garnett's antics ever since he landed in Boston? Republicans: Why is there only one major scientific organization that rejects man-made climate change? Answer Questions.

1995) A novel by Kevin Major. On July 1, 1916, the best and the brightest of a generation of Newfoundland men were virtually wiped out. From every bay and cove and town, from fishing stage to merchant's home, they marched off to the Great War, proud members of their very own Newfoundland Regiment, never suspecting what one terrible morning of treachery would bring.

No Man's Land: A Novel. ISBN 10: 0385255799 ISBN 13: 9780385255790. Publisher: Doubleday Canada, Limited, 1996.


Reviews about No Man's Land (3):
Ger
I decided to read No Man’s Land by Kevin Major, because of its importance in Newfoundland history. It is about the disastrous attack on the first day of the Battle at Somme in World War I, when two-hundred and seventy-two young Newfoundland men lost their lives. When picking this historical novel, I knew I ran some risks. First, although it is studied by Newfoundland high school students as part of their curriculum, No Man’s Land is an adult novel. A second reason I ran a risk is that war stories generally don’t interest me. Unfortunately, I have to concur with the Newfoundland students who complain that nothing happens in No Man’s Land until chapter twenty-four. Actually, the book as a whole bored me.

There were scattered moments I did enjoy, such as the budding relationship between main character Haywood and French girl Marie Louise; 2nd Lieutenant Hayward is shy and so requires several encounters to muster the courage to stop and talk to her. During one walk, he stares indirectly at her, then smiles and looks away, before he finally steps forward and kisses her on the neck. There is another cute scene, where Hayward surprises Marie Louise at her home, but is himself surprised to find her mother there. After buying bread from Marie Louise’s mom he awkwardly smiles and waves at Marie Louise, before escaping back to his quarters. Some Newfoundland students couldn’t care less about the relationship, but I appreciated its gentle growth. Of course, truth be told, there is nothing exceptionally new about Major’s portrayal of this romantic relationship. For that reason, I needed No Man’s Land to have more to it than romance. You’d expect it would, given that at heart it’s a war story.

And it does. Major writes often about the camaraderie between other villagers and within the troops, but sadly here is where my interest waxed and waned. Eight-year-old Lucien takes a shine to Hayward and tries to learn English from him. He revels in the moment when Hayward allows him to examine an unloaded pistol. Light-hearted moments like these aside, I preferred the serious ones. The chatting and jesting which occurred in many chapters did so little to develop the characters that I often felt as if at an aimless social gathering where I knew no one. As for the serious moments, sometimes they’re depicted through Hayward’s memories of home: “He recalled his mother’s bread, and how he would cut it still warm and spread it with molasses.” Other times, they’re revealed through conversations. After a visit to the horse stables, Hayward and brash fellow-officer Clarke banter about their fears of the upcoming battle. The sentiment which ends the scene is particularly poignant. The sun pours down on the two and “For a long time they lay on their stomachs and gloried in it, putting off as long as possible the ride back to where they had to be.” Alas, these scenes are too infrequent. Because of how minimalistic Major is in what he shares about the backgrounds, desires, and conflicts of the young men of the Newfoundland Regiment, No Man’s Land often held only slightly more interest to me than a reference book.

Yet I enjoyed Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut and Code Talker by Joseph Bruchac. What’s the difference? Well, both of these war novels featured strong characters about whose fates I cared. Now certainly authors of historical novels are more limited than other writers by facts; in that sense Vonnegut had it easier than Major and Bruchac in that, having served in World War II, he could draw on personal experiences. As for Bruchac, he combined the stories of several real people to create his opinionated Ned Begay. However, Hayward is too calm and collected. The characters in No Man’s Land are supposedly based on real soldiers who wrote letters home and so, perhaps, Major stuck more closely to the facts. While this might work for some readers, it ultimately did not work for me. Slaughterhouse Five and Code Talker are also about more than war itself, one being a satire and the other being about racism. No Man’s Land includes romance, friendship, and battles, but never goes beyond them to make a statement. Again, for some readers this straightforward approach might be enough. For me, a reason to pick a novel over a reference book is that the novel affords me an opportunity to step in someone else’s shoes. This did not happen with No Man’s Land. Consequently it was a disappointing read. And so I’ll return to Major’s books for young people.
Agagamand
If you are going to write a book about WWI, i would suggest that you come up with a new angle than a group of men - too many to develop any characters fully - sitting around in trenches in relatively high spirits until they have to go over the walls. I know this is the reality of the war. I know that this is actually what happened to those poor men. However, I also know almost every war book is the same. This is hardly an exception. This is a short book that can be read in just over an hour, but you are far better off spending that hour watching Gallipoli or Stalingrad if you want to satisfy your craving for great war stories. If you want to read a unique story from the First World War, thy Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden - I guarantee you will be amazed how after 90 years some people can tell a great war story. Kevin Major, despite his best efforts, comes up a bit shy.

This book may be of interest to military historians as it does focus on the Newfoundland regiment. However, this is not enough to save the book for the rest of us.

Relic113
Danrad
Although I read this book several years ago, it had a lasting effect on my thoughts of war. Kavin Major's writing brings the characters to life in your mind, showing you the fear, the heroism, and the humanity that lie in war. As a Newfoundlander, I had learned about the battle of Beaumont Hamel and the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, but this book painted a vivid picture of the battle in my mind.
On July 1st, 1916, 801 men went "over the top" in Beaumont Hamel. Only 68 answered the roll call the next day. Those men deserved to be remembered, and this book is a wonderful tribute to those brave soldiers.

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